I Am Norah Fildes! by David (China) Woolf | Script Revolution

I Am Norah Fildes!

The world of a renowned feminist and social activist is undermined in the wake of allegations of sexual harassment levied against her beloved father and so she is compelled to opt between family and principles.

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Page Count: 
118pp

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Synopsis
Philadelphia PA, post #Me_Too era.
Norah Fields is a well-known character in the intellectual community of Philadelphia. As a successful, feminist & social activist lawyer, her actions and statements, driven from deep feelings of social justice & gender equality values, often generate waves. She has become the urban flagbearer for these issues. Considering her devotion to feminist issues, romantic relationships with men, are challenging.
Norah and her revered and beloved father Ethan, respected president at local college, maintain a close and caring relationship. Since her mother passed, many years ago, Norah’s deepest fear, is losing her father.
Following an announcement that President Fields is about to receive a prestigious award, at a ceremony with the governor presenting the award, Ethan is approached by a journalist, asking respond to sexual harassment allegations by co-worker. Ethan denies. Distressed, he turns to his friend Brody, who arranges for thugs to persuade the accuser to withdraw her accusations. Norah, tipped about the allegations, confronts her father immediately. Following their conversation, Norah finds and confronts the accuser, who by now, has withdrawn her accusations and claims to having fabricated the charges. Norah supports her father.
A dramatic series of events unfolds that undermines Norah's world. The story leaks and a media storm break out. The college conducts an internal inquiry which results in an announcement of support for president. Norah is denounced and accused of hypocrisy by acquaintances. Tia, Norah’s best friend and colleague, becomes uncomfortable with the events. Sammy, administrator of law firm Norah works for, befriends Norah. Ethan and Norah become targets and their reputation is under attack. Norah, bravely fights back, utilizing her assertive character. She confides in Sammy who helps her uncover the answer to the key question - “What if?”
Additional news reporting, suggests added sexual misconduct complainants have come forward to accuse Ethan. The governor cancels his participation in the ceremony. The law firm where Norah & Sammy work, receives angry phone calls from clients. The firm’s partners hold meeting with Norah, and she is directed to take leave. College donors withdraw their donations, as respond college delays ceremony. Ethan requests leave and hides at one of Brody’s apartments.
Norah again discusses the matter with her father during yet another emotional confrontation but she continues to support him.
Norah feels need for escape in response to events and travels to remote hotel. In need for emotional support, she calls Tia and asks that she comes to the hotel. During the heartfelt discussion, Tia reveals to Norah that her father misbehaved towards her several times and sent her rude messages that she shows Norah, who is now devastated.
Norah has one last confrontation with her father, who continues to deny having ever behaved inappropriately towards women. Norah withdraws her support from her father.
Norah represents her father’s victims, who have filed civil suits against him and wins. After trial, Norah gives a feminist victorious speech.
Norah and Sammy become a couple.
END

Main Characters
NORAH FIELDS, 29 – the only child of Ethan Fields, the esteemed and reputable president of Felix W. Donovan College, and the late Jane Fields. Norah is single and works for a successful law firm where she heads the intellectual property department. Her job description, among other things, also entails meeting with high-profile individuals in the world of film and literature and indeed, she has made quite the name for herself in in those circles. Some celebrities will often seek her counsel in private on a range of private matters and do consider her a friend.
Norah runs a Facebook community with a huge following and is a frequent guest on various TV shows. She has also been known to write the occasional newspaper op-ed. Norah is famous for being a staunch feminist and an uncompromising, vocal advocate of women’s rights who often gives Pro Bono, legal advice to feminist NGOs.
Norah graduated with distinction from Felix W. Donovan prior to getting her law degree at Harvard. She is intellectually broad-minded and well-read, with her interests spanning a variety of fields.
Norah lost her mother, an eminent lawyer in her day, in a car accident when she was just three years old and therefore has very few memories of her. She has always been very close to her father who made sure her upbringing was filled with nothing but harmony, affection, and mutual love. As such, her greatest fear is losing him too.
ETHAN FIELDS, 65 – The acclaimed president of Felix W. Donovan College who, since taking office, has improved the college’s ranking beyond compare. Ethan, a widower, has spent his entire career in education and is an example of an educator with managerial & financial skills who knows how to motivate students and faculty in equal measure.
Ethan has been named the recipient a prestigious prize commemorating 15 years of outstanding, successful Presidentship which he will be awarded at a high-profile ceremony attended by the governor.
Ethan loves and supports his daughter and the two speak daily. He raised her to be a champion of social justice, gender equality, and altruism and is indeed immensely proud of her reputation in those areas. They consult and lean on each other for just about everything that goes on in their lives.
Ethan hasn’t properly dated since his wife's death and is only ever intimate with the occasional sex worker whom he sees discreetly.
Ethan's only true friend is Brody. The pair grew up together, have always kept in close touch, and will often go out for a drink and a catchup.
BRODY DALE, 66 – A divorced real estate businessman who never really made the big bucks. Most of his property is in the old part of town. His businesses tread the fine line between respectable and shady. Brody has ties in the city council and police department and is generally very well-connected. An arrogant man, Brody is someone who likes to talk up and brag about his financial successes and sexual conquests. In a way, he is Ethan's alter ego.
TIA COLEY, 30 – Afro-American, single. Tia is an attorney who works at the same firm as Norah. She has been Norah's best friend ever since Norah joined the firm. The two are very close and are often seen out together.
Tia grew up in a family with a lot of issues but it was her brains, stubbornness and perseverance that got her through law school with flying colors. At work, she is considered a bright and brilliant legal talent.
Tia is no less of a feminist than Norah; however, she likes to keep her politics to herself and therefore admires Norah for the courage of her convictions.
SAMMY GARCIA, 35 – Latino, single. A talented lawyer who was made Administrative Head after demonstrating strong leadership and management skills. Sammy is interested in Norah however, a combination of her image and workplace codes of conduct have thus far stopped him from making a move. Outside the office, Sammy is a mild-mannered man and a bona fide conversationalist with vast knowledge of many subjects. And while he was raised in a loving home, Sammy did grow up poor which is why he knows to appreciate the status he has achieved in life and makes a point of helping his mother and brother financially.
MR. ERICSSON, 71 – Head of the Board of Trustees at Felix W. Donovan College. A pleasant, married man with a flair for wit and sarcasm. He has a British sense of humor that is not always understood by others. As someone who has worked in education his whole life, he has tremendous respect for Ethan’s work as President and as such, tries to accommodate all his funding requests for the many college activities he organizes and spearheads.

All Accolades & Coverage: 

Review by ISA
Title:
I AM NORAH FIELDS!
Genre:
Drama
Written by:
David China Woolf
I AM NORAH FIELDS!
is a thought provoking script with wonderful, well rounded characters and
high stakes all the way to the end. The writer does an amazing job of crafting the characters ,
diving into who they are and making each character's actions match their personality and point
of view on life. The characters are complex, and while reading the script I was impressed by how
the writer slowly introduces them, never giving the reader too many new characters to handle
at once. It's also easy to relate to most of the characters, and in particular I love Norah and feel
bad for what she's going through with her dad. By the end of this script, I felt like these
characters were real people, com plex and not completely likable, but I could envision myself
spending time with them or encountering them out and about in the real world.
In addition to the strong characters, the writer does a pretty good job with the plotting in this
script. The struct ure feels professional, and the story hits most of the right beats, with an
engaging opening hook that sets the tone for the film, a clear inciting incident, and high stakes. I
like how the writer shows Nora struggling with the fact that her dad has been a ccused of sexual
harassment. The way she deals with the whole situation feels believable. The writer does a
great job of pacing the plot points, giving the characters time to breathe and process the events
as they unfold. All of the major plot points are w ritten in an engaging way too.
This is an imaginative script that deals with real world problems. The writer does a great job of
not holding back, letting Norah deal with situations that are super difficult and that have big
implications for her and her f amily. Even though it's really sad that she has to deal with the fact
that her father has committed sexual harassment, it's a great subject, because I'm sure she's not
the only one. This script opens your eyes to the fact that you never know what anyone's capable
of. It's truly a thought provoking, original piece that stands out because of the way that it
conveys this theme. By the end of the film, I felt like I had just read a unique and memorable
story.
Though the big picture stuff largely works, some of
the finer details could use improvement. In
particular, there is a lot of room to improve on the action/description. As I was reading the
script, I noticed that the action/description sometimes tells rather than shows. This often takes
the form of a line that just says that something happens, without describing how it happens on
screen. For example, on page 1, the script says: “Traffic stalls for a while, but the officers restore
order and things calm down.” On page 4, the script says: “Michael finishes ed iting the clip and
sends it to Norah who forwards it to her father and to her bestie Tia, right away.” Since a
screenplay is a blueprint for a movie, it's important to be specific about how action like this is
shown on screen. How long does traffic stall f or? What do the officers do to restore order? How
long does it take for things to calm down? How do we, the viewers of the film, know that
Michael has finished editing the clip? How does Nora receive the clip? How do we know she's
sending it to her father? Does she text him? Do we see his name on screen?
Similarly, there are places where dialogue is included in the action/description. It's important to
Similarly, there are places where dialogue is included in the action/description. It's important to always format dialogue as dialogue, otherwise actors may miss their lines when they are going always format dialogue as dialogue, otherwise actors may miss their lines when they are going through thethrough the script. For example, on page 74, the script says: “As he steps out of the building, the script. For example, on page 74, the script says: “As he steps out of the building, the reporters approach him, asking for a response.” This should instead be written something like: reporters approach him, asking for a response.” This should instead be written something like: “As he steps out of the building, the reporters approach him” and then i“As he steps out of the building, the reporters approach him” and then it should be followed by t should be followed by a line or lines of dialogue where the reporters ask for a response.a line or lines of dialogue where the reporters ask for a response.
The script generally has strong formatting, however, I was taken out of the story at times by
The script generally has strong formatting, however, I was taken out of the story at times by typos, grammar issues, and awkward sentence construction. Especially typos, grammar issues, and awkward sentence construction. Especially in the latter half of the in the latter half of the script, there are quite a few times when the wrong version of your/you're is used. Your is script, there are quite a few times when the wrong version of your/you're is used. Your is possessive, so it should be used when talking about about someone's possession, family possessive, so it should be used when talking about about someone's possession, family member, friend, etc. For example, one might say: youmember, friend, etc. For example, one might say: your house, your father. On the other hand, r house, your father. On the other hand, you're is a contraction, which means it should only be used in place of the words “you are.” For you're is a contraction, which means it should only be used in place of the words “you are.” For example, instead of saying: “You are my best friend” one might say: “You're my best friend.” example, instead of saying: “You are my best friend” one might say: “You're my best friend.” However, it's improper toHowever, it's improper to say: “You're best friend is over there” since in that case someone's say: “You're best friend is over there” since in that case someone's best friend is being discussed. The correct version of that sentence is: “Your best friend is over best friend is being discussed. The correct version of that sentence is: “Your best friend is over there.”there.”
I was also confused by the line on page 52, where the script says that Norah a
I was also confused by the line on page 52, where the script says that Norah and Sammy “leave nd Sammy “leave the place hugged.” I've never heard that expression before, so it took me out of the script. Does the place hugged.” I've never heard that expression before, so it took me out of the script. Does it mean that they have their arms around each other? Or do they hug and then leave the place? it mean that they have their arms around each other? Or do they hug and then leave the place? It might be worth rephrasing this sentence, sincIt might be worth rephrasing this sentence, since I'm not sure that it's an expression, or if it is e I'm not sure that it's an expression, or if it is it's not a very common one.it's not a very common one.
It also struck me as strange that Norah and her father say “ahh” so much. When I read their
It also struck me as strange that Norah and her father say “ahh” so much. When I read their lines of dialogue with “ahh” the first couple times, I thought it gave them a uniqulines of dialogue with “ahh” the first couple times, I thought it gave them a unique way of e way of speaking and made them stand out. However, the script features this quirk so often that it speaking and made them stand out. However, the script features this quirk so often that it became distracting as I was reading the script. The script would be an easier read if Norah and became distracting as I was reading the script. The script would be an easier read if Norah and her father were to say “ahh” less frequently. Maybe it's jusher father were to say “ahh” less frequently. Maybe it's just used for emphasis, like when her t used for emphasis, like when her father is really stressed out.father is really stressed out.
Around page 71, I found myself wondering what exactly Norah's father is guilty of and how he
Around page 71, I found myself wondering what exactly Norah's father is guilty of and how he has been sexually inappropriate. There are so few details about it, at the start of the script ihas been sexually inappropriate. There are so few details about it, at the start of the script it's t's revealed that he did something to the librarian, but it's not clear what. Eventually, around page revealed that he did something to the librarian, but it's not clear what. Eventually, around page 80, Norah's father reveals that he touched a a bum or two, however, the stakes for the second 80, Norah's father reveals that he touched a a bum or two, however, the stakes for the second half of the script could be ratcheted up even more if this shalf of the script could be ratcheted up even more if this scene were to occur sooner. If the cene were to occur sooner. If the scene had occurred just 10scene had occurred just 10--15 pages sooner, it would have helped to keep me more invested, 15 pages sooner, it would have helped to keep me more invested, since after hearing her father admit that he was guilty, I really wanted to know more about how since after hearing her father admit that he was guilty, I really wanted to know more about how he was guilty and what was going tohe was guilty and what was going to happen with Norah.happen with Norah.
Though the dialogue is written in an engaging way, it could use some revisions. At times when I
Though the dialogue is written in an engaging way, it could use some revisions. At times when I was reading the dialogue, it was hard for me to believe that the characters were real people. was reading the dialogue, it was hard for me to believe that the characters were real people. Many of the characters speak in a way that maMany of the characters speak in a way that makes them feel younger than they are. The kes them feel younger than they are. The dialogue would be stronger if at least some of the characters were to speak in a more dialogue would be stronger if at least some of the characters were to speak in a more
intelligent, thoughtful way. One way to improve dialogue is to stop and listen at various times of
intelligent, thoughtful way. One way to improve dialogue is to stop and listen at various times of day, to the people speaking arday, to the people speaking around you. What do they sound like when they speak? How do ound you. What do they sound like when they speak? How do they choose their words? Some might be quiet, others frantic, some might be direct, others they choose their words? Some might be quiet, others frantic, some might be direct, others might stumble over their words like Ethan. It's especially hard for me to believe that someone of might stumble over their words like Ethan. It's especially hard for me to believe that someone of Ethan's aEthan's age gets frazzled every time someone tries to question him, to the point where he often ge gets frazzled every time someone tries to question him, to the point where he often doesn't make any sense.doesn't make any sense.

Submitted: December 12, 2020
Last Updated: August 15, 2021

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The Writer: David (China) Woolf

I have been a movie lover for all my life, and I am not young. I have been writing stories since my early 20s and imagining that they would be filmed. I didn't know there was a script format, but I have numerous pages with stories from different genres in my drawer. It's been about five years since I decided to do something about my passion. I enrolled in two screenwriting workshops taught by two of Israel's best teachers. They taught me a lot and gave me the confidence to begin writing my own screenplay. Then I purchased script writing software and converted the script to the format commonly used in the industry. Writing and rewriting, editing and polishing led to a point at which I am... Go to bio