So like, anyone want to share resources and connections on agents, producers, studios, etc accepting submissions? | Script Revolution
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So like, anyone want to share resources and connections on agents, producers, studios, etc accepting submissions?

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D. B.'s picture
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Joined: Sep 2016
So like, anyone want to share resources and connections on agents, producers, studios, etc accepting submissions?

I once suggested this in another screenwriting forum and wasn't met with much enthusiasm:

Basically, I figure all of us have done the heavy work of scanning the internet looking for agents, producers, studios, managers and others who are accepting of unsolicited, unrepresented writers to submit their screenplays or are seeking representation.

It's hard work but I figure a lot of us have probably built up some list of people we have contacted or been in contact with even if those things didn't work out for us.

I have an entire word document with a list of emails and sites for studios and agents with submission pages that I'd be happy to share with others. I keep a list of the people who got back to me and let me know if they were interested and the people who never got back to me at all.

I really want to open a forum where we can all just straight up post things like "Hey, i found this agent. They are looking for new clients, here is their email and their submission policy, they responded to me in about 4 weeks telling me they weren't interested in my script but they are looking for blah blah blah so feel free to try your luck".

Idk.

Is anyone interested? 

Lily Blaze's picture
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Joined: Aug 2019

I honestly want to help you so I apologized in advance if I come across as a naysayer.

The phrasing of your question concerns me. For starters, as far as I know, there's no such thing as legit agents for screenwriters. Managers, sometimes, but it varies so much that I don't think it's fair to claim something like, this manager is guaranteed to read your script. It just doesn't work that way. Plus, it's optional. It's entirely possible to get scripts produced without getting a manager.

In all fairness, when I first started looking into this wild and wacky world of screenwriting, I had a similar question and approach. I searched the internet, googled until I could google no more. wrote a lot of notes to myself, collected as much info as possible. I applaud you for your efforts. Doing your homework is fantastic. However, it does concern me that your efforts, such as a collection of emails, might not be the right direction. To me, what you've posted comes across as asking to form a group of people who collectively spam emails in hopes that a complete stranger doesn't say no. Personally, I have no interest in doing that.

I get playing the numbers game. That's one way to go. It's not my thing but if it works for you then great. However, this is a big difference between playing the numbers game and spamming.

The thing is, there are real people involved. Behind every person, email, name, there's a human who's looking for something specific. From what I've read and learned from industry members, all anyone really wants to know is if a screenwriter is someone they want to work with and what is your craft. This makes everything very subjective. There's no one right way. Only what works best for you. Frustrating? Sure, it can be quite frustrating. Welcome to the craft.

It might an idea to consider focusing your efforts on the concept of networking, Make friends. Talk to people. Especially industry members. Stage 32, if you have the funds, and be a good place to start. They're all about networking, but the useful parts of the site is not free.

I don't know your goals. I'm not a mind reader. I could offer some links to articles that might help with your goals. Sharing your goals would probably get you more useful info. Up to you.

Eric Christopherson's picture
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Joined: Sep 2016

I have a lot of sympathy for what Lily has said. The longer I do screenplays the more I think it comes down to script quality, which directly impacts who you know and can get to know. The better the script the more likely you are to get somewhere with it, whether that's optioning it or selling it or, often the first step, simply gaining industry fans for your work, and if you just send the script out there willy nilly you're just going to collect a lot of "no"s or no responses. What if, six months after "finishing" the script, you suddenly figure out how to improve it substantially, but now you've shot your wad, so to speak, regarding marketing options? (This has happened to me.) Another point is that these manager or agent or producer folk often don't know what they want until they see it. For example, I just participated in a little logline contest at Stage 32 where a producer picked my logline as his winner and he asked to read the script. It's an action script and this guy's background is pretty solidly Disney animation. Not in a million years would I have ever pitched him on my own. The converse is you send someone a script that is right up their alley and they say no thanks we already have one of those. (This happened to me this week.) I guess what I'm saying is I'm done with the scattershot approach and I'm trying to make personal connections via my work one at a time.

Lily Blaze's picture
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Joined: Aug 2019

Hey Eric, congratulations! I entered the same logline contest. The timing of it wasn't good for me. The contest opened two months before I could finish making my script presentable. But, it's a free contest, only once a year, and I didn't want to wait another year. I had already written about 2 pages of loglines, so I played pin the tail on the donkey (lol) and submitted. My logline didn't win, no surprise, but they did send me a discount for script coverage. Between that, and the webcasts panelists with invaluable info, I feel like a winner. Fantastic experience and so much useful info direct from industry members. Worth it.

It's interesting to note the panelists' chosen list of loglines, not all, but some, were sent by screenwriters they already knew. The contest wasn't rigged, but it is further evidence that networking does make a difference. No one knows me yet, so that's only fair. I'm working on it...

D. B.'s picture
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Joined: Sep 2016

(I'm typing at work so forgive any errors)
I agree. I would never claim to say that someone is 100% going to read a script just because I happened to get a reply from them (maybe i caught them on a down day, maybe they were interested in my pitch enough to at least respond saying no) I just think in an ocean of no replies, it means something (to me at least) to know that this person or that person reads and responds at least sometimes even when it is a no response.

I also don't mean to say that I want us all to go and bombard a person with emails and queries. The advice for screenwriters looking for representation is often either win a contest, network, or cold query. I was suggesting sharing the resources we may have found over the years.

I have found lists online from various screenwriting sites (like ScriptReaderPro) that have links to managers that accept queries and such for that purpose, and I figured having something like that would be nice.

I'm not talking about sharing personal connections.

I have come across literary agents online who accept new screenwriting clients from time to time and have submission policies (how to submit, where to submit, what they are looking for, etc) that are of no use to me but may be to others. I have tons of things from independent studios who accept pitches, agents, managers, etc. Some I've gotten outright rejections from, some I have never submitted to because I have nothing of value to them, some I have and heard nothing from.

Just wanted to share instead of sitting on it.

As far as my personal goals: I've written a few scripts, won a few low level contest, and I'm trying to build those connections, get an agent, sell a script. The typical song and dance.

David Lambertson's picture
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Joined: Aug 2016

DB - sounds like a very nice offer to me/ I don't have anything to offer back in exchange. But, if you so desire, I would love to see your list.

my email is dlambertson@hotmail.com

 

Lily Blaze's picture
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Joined: Aug 2019

DB, thanks for sharing all info. I also don't have anything to offer. It sounds like you;ve already come across all the info I've found online. Is your list marked with per general criteria? I know, it varies so much, and so many people will suddenly go, oh hey, never thought about considering a (fill in the blank genre) but this one is neat. Heh, an imaginary scenario. Still, some background info is always good before attempting communication.

You really don't need an agent to sell a script. Managers do that, but again, optional. Since I'm in Canada, I've been keeping in mind that I will probably have to get a manager to get scripts across the border. For selling though, not mandatory.

I'm getting the impression you might feel like you're in that classic catch 22. You need a job to get experience, but you need experience to get a job. Networking definitely can help to get out of that catch 22. Make friends with an independent producer, for example.

Steve Garry's picture
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Joined: Sep 2016

These sorts of threads frustrate me, because they bring up all the opinions instead of merely answering (if you can) the call of the OP.  I have posted in other places lists of "companies that accept submissions (or even just queries) on their websites".  Submitting to those shouldn't upset anybody in that company, obviously, so I say "fire away".  My list, at one point, was up to 25 or 30 companies that accepted full files (synopsis and/or script), and a hundred more that said "we accept a logline and paragraph synopsis (ie. pitch) only".  Additionally, companies open and close their invitation, sometimes going years without (eg. Renfield Prod), and then suddenly they pop up open again for a few months. Therefore, I won't even bother to try to find those old lists and will just list a few contemporary ones, here.

Oh, and lately I've even simply run "free open submission screenplays" or some such in Google or Bing.  I add the "free" to try to eliminate the contest results - which are open but not free!  Anyway, every time I do it (once a month?), I seem to find a new candidate (an actual production company).  No deals for me yet, but it's about generating "reads" as the first step, and maybe about finding a new pal, some of whom you can follow along with them from company to company, as they move about - if you've been doing this as long as I have. 

Anyway, what I mean to say is, I'm not "expecting" deals on anything I send out to these invitations - that's the "hope" side of things..

So here are a couple I've used recently (or for a while).  They're on their websites, so I'm not divulging secrets.  There may contain one that you have never seen, and if you post something here (invites on websites, not personal contacts) it may include one I've not seen.  Great!  There's no reason not to share public info; unless we're possessive about these things (hopefully not).

www.shineaustralia.com.au   (seems mostly looking for pilots, not features)

https://www.crazylegsproductions.com/contact

http://www.thekaufmancompany.com/submit_script

https://www.invictafilms.com/unsolicited-script-submissions

www.slickfilms.co.uk    (shorts only; now closed till Summer '21)

www.whitepinepictures.com  (TV mostly)

And then there's always https://www.linkedin.com/in/warrenzide, if you have the next "American Pie"

Note:  Please, be smart, and courteous, and research the companies or at least evaluate their websites so you know what they're looking for!

Related to "open submissions" is the InkTip "free newsletter" that contains 2 free leads per week.  There's no reason not to sign up, though you shouldn't expect them to be for huge multi-million dollar opportunities.  But we all have to start somewhere.

Lastly, despite all of the above, my favorite (and most frequent) read generated pitches are still surprising ones from cold emails or LinkedIn connection requests, with initial contacts double-checked for accuracy via Google, IMDB(pro or not), or anywhere else.  Successes there are genuine accomplishments and, for me, have often led to repeat invitations.  The open submissions opportunities mentioned here are generous, and they're good if you have something useful to them and you're feeling a bit down about things, but remember that you're fighting hordes of competition.

Edited:  To update Slickfilms.co.uk item (these guys are past Oscar-winners, so it's worth submitting when they're open to it - shorts only)

David Lambertson's picture
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Joined: Aug 2016

Thanks for posting these Steve - I will check them out. And re: this:

These sorts of threads frustrate me, because they bring up all the opinions instead of merely answering (if you can) the call of the OP.

Yeah - I got kind of lost in the weeds on this one - thought the dude was merely offering to share a list of contacts that based on his experience are accepting inquires.  Sounds like a generous offer to me 

 

 

 

 

 

D. B.'s picture
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Joined: Sep 2016

Now the ball is rolling!

I will share the ones I have as soon as I get off work in about 3 hours so (please) excuse the wait

David Lambertson's picture
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Joined: Aug 2016

Noice!

D. B.'s picture
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Joined: Sep 2016

Sorry if the formatting is off:

https://www.pictureitproductions.com/

https://wildseedstudios.com/

^^ I had a script that got pretty far with these guys (to the head of their children's programming department), but unfortunately wasn't the right tone. If you have any short form animation scripts, they are worth a shot. Right now they are not currently accepting submissions anymore, but keep an eye on them for when they reopen.

http://www.abentertainment05.com/

https://www.prominent.productions/projects

http://www.meridianartists.com/submissions

http://blakefriedmann.co.uk/submissions

https://dbunnypictures.com/contact-1

https://www.faepictures.com/

https://www.davidhigham.co.uk/submissions/script-submission/

https://www.malteserkreuz-film.de/en/#films

https://www.tridentmediagroup.com/submissions/

Submissions – META Talent Agency

https://rothstock.com/film-development-inquiry/

https://themissionentertainment.com/contact

Submissions | Marty Katz Productions

Chesler/Perlmutter Productions (cheslerperlmutterproductions.com)

Contact - See Saw Films (see-saw-films.com)

zero gravity management contact

^^^ Of course we all know Zero Gravity, but i am still attaching for thsoe that do not. I once got a script request from them and I heard a few people have. But still nothing. But hey, who knows.

BEOTIS - Talent Agency

That's a select few I;ve gotten but i got more.

There are also sites like Screenwriting Staffing where some people go to connect with screenwriters, find writers, find scripts, etc. Obviously these are not big budget studios like Disney or anything but its a place to find paying gigs and studios looking for material. A glitch in the system has them sending me their premium script leads for years, so a lot of the stuff i get sent doesn't even apply to me but i dont know if i can share that or not? Idk. Anyway, i may post nore tomorrow

David Lambertson's picture
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Joined: Aug 2016

Much thanks DB!

Steve Garry's picture
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Joined: Sep 2016

re: Marty Katz in D.B.'s cool post of links, they're open to subs and have made movies (not just talked about them), so that puts them on a good pedestal. However, in 2015 they requested a script off a pitch, but from their release my attorney balked.  I compared the two releases and the one I have looks a bit different from the new one on their site, but it's still a LONG release.  Anyway, I was going to quote his email to me, but the key is that you still have to read everything (including representation commissions, releases, etc.) before you submit.  Queries are okay, but for full files (scripts/synopses) be vigilant.

Lily Blaze's picture
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Joined: Aug 2019

When I first started researching the net for opportunities, I was horrified how many websites just demand a full file submission. Queries make sense to me, whether online submission form or email. But the full script without a person's name to address this to? That's never a good sign.

One technical thing that may help everyone, if a webpage isn't secure (unlocked padlock icon in web address bar), chances are high it's not a legit webpage. If you're really interested, you can always email and ask about their security. If there isn't an email or anyone to ask, I would be very cautious.

David Lambertson's picture
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Joined: Aug 2016

I have never experienced that. Actually, just the opposite. Most don't want you to send anything because they don't want the liability should someone else happen to make something similar to yours and have never been asked to send anything without my name/address on it other than competitions (for obvious reasons).

I am not worried anyway. 1) All of my scripts are posted online somewhere anyway (like here) so if someone wanted to steal - there they are and 2) At this point I am pretty sure that the only when I'll get a feature made is if someone steals it :)

 

Lily Blaze's picture
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Joined: Aug 2019

Oh this isn't about stealing. This is about liability. If, say, you consent by sending the full script via an insecure web form including your name and personal info, there's a risk of fraud, computer virus, all kinds of things that can be a massive pain. But if you consent, whether in writing or digitally, there's very little that can be done.

There's also the age old scheme. First one's free, but then it's gonna cost you...

I'm not saying all links are like that. I'm saying, as I said before, always read the fine print. It never hurts to be cautious.

David Lambertson's picture
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Joined: Aug 2016

Sorry - totally lost. Consent to what?

I thought we were discussing agency submission requirements - that is what my comments refer to. I worked in IT most of my life so I am familiar with insecure web forms, viruses and the like. Are you merely saying only send material to trusted sights?? If so - I get that for sure - just not sure what the link is to DB's info. Anyway....

Lily Blaze's picture
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Joined: Aug 2019

David, every production company, agency, manager, etc, whether legit or not, online or not, has some kind of consent form. It can be hard to tell what's legit and what isn't. Personally, I've found that legit companies, people, tend to be more concerned whether the writer will sue them, for whatever reason, It's just legal stuff.

Peter Gartner's picture
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Joined: Oct 2019

I had a look at some of them, and they want you to have a certificate of copyright before they will read a script.

David Lambertson's picture
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Joined: Aug 2016

Lily - Yes - I am aware of their release (release) forms. Have signed off on several. I think somehow I must not be making this clear. I was asking about what you were referring to:

But the full script without a person's name to address this to? That's never a good sign.

Specifically, in terms of what we are talking about here - sending scripts to companies/agencies i.e., I had never run across that scenario (i.e., they didn't want your name on the script)  - But never mind - I'll move on. Thanks 

Lily Blaze's picture
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Joined: Aug 2019

David, it seem you took something out of context and I'm always more than happy to clarify. This is a text only forum, none of us are mind readers. I'm referring to sending a full script to an insecure website that's anonymous. That's all.

David Lambertson's picture
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Joined: Aug 2016

Steve - again thanks for the companies you provided and the heads-up on the Katz agreement. 

For me personally, their release is not one that I would sign because of their indemnification clause. I actually have refused to sign these in options for scripts (let alone just a submission). My opinion is that is exposes the writer to unlimited liability for things that he/she may ultimately have no control over. 

Thanks again

 

Kaye Koddy's picture
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Joined: Dec 2019

Inspiring story in the Guardian, "Jaws at 35,000 Feet." The author is a flight attendant who wrote a thriller and cold-queried 41 agents resulting in 41 rejections. But #42 was Shane Salerno, screenwriter turned literary agent whose writing credits include Armageddon, Savages, and Shaft. He took her on and she worked on many rewrites and revisions before he offered the book to publishers, resulting in a seven-figure deal.

Nick Brown's picture
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Joined: Feb 2020

Yeah I saw that flight attendant story. Good for her. High concept!

Peter Gartner's picture
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Joined: Oct 2019

Can ylu challenge an indemnity clause by claiming it is unfair ?

David Lambertson's picture
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Joined: Aug 2016

Can ylu challenge an indemnity clause by claiming it is unfair ?

IMO - no, not as it pertains to release forms as you have no negotiating leverage.

I have optioned two features where I was able to:

1) Remove it entirely in one case

2) Restrict my liability to the amount I was paid in the other case

 

 

 

Kaye Koddy's picture
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Joined: Dec 2019

For literary agents, agentquery.com is a great resource. Also info on e-publishing, avoiding scams, grants, email etiquette, agent blogs and Twitter, and more.

David Lambertson's picture
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Joined: Aug 2016

Thanks, Kaye

Peter Gartner's picture
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Joined: Oct 2019

So, you gotta accept the indemnity clause in a release form, but you can object to it in the negotiation for an option contract - ?

David Lambertson's picture
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Joined: Aug 2016

So, you gotta accept the indemnity clause in a release form, but you can object to it in the negotiation for an option contract - ?

IMO - that is correct. 

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