Shootin' The Shorts

Shootin' The Shorts is run by J.E. Clarke a longtime prolific screenwriter who loves to give others a little boost in the marketplace by highlighting why she believes their short script may stand out. She brings with her a loyal band of readers who share the same compassionate attitude who have joined her cause as it's grown and grown to connect writers with filmmakers on a monthly basis. Now it finds a home here on Script Revolution.

This is all about highlighting what makes a script great by focusing on the positives. You'll find no negative criticism or lists of issues here. Submitting a short script for consideration couldn't be easier, simply scroll down to the bottom of your script edit page and tick the "Submit to Shootin' The Shorts" checkbox. Please note; it takes time to get through all submissions, everything is subjective, and we're by no means saying these are the best short scripts on Script Revolution, they are simply the ones that have found an admirer within this section - CJ

A Boy's Fear - Dive into the Depths...

A Boy’s Fear
A young boy has no choice but to face his deepest fear

The room is desolate, dank, and dark.  A small boy sits alert on a concrete bench nailed to the floor.  He is cold, alone and seemingly trapped.   From where he huddles, he can hear other children’s screams. 

The young child is Billy, the protagonist of Chris Keaton’s one-page script, A Boy’s Fear.  Billy’s not imagining things.  What he fears is very real, awaiting him outside.

Billy shivers. His eyes dart around nervously. He hugs his knees and watches the wooden door with dread.

When he hears the footsteps approach, Billy knows that they’re coming for him.  He has no choice, but to face his fears and…

A Boy’s Fear masterfully distills the suspense and fright that might fill a feature-length film into a one-page thriller.  Short and sweet, audiences will love how quickly Billy will get their hearts pounding!

About the reviewer:  Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing.  She may be reached at: Cottle54321“AT”Gmail.

About the writer:   Chris Keaton is an Air Force veteran living with his family in sunny Arizona. He began his writing career as a screenwriter, but decided that he'd like people to actually read his stories, so is expanding into prose. You can see some of his projects on his website, (www.Chris-Keaton.com).

The Script

A Boy's Fear

A boy faces a most personal fear.

About The Reviewer

Julia Cottle's picture
Real name: 
Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing.Read more

About The Writer

Chris Keaton's picture
Real name: 
Chris Keaton is an Air Force veteran living with his family in sunny Arizona. He began his writing career as a screenwriter, but decided that he'd like people to actually read his stories, so is expanding into prose. You can see some of his projects on his website, (www.Chris-Keaton.com) or at...Read more

23 and Them! Family - In the End, That's All That Counts...

23 and Them
DNA Tests Never Turn Out Well....

The world’s full of mysteries. Does God exist, how did we get here, is our world even real…and how on earth does that milquetoast office slave have such a stunning wife?

That final mystery, of course, is the one relevant to 23 And Them. And it’s one that Harvey, the office slave in question, is forced to seriously ponder after a fellow co-worker observes that his two “children” don’t really resemble him at all. Nor their mother, Sue.

Now Harvey’s home life is blissful – Sue’s a stay-at-home cook, and the kids are just as innocent and smiley as she is.

Almost too innocent, in fact.

But the seeds of doubt have been sown, and eventually they grow too big for Harvey’s mind. So, he secretly obtains a 23 and Me kit, along with DNA swabs from his “perfect” wife and kids.

8 weeks later, the results arrive. At the front door. When Harvey’s not home.

And when he does get home, his wife’s words and actions show her fury, but the smile never disappears from her face…or the kids’ faces, for that matter.

Why? Because Sue’s got her reasons for tying the knot with Harvey, but they’re not obvious reasons. Rather, they relate to the results of the DNA tests, which also reveal his wife’s darkest secret. One which she shares with “their” kids.

Are Harvey’s children his? Why did Sue marry him? And what do Sue and the kids have in common that Harvey doesn’t?

With tension oozing off every page as the moment to the truth draws nearer and nearer, 23 and Them will hook you in and never let you go until you find answers to these questions. Answers you certainly won’t be able to guess!

The Script

23 and THEM!

Those home genetic tests sometimes reveal more than you expect and can be life changing...

About The Reviewer

Hamish Porter's picture
Real name: 
That guy who does a load of STS reviews and writes when he's not working or reading superfluous interesting articles. My filmmakers Rushmore is Nolan, Kubrick, Hitchcock, and Eastwood. Psychological thrillers, crime, and dramas are my thing, but I'm impartial to anything that's...Read more

About The Writer

Tim Westland's picture
Real name: 
Howdy... my name is Tim Westland. I am an award winning writer, with multiple feature and short scripts placing highly in Page, Screencraft, BlueCat and other well respected competitions. Several of my short scripts have been produced, most recently “For The Love of God”, a topical LGBT-friendly...Read more

Treat - Or Is It Trick?

Treat
Trick?  Or treat?  Do they dare open the door to find out?

Bad weather can sure put a damper on vacation plans.  Having to make a detour to an unknown place due to inclement conditions is particularly frustrating.  It’s that much worse when the only available place to stop for shelter is seedy or otherwise uninviting.  And, there’s no dining facilities.  And, the vending machine is all but empty.  And, the person behind the desk is unhelpful.  Or, the other guests are annoying. Or no rooms are even available.  But, when all of these possible scenarios come together, well… it’s what you might call a perfect storm.

Steve Miles short horror piece, Treat, adds a touch of terror to top off such a worst-case travel scenario.  Young Denise and Lyle, still clad in their souvenir t-shirts from Super Smiley Fun-Park Land, find themselves stranded in a dilapidated motel together with Howard, a fifty-something year old construction guy who has just poured himself what seems to be the last of the complimentary coffee as he flips the page on the desk calendar to the right date.  It’s Halloween.

The old motel owner, Percy, enters with his arm full of blankets.  But, when he notices the calendar he immediately begins to tremble.  Then there’s a knock on the door.  Percy warns his guests not to open it, under any circumstances.

Denise and Lyle try to reason with Percy.  After all, it’s probably just some unlucky folks caught in the same storm they had escaped earlier that evening.  Howard watches the exchange, amused, while maintaining his post in the doorframe that he convinced will save him from any natural disaster.  Percy stands his ground.

The KNOCKING comes again. Impatient.

LYLE
I’m sorry, Mister.

He moves to the door, takes hold of the handle -- Percy’s boney hand clasps his.

He looks back into Percy’s frightened eyes.

PERCY
(whispered)
Motel’s closed.

A VOICE from outside, a rasped, almost mocking tone.

VOICE (O.S.)
Trick or treat?

The colour drains from Percy’s face.

DENISE
They’re just children--

Percy clamps a hand across her mouth.

Is Percy just a crazy old motel keeper?  Or, is there something truly evil lurking outside?  If you haven’t had your fill of terrifyingly delightful films about storms, old hotels and deadly danger awaiting on the other side of doors, you’ll be dying to see Treat on screen.

You probably won’t be the only one…

The Script

Treat

Stranded in an isolated motel on Halloween, a group of strangers faces a dilemma when the elderly proprietor refuses to open the door to a cry for help.

About The Reviewer

Julia Cottle's picture
Real name: 
Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing.Read more

About The Writer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 
Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount of...Read more

Satellite Motel - Check in and Check it Out!

Satellite Motel
A travel-weary salesman checks into a small Mom' n' Pop motel and has an extraterrestrial encounter.

The seemingly friendliest places and people often hide the darkest secrets and evils: ever since Psycho revolutionised horror all those years ago, this idea has been abused more than Janet Leigh’s character in THAT scene, and usually to similarly awful results.

Not so in John Hunter’s Satellite Motel, which uses that well-worn trope to create an inevitable sense of dread, then completely turns it on its head.

The setup just begs for a skilful director to create that unsettling feeling: a lonesome man, Davis, drives down a lonesome road into a lonesome town and checks into the only hotel for miles: The Satellite Motel.

Booked into room Number 7 and handed an old-school metal key by one half of the elderly yet cynically simple couple who run the joint, Davis leaves the meagre and messy reception to knock himself out for the night.

But he’ll never reach the comforts of Room 7’s bed. Nor will he not survive the night. Instead, Davis is about to experience the weirdest few hours of his life.

From a strange room and stranger conversation through to a mind-bending finale via a, joining Davis on his adventure guarantees twists and revelations just like any horror…but with a Twilight Zone-esque abonormalness and humour.

A mixture that comes together to create one brilliantly inventive genre-flipping script which just oozes with cinematic potential. So why delay? Check into the Satellite Motel today!

The Script

Satellite Motel

A travel-weary salesman checks into a small Mom'n'Pop motel and has an extraterrestrial encounter.

About The Reviewer

Hamish Porter's picture
Real name: 
That guy who does a load of STS reviews and writes when he's not working or reading superfluous interesting articles. My filmmakers Rushmore is Nolan, Kubrick, Hitchcock, and Eastwood. Psychological thrillers, crime, and dramas are my thing, but I'm impartial to anything that's...Read more

About The Writer

John Hunter's picture
Real name: 
I am an award-winning and produced scriptwriter. My voice is character driven, slightly dark and quirky with a dash of humor. Ten of my shorts have been showcased on STS and 2 of these have been produced. My dystopian horror short, Baby Soup, won the 2013 Florida Independent Filmmakers Contest, was...Read more

Black Cherry - The Darker (and Funnier) the Script, the Sweeter the Juice...

Black Cherry 2....

There once was a city wracked by crime…

...Pimps, pushers and hoods ran the streets.  But unforgiving times breed unforgiving heroes.

Cue the funk soul soundtrack for...

Black Cherry: East Harlem’s sassy, street-wise detective.  The maverick kind who knows how to keep the criminal underworld in check and look damn fine doing it.  Block by block Black Cherry's taken out the trash, putting crime in its place.

Only there’s a new player in town.  One who’s keen to take advantage of Black Cherry’s dedication to the badge and fill the vacuum left behind.  The kind of player with more than just a mean streak...

ISAAC 
Sanchez? You don't wanna be messin' with Dirty Sanchez.
That dude will leave a bad taste in your mouth.

But this is Black Cherry; the kind of cop who takes it personally when an out of town pimp takes to running his game on her beat.

Black Cherry stands toe to toe with Stubing, pounds her fists on his desk.

BLACK CHERRY 
I want Sanchez. Send me in undercover.

But it’s not that simple - it never is.  This one’s by the books and there’s already a sister-in-blue working deep cover for an angle on Sanchez. 

But crime is what happens when you're making other plans...

BLACK CHERRY 
Who was she, Dr. Bricker?

BRICKER
Her name was Julie McCoy. She was one of ours.

So when Julie winds up on the slab the takedown falls to Black Cherry and her fresh-faced partner, Gopher Smith:

GOPHER 
Just call me Gopher, everybody does. 
What can I call you? Black Cherry? 
Cherry? Blackie?

Cherry turns, gives Gopher a death stare. 

GOPHER 
Or maybe just Detective Jones would be better.

Sanchez just picked the wrong town in which to redirect his mail.  These are Black Cherry’s streets.  And she’s got a message to deliver…

To find out what that is you’ll have to read Black Cherry 2, Dave Troop’s tongue-in-cheek homage to blaxploitation flicks.  A world of vision impairing hairdos, overbearing police chiefs, fetishist pimps and sassy can-do attitudes when it comes to fighting crime.

The Script

Black Cherry 2

A sassy female cop protects the streets of Harlem from a lethal pimp in a parody of 1970's Blaxploitation films.

About The Reviewer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 
Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount of...Read more

About The Writer

David Troop's picture
Real name: 
Dave Troop began writing as soon as he could hold a No. 2 pencil. In 2012, he discovered the beauty and the challenge of the five page screenplay while writing short scripts for MoviePoet.com and Simplyscripts. Dave continues to write and review short scripts for Script Revolution and...Read more

The Plague Doctor - What Truly Ails Us Might Not Be Visible At First Sight...

The Plague Doctor

“Sometimes things that plague us aren’t just our imaginations at work.”

Do you believe in things you can’t explain? Ghosts, apparitions, non-corporeal entities of every design? 

Many films have been made about what exists beyond the earthly realm of the living but what happens when the living can’t imagine existing past a certain age?  When the possibility of becoming a ghost, apparition or something else altogether is more real than anything on earth? 

Nine year old Liam is a normal fourth grader who hates riding the school bus because of bullies and has a crush on a girl in his class. A regular kid…until he isn’t anymore. He and his mother receive devastating news about his health. Together, they start to cope with how different their lives are in light of this new reality. 

Childhood sicknesses like common colds and chickenpox affects virtually every kid but a smaller percentage are affected by more serious health issues. According to the CDC, one of the leading causes of death in children ages 5-14 is cancer. Liam is one of those kids.

On the first day of his new life, something strange appears to him in the dim light of his bedroom. Something from the shadows. Something that he can’t explain. 

The Plague Doctor. 

He reveals himself to children, shroud in layers of darkness, never revealing his true intentions. 

Liam isn’t sure if this doctor means him help or harm. And he can’t articulate who or what the apparition is to anyone. Not even his mother, whose mind is consumed by her son’s grave diagnosis. 

As Liam’s fragile health declines, it seems that he encounters the Plague Doctor at every turn. But one day, the doctor steps in silently to help Liam when he needs it most and one is left to wonder why this interaction is different from all the rest. Does this mean Liam’s time on earth has run out after just nine short years? 

Rooted in realism, Mennella tackles childhood illness with a sensitive somberness. It’s dark and delicate in a way that not many scripts have mastered. 

This is unlike any mystery you know. With vivid imagery, a believable concept and a lovable main character, Plague Doctor will grab you from Liam’s first line. 

This script will keep you reading until the very end to answer two fateful questions. 

Does Liam survive? And what is the Plague Doctor?  Is he a Bearer of Good Tidings - or Doom?

The Script

The Plague Doctor

A young boy fighting the battle of his life encounters a strange but intriguing entity, The Plague Doctor.

About The Reviewer

Karis Watie's picture
Real name: 
Karis Watie is a screenwriter from Texas who was accidentally transplanted in New England. She copes with the weather by closely studying television shows and thinking up more dramatic ways to develop characters in her own scripts. She tried the spotlight and it wasn't for her because she...Read more

About The Writer

Jon Mennella's picture
Real name: 
Jon Mennella was raised in New York City and educated in Boston. He currently resides in Brooklyn where he spends his free time nurturing an ever-growing love for film and screenwriting. He was a finalist in the Writers' Store Industry Insider Competition and two of his short screenplays, The...Read more

Close to Sunset: But Not Yet There...

Close to Sunset

Home movie footage has a way of evoking emotion. A grainy, colour faded moment captured in time. This is how Close to Sunset starts: a backyard; young brothers, Jack and Sam, fool for the camera. A fleeting memory of childhood innocence.

Cut to evening.  Shadows grow over a public playground. A car prowls along an adjacent road. The boys play, each lost in a world of his own. Moments later, Jack looks up to find his brother gone. He squints into the setting sun - just in time to catch Sam wave goodbye before he slips into the car and vanishes forever.

Jump forward several decades. Jack, now in his 50s with a family of his own. It’s been a rough week for Jack. Mom’s dead. Her estate needs to be settled which leaves Jack and younger sister, Trisha, to clear the old family home for sale.

It’s a task fraught with emotion. The sting of memory carried with every trinket and family photograph. There’s that yellow dress of Mom’s or the grave of Houdini, beloved house-cat who was never fully tamed.  

As Jack delves ever deeper into the shadows of Mom’s life, secrets begin to reveal themselves. Old wounds are opened and tensions rise until finally, Jack stumbles upon the darkest recess of them all...

But you'll have to read the full script to discover what that is.

Steven Clark’s haunting thriller Close to Sunset lights a fuse that burns to the very end. It’s a tense, brooding mystery, delivered with a subtlety that begs to be picked up.  Any filmmaker looking for a low budget, nuanced thriller would be remiss not to check this script out immediately. 

The Script

Close To Sunset

After the death of his mother, a middle-aged man learns the horrifying truth about the childhood disappearance of his brother.

About The Reviewer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 
Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount of...Read more

About The Writer

Steven Clark's picture
Real name: 
A writer since 13, I began screenwriting four years ago as a more direct outlet for my creativity. Since then, I've had two short scripts produced, and two more optioned. My writing style is subtle and understated, yet powerful in its emotional simplicity. I'm currently collaborating on a...Read more

Sons and Broken Noses - Don't Let Either Get Out of Joint...

SONS & BROKEN NOSES
Nobody ever told you there'd be days like these...

Ah, the Emerald Isle, land of saints, scholars, and born story tellers. Resplendent in all its greenery and rich with its history of literary giants – James Joyce, Oscar Wilde, Jonathan Swift, to name a few.

No big surprise then that Ireland also boasts its unique brand of inimitable screenwriters and filmmakers. Classics such as: In The Name Of The Father, The Wind That Shakes The Barley, My Left Foot, and crowd pleasers: The Commitments, The Guard, In Bruges, Once.

2016 was a bumper year for the Irish Film Industry and screenwriters continue to make an indelible mark, particularly writers of hard-boiled crime, with an edge and flair for black comedy. You could say they’re making a killing.

Damien Michael Aulsberry continues this tradition in fine form with his short screenplay: Sons & Broken Noses. Opening with a shot of a car boot slamming and a bloodied hand, this ominous sign sets the tone for what’s to follow.

We meet JAKE KELLY and SEAN BARRY, two bumbling wannabe bank robbers peeling down a lonely country road, one of them with a bullet wound at the hand of the other. You guessed it, things have not gone according to plan. In fact they’ve gone quite a bit pear shaped.

Who thwarted their plans for the perfect bank heist? None other than: skinny runt, seventeen year old, GABRIEL, on work experience with said bank. With the cops now hot on their heels and running around the arse-end of nowhere, the heat’s just been turned up to red-hot for these two after discovering the lad they’ve just hurled into the back of the boot is none other than the son of Irish mob-boss, MICK RONAN.

Oh, dear. An apology is definitely in order, wouldn’t you say?

Followed by some heavy duty groveling, and bargaining for their lives, especially when one of them has broken the young lad’s nose, or more aptly: spread his nose all over his face.

Seems one of these guys is going to have to take the fall.

SEAN                  
We messed up Mick. And we’re sorry.
(beat)
What if I kneecap him? Paramilitary style, no fucking around.

Mick takes a long time to contemplate. Eventually...

MICK (V.O.)
Won’t work Sean. Sets a precedent.
Then everyone will be looking to get kneecapped instead of whacked.
We’d have complete fucking chaos. Lads hobbling round all over the place.  …

Then there’s that little dilemma of returning mob-boss’s son to the fold and getting away unscathed.

With its great visuals, bang on dialogue, and perfectly balanced humour,  Sons & Broken Noses is a quirky, comedically irreverent crime drama.

Filmmakers: You don’t need the luck of the Irish to make a good fist of this one. At the time of writing this review, Sons & Broken Noses had already reached the Finals of the Southern California Screenplay contest, so it’s already got winner written all over it.

Our advice: Put down that pint of Guinness, get down from your bar stool, and head for the nearest camera, before some other lucky lads beat you to it.

There’s no denying, this one’s good craic. 

Be a crime not to do it justice.

LOW TO MEDIUM BUDGET: Three hard-faced crim types with talent to match, a plucky ‘teen’ willing to have his nose broken (just kidding, Method acting is not required), and a couple of intimidating heavies (no dialogue) to complete the background.

Borrow a car, if you don’t have your own, mix up some faux blood, hit the road and film some blokes out in the middle of nowhere. Add a couple of other locations – barn, diner, and house, and you’re good to go.

About The Reviewer

L. Chambers's picture
Real name: 
L.Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She currently works...Read more

About The Writer

Damien Michael Aulsberry's picture
I write for therapeutic reasons. If I didn't get all the mad shit out of me head, I'd be a lunatic... Currently in Post-Production of a short I wrote called "Family Business". Directed by Oisin Woods and starring Bosco Hogan, Paul Ronan, Karl Shiels, Anthony Morris and Bern...Read more

Grenade - Start Counting...

Grenade

A struggling war veteran and the grandson he barely knows together find a way to blow their pasts sky high.  

It seems like every family has at least one; the relative who just doesn’t seem to understand what it might mean to be a responsible adult.  When they’re around, all hell breaks loose.  But, fortunately, they’re almost never around.

Iggy, the young protagonist of Steve Miles’ Grenade, has several such adults in his life.  He can’t sleep at his dad’s house because his father doesn’t have a place for him to stay.  His mom’s boyfriend is history.  And his mom?  Well, she’s so harried, that Iggy spends his morning getting his kid sister and himself ready for school. 

And, then there’s Grandpa Bryn. Sometimes Iggy’s mom sends him to grandpa’s house on errands, but he doesn’t stay long.

IGGY
What’s that?

BRYN
What’s it look like?

IGGY
A battleship.

BRYN
Round Table Class Landing Ship’s what that is. What it was.

IGGY
Was that the one you was on?

After a few failed strikes, a match takes. Bryn stares at the flame a beat before lighting the hob.

BRYN
What’s your Ma’ told you ’bout me?

Iggy wavers, not really knowing how to answer.

BRYN
She send you down to see if I was still here?

Iggy looks hurt. He pulls the envelope from his bag, drops it on the table.

IGGY
Made me bring you this.

Iggy shoulders his pack, pauses at the exit.

IGGY
She says you don’t like people. You don’t like work. You live on a boat so you can run away whenever you want, not have to bother with us.

With that, he slips out the hatch.

So, Iggy has no one to turn to each time the same group of boys wait for him to step outside to punch the living daylights out of him.

But, he does have an old grenade.  Iggy found it one day on a detour he made to avoid his assailants. He wasn’t going to tell anyone about it, but Grandpa Bryn discovered it in his bag one day. 

Iggy thought it was a dud.  But Bryn realizes that it’s not. And, what he plans to do with it will change Iggy and Bryn’s lives forever. 

Steve Miles has become a master of stories about people whose understandings about themselves and their histories are completely demolished by a seemingly minor interruption in their daily lives.

In this case, it’s a grenade. 

If you crave a film that explodes assumptions about dysfunctional families, you won’t want to miss Grenade. 

The Script

Grenade

A chance discovery at an abandoned army barracks gives a bullied youngster a chance to reconnect with his errant grandfather.

About The Reviewer

Julia Cottle's picture
Real name: 
Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing.Read more

About The Writer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 
Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount of...Read more

Under the Influence - But of What?

We all know the symptoms. A thumping headache. A sense of tiredness. An unquenchable thirst. And of course, the complete inability to remember what happened less than 24 hours ago.

Yup, it’s a hangover. And our main character in Under the Influence, Dexter, is just another typical young male struggling with one, regrets and all included.

What isn’t typical, however, is the type of pain Dexter’s also experiencing.

While classic movies like The Lost Weekend and Days of Wine and Roses focused on the personal, psychological problems caused by excessive drinking, Dexter’s got a much more…physical issue to contend with.

His body is covered head to toe in huge, red, bruises. He’s vomiting blood. And his memory’s damaged too – completely lacking an explanation for his scars.

Yet as he begins to clean up his wounds, clues start forming in his mind, triggered by everyday objects. The clock on his cooker. 11:36. His phone. No new calls.

Then it all starts coming back to him. The bar. The car. The hedge. The roadside. And finally, the cause of his myriad of injuries.

But something’s not quite right about his “recollection”. There’s another aspect of his mind at work here, distorting the true events into something far, far more sinister and surreal…

What caused Dexter’s body to become so bloodied? What’s the reason for his mind distorting the truth?

If you want answers to those questions, you’ll have to dive into this entertaining and surprisingly moralistic script. Just make sure you haven’t been drinking beforehand – this ain’t a script to read with a muddled mind!

The Script

Under the Influence

Waking with a hangover, a man must try to remember the previous night to help understand his current situation.

About The Reviewer

Hamish Porter's picture
Real name: 
That guy who does a load of STS reviews and writes when he's not working or reading superfluous interesting articles. My filmmakers Rushmore is Nolan, Kubrick, Hitchcock, and Eastwood. Psychological thrillers, crime, and dramas are my thing, but I'm impartial to anything that's...Read more

About The Writer

Anthony Hudson's picture
Real name: 
I've been writing on and off for around 10 years now and mainly write comedy, but have ventured into horror and drama too. I've written over 25 short scripts, with a number being produced. My features total 5 with a few more being worked on. Not only do I love writing but I also enjoy...Read more

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