Shootin' The Shorts

Shootin' The Shorts is run by J.E. Clarke a longtime prolific screenwriter who loves to give others a little boost in the marketplace by highlighting why she believes their short script may stand out. She brings with her a loyal band of readers who share the same compassionate attitude who have joined her cause as it's grown and grown to connect writers with filmmakers on a monthly basis. Now it finds a home here on Script Revolution.

This is all about highlighting what makes a script great by focusing on the positives. You'll find no negative criticism or lists of issues here. Submitting a short script for consideration couldn't be easier, simply scroll down to the bottom of your script edit page and tick the "Submit to Shootin' The Shorts" checkbox. Please note; it takes time to get through all submissions, everything is subjective, and we're by no means saying these are the best short scripts on Script Revolution, they are simply the ones that have found an admirer within this section - CJ

Cat and Mouse - Who's the Prey?

Cat & Mouse
When Harry’s deadly job brings him home after fifteen years,
he learns his target involves an old love, safeguarding a secret even more dangerous than him.

Cat & Mouse is the new life or death.

Harry’s from around here. Where is here exactly? London - but of course.

Harry's been gone for more than ten years, but today a strict work deadline brings him and colleague Donovan right back to the doorstep of his old life.

No one is quite sure what Harry and his wise-cracking buddy do for a living - but they spend nights dressed in expensive suits, wining and dining clients at snazzy hotels. Whatever the job entails, they’re damned good at what they do. Whatever that may be.

Truth is…Harry and Donovan are closers.

These are men most of us will never have the "pleasure" of meeting. Which is a very, very, very good thing.

When this motley pair closes something... it is never, ever reopened. They don’t punch time clocks; but they’re punctual professionals nonetheless. Clean. Efficient. Silent. In, Out and Done - before anyone has the slightest clue where they've been.

When Harry gets this latest order, he assumes it isn’t any different than other assignments he's expertly handled in the past…An assumption that turns out monstrously wrong.

Shortly after an attractive epidemiologist crosses his path - unknowingly throwing a wrench into his bloody work.

Then, Harry's old life rears its attractive head.  It's a face from the past: on a familiar form clad in jeans and a Guns’ N Roses t-shirt.  Which is when the countdown to collison begins.

In a blinding muzzle flash, Harry'll have to decide if THIS mark hits too close to home...

Take a life or risk not living to see his own future?

Tick, tock, tick, tock, DING!

What unfolds next will surely surprise - and burn an unforgettable image into one's brain.

Jeremy Storey’s Cat & Mouse is no ordinary Saturday night special. A classic story of love, blended with new age thriller, this short balances emotion and entertainment with style.  

Read this one, and we guarantee you'll be on the edge of your seat.  But take care not to fall off. As a cat, you won't see this ending coming. Sometimes it's much safer to be a mouse...

The Script

Cat & Mouse

When Harry’s deadly job returns him home after fifteen years, his carefully calibrated anonymity is compromised when he learns that his target involves an old love, safeguarding a dreadful secret.

About The Reviewer

Karis Watie's picture
Real name: 

Karis Watie is a screenwriter from Texas who was accidentally transplanted in New England. She copes with the weather by closely studying television shows and thinking up more dramatic ways to develop characters in her own scripts. She tried the spotlight and it wasn't for her because she...Read more

About The Writer

Jeremy Storey's picture
Real name: 

I've been writing on-and-off most of my life. I've written Feature length screenplays, as well as award-winning Short screenplays and Stage plays. For me, writing is a form of catharsis. I love to creatively explore emotions, characters, and worlds. It's a place where I lose a sense of time, as...Read more

Heritage - It's Time to Learn From Your Elders, Boy!

Heritage
A good for nothing southerner feels the world owes him something.
But his great great great granddaddy will soon change his mind. Time and death can’t stop fate!

Admit it, racial tensions aren’t funny. But sometimes you have to laugh - or you’ll cry at the stupidity of some folks. In Heritage, Travis Sharp creates humor out of just that sort of prickly topic; squeezing laughter out of pain.

Buford (30s) is unrepentant. An overweight, unemployed layabout; faking an injury because he doesn’t want to work. Yet Buford has time and energy for things he considers important – like putting up a confederate flag on the building his great, great, great, granddaddy built.

Not to mention hanging out with pal Earl in his trailer – drinking, smoking and bewailing the wrongs of the world.

But thanks to some unexpected visitors, all that’s about to change.

First, it’s not-so-friendly policeman Bill, who orders Buford to stop antagonizing his neighbors, and flying the Confederate Flag in their face.  But fueling tension’s Buford’s pride and joy. He swears the law won’t hold him down!  Especially when Southern identity and Heritage are on the line….

Which is when Visitor #2 pays a call: Buford’s great, great, great, granddaddy Pappy… a decorated Confederate soldier from the Civil War –  now dead over a 150 years!  And as Buford’s about to discover, that much time makes a ghost very opinionated… and wise:

Pappy rubs his chin and shakes his head.

PAPPY
You don’t have work and you don’t serve in the militia.  How do you earn your wage, my boy?

BUFORD
Well, I get a check from work comp and my wife works at the post office... She got a nice union job.

Pappy jumps back and pulls his sword out.

PAPPY
Your wife is forced to work for the Union?

The exchange that follows between the Buford generations is anything but civil.  But funny and informative as Hell.

A fightin’ man even in his grave, Pappy quickly realizes it’s the future he’s fighting for – even if he has to force his no-good descendents to behave!

If you’ve enjoyed shows like My Name is Earl or Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure, then this here’s the script you’ve been a searchin’ for.

Chock full of sharp dialogue, Heritage has super simple locations and would be a pleasure to cast. Trust an old script soldier: this is a skit independent filmmakers will be fighting battles over, even long after the war’s no more than History!

The Script

Heritage

A young man from Alabama who feels his southern heritage is under attack magically speaks with a long dead ancestor and learns that honoring his family name extends beyond flag waving. (updated 7/1/17)

About The Reviewer

Elaine Clayton's picture
Real name: 

A writer of scripts and plays of different lengths and genres. Based in the U.K. and currently doing a Masters focused on crafting a family Christmas movie - Evil Mrs Claus.
Other work includes:
Developing a sitcom called Shelf Life with mentor and Script Editor, Peter Vincent....Read more

About The Writer

Travis Sharp's picture
Real name: 

I am an everyday father, husband, and medical professional who was born to be a writer. I waited for many years to follow that calling and now I am constantly learning, adapting, and networking to pursue the dream. I have a completed feature length, dark comedy that has received quite positive...Read more

Poultice - Life... Has No Price

Poultice
A prairie woman will do anything to keep her unborn child alive.

There is a period of time in American History - at least according to Hollywood - simply known as "The Old West." 

Here you will find stagecoach robberies,  gold in them thar hills,  gunfights at high noon, and lest we forget,  cowboys and Indians.  We all have our favorite Westerns such as "True Grit," "Gunfight at the OK Corral," or more recently, "Unforgiven," and "Pale Rider."  

It's a genre unique to The United States because it's a reflection of our nation's history.

"Poultice,"  written by Anthony Cawood, is that rare quiet Western.   An emotional drama that packs the same punch as a bar room brawl at the local saloon. 

Annie Knox is a prairie woman who desperately wants to have a baby.  She is a woman in her thirties, and after five still-born births, time and odds are running out.  Annie will do anything to keep her unborn child alive.

Annie risks everything for her baby when she ventures into Native American territory in search of a mythical poultice.

Upon arrival to the Indian village,  Annie finds herself face to face with Pauwau, an Indian woman who holds the secret of the poultice. 

But, there is bad blood between them.  Years before, Annie's father killed Pauwau's husband and stole their land.  Annie is eager to trade the land for the poultice, but Pauwau stands firm.  Such an insulting offer will do nothing to return her husband to her and her children.   Or, could it?

"Poultice" is a small drama packed with emotion.   Anthony Cawood's story and dialogue ring true, and feel just as much a part of our American history as Wyatt Earp. 

Directors who are searching for a Western without the big budget should definitely belly up to the bar .

Budget and Requirements:  Small.  Location is key for that "old West" look.   Costumes are equally important. And, of course, two serious dramatic actresses.

The Script

Poultice

A desperate mother to be must trade with the Native American wise woman that her family wronged many years ago.

About The Reviewer

David Troop's picture
Real name: 

Dave Troop began writing as soon as he could hold a No. 2 pencil.

In 2012, he discovered the beauty and the challenge of the five page screenplay while writing short scripts for MoviePoet.com and Simplyscripts.

Dave continues to write and review short scripts for Script...Read more

About The Writer

Anthony Cawood's picture
Real name: 

Award-winning screenwriter with one feature in post-production, two further features optioned and currently working on a thriller which will shoot in late 2017 in Nigeria. In addition to features, he has over forty short scripts produced/sold/optioned - including eight filmed.
Also pens...Read more

For the Articles - Just ONE of the Reasons You'll Read This!!

FOR THE ARTICLES
JOHN ROBBINS & TIM WESTLAND

A struggling writer reluctantly accepts a job at a porn magazine.
When people begin reading the magazine “for her articles”,
a rival magazine publisher schemes to expose her and ruin her career.

Aspiring writer, Molly Cadillac, has scored the job interview of her dreams.  Though she’s barely inside the prestigious Lily Park offices before she finds herself on the wrong side of its resident Machiavelli, Victoria Munro.  Finding a window in her schedule, Victoria promptly decides to sabotage Molly’s chances of success.  Because, well, that's what Victoria does best.

A dejected Molly returns to the suburbs, determined to find a way to get her articles published.  It’s a chance encounter with her boyfriend’s porn stash that leads Molly to the offices of Bennet Joy, editor-in-chief of adult magazine Primed.  Bennet takes a shine to Molly and offers her a job filling the white space between centre-folds with low rent erotica.  With bills to pay and a surrogate family to provide for, Molly accepts; quickly learning to navigate the world of Primed and its eccentric assortment of porn industry lifers.

BENNETT 
And here is why the door is red and
we have so many rules. Molly, 
meet Martin, our resident cartoonist 
and human resources nightmare.

When Bennet promotes Molly to Story Editor she sees an opportunity to get her musings into print.  Even if it is under a pseudonym and sandwiched between the coconut-oiled offerings of Mona, Montage and Taffy...

And when Molly’s articles prove an unexpected hit, Primed finds itself thrust into the limelight.  Much to the envy of its high-brow rivals and the ever scheming Victoria who has her own ideas about Molly’s literary future...

Johnny Robbins and Tim Westland’s pilot episode For The Articles finds its fish out of water, Molly Cadillac, caught between the cutthroat ego and insecurity of the literary elite and the colorful characters doomed to anonymity in the basement world of adult glossies.  With its snappy dialogue and offbeat characters For The Articles sets Molly on course for a series of misadventures in life, love and pornography.  A fast moving and memorable 49 pages with the promise of more to come.  Read and enjoy.

The Script

For The Articles

A struggling writer reluctantly accepts a job at a porn magazine. When people begin reading the magazine “for her articles”, a rival magazine publisher schemes to expose her and ruin her career.

About The Reviewer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 

Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount...Read more

About The Writer

Tim Westland's picture
Real name: 

Howdy... my name is Tim Westland.

I am an award winning writer, with multiple feature and short scripts placing highly in Page, Screencraft, BlueCat and other well respected competitions. Several of my short scripts have been produced, most recently “For The Love of God”, a topical LGBT-...Read more

Imagination, Smagination - Discovering the Truth Can Kill You (With Laughter)

IMAGINATION, SMAGINATION 
Little boys have crazy imaginations… Or do they?

 The topic for today is Monsters. Mwa-ha-ha -haaaa!

In his inaugural address, F.D. Roosevelt famously paraphrased Francis Bacon’s line by saying: The only thing we have to fear… is fear itself.

I don’t know about you, but I’ve always found cold comfort in that line… Fear itself is pretty darned scary.

Monsters, ghouls, devils, demons, the boogeyman – all strike fear into the most hardened of hearts and can turn even the most cast-iron of stomachs to jelly. From Ghoulies to Gremlins, to Chucky (Child's Play) and The Babadoo - monsters not only have a long and illustrious history on film but they continue to fascinate, disgust, horrify, and if the writer is especially talented (like this one is) even make their audiences laugh.

Now cast your mind back to your five-year-old self lying in bed in the dark - your nightlight casting ominous shadows onto the walls, your super-hero bed-covers pulled up tightly around your chin, wide eyes darting back and forth into the foreboding darkness.

What was that?!

Did you hear that barely perceptible creak across the floorboard? Did you see that lightning-fast flash of movement just out of the corner of your eye? What about that inky black cavern that is your wardrobe with its door slightly ajar, or that cavernous space under your bed where all manner of dastardly things could be lying in wait, ready to pounce when you least expect it.

Ooh, it’s enough to give you the heebie-jeebies, make you crawl into the fetal position, yank those bed covers over your head while you mutter over and over and over again:not real, not real, not real, in a desperate attempt to prove to yourself that what you just heard, what you just saw, was all just the result of a bad dream or an overactive imagination.

But what if it wasn’t your imagination…?

As we open on Nolan Bryand’s, Imagination, Smagination, this is the very real dilemma facing five-year-old Owen. He’s just run the five-metre dash down the hallway and into his parent’s bedroom. What he knows is: this is not his imagination in overdrive. There’s a Monster in his closet, and he needs his dad to get rid of it! Actually, he’d prefer to sleep in his Mom and Dad’s room, where there is no monster, but they’re not having it. Big sigh. Thanks, Mom. Thanks, Dad.

The Monster in The Closet and The Monster Under The Bed are familiar tropes in horror fiction and filmmaking, but Nolan Bryand’s rendition is about to surprise, not only with its freshness and originality, but also with its perfectly timed comic-horror twists. That's right, not one, but two. Just when you think the story’s done and dusted, Nolan expertly hits his audience with yet another comical twist in the final seconds of a denouement that will have you jumping in surprise and laughing out loud at the same time.

Suspense, comedy, acerbic wit, mixed with clever barbs aimed squarely at jaded grown-ups with their all too familiar rationalizing that ‘monsters don’t exist', Imagination, Smagination is a finely orchestrated monster-lite tale that is sure to be a crowd pleaser for kids and adults alike.

Filmmakers: Now's the time to banish your fears, scare up your own special brand of cinematic 'smagination' and take your best shot in the dark. Best not sleep on it though, cause this one's gonna’ get snapped up fast.

LOW BUDGET

One location.

Two adults, a plucky talented five year old, and a couple of ‘monsters'.

A talent for gruesome make-up fx. will also come in handy.

The Script

About The Reviewer

L. Chambers's picture
Real name: 

L.Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She currently...Read more

About The Writer

Nolan Bryand's picture
Real name: 

I've been interested in movies for as long as I can remember. While in university, I enrolled in film studies and took a particular interest in script writing. The idea of creating a story from a small thought in my head really appealed to me. I know the directors and actors are the ones...Read more

The Chocolatier - Murder: Served up Dark and Sweet

The Chocolatier
Two detectives must investigate a killer, but mystery is not as sweet as it seems…

The ‘game’s a foot’ in The Chocolatier - a Victorian England whydunnit; one with a sweet n’ savory edge.  If you’re into Sherlock Holmes mysteries, this should be right up your cobbled street.

Frank and Edward are two detectives hunting a serial killer… as good detectives are wont to do.  At least, until a mysterious note is delivered to them, from a just-as-mysterious Jacob Stiles.

The epitome of a man scorned, Jacob has been adding a secret ingredient to his delicious chocolate truffles – ones that’ve been selling like hot-cakes as of late.

Luring the detectives to his shop, Jacob confesses to Frank and Edward that his first victim - wife Rose – couldn’t resist a nibble now and then.  Needless to say, most revenge is best served cold. Cool, calculated and skilled in his art, Jacob has more not-so-sweet surprises in store.

And so begins the game of cat and mouse. Who will be Jacob’s final victim? Frank or Edward? Or someone else? Most importantly, what is Jacob’s true motive? To serve up “true desserts”… or does he simply “hunger” to kill?

If you’re in the mood for a detective story with a taste for intrigue, window-shop The Chocolatier.  You may find it’s just your taste!!

About the reviewer:
Elaine Clayton is a London-based screenwriter, who has written several well received shorts and is currently doing a Masters in Play and Scriptwriting. Comfortable in a broad range of genres, Elaine has an innate sense of structure and arc development. Contact her at Elaine_clayton(AT) hotmail(.)co(.)uk

The Script

The Chocolatier

While the streets of London are being stalked by the blade of a serial killer, two detectives must investigate a strange note left at the station.

About The Reviewer

Elaine Clayton's picture
Real name: 

A writer of scripts and plays of different lengths and genres. Based in the U.K. and currently doing a Masters focused on crafting a family Christmas movie - Evil Mrs Claus.
Other work includes:
Developing a sitcom called Shelf Life with mentor and Script Editor, Peter Vincent....Read more

About The Writer

Anthony Hudson's picture
Real name: 

I've been writing on and off for around 10 years now and mainly write comedy, but have ventured into horror and drama too. I've written over 25 short scripts, with a number being produced. My features total 5 with a few more being worked on. Not only do I love writing but I also...Read more

All the Fives - And None of the Luck

All the Fives
A burned-out cabbie seeking fortune may have just hit the jackpot.

Working for tips.  Same dead-end job for years.  Growing debt. Minor addictions to help cope with the stress of trying to make ends meet.  Who hasn’t fantasized about winning the lottery?

Mitch, the protagonist of Steve Miles’ All the Fives, sure has. A taxi driver for years, he’s into sport betting.  Consequently, he pays more attention to the games than he does to the road, having given up on the idea of ever getting a handle on his finances through an honest day’s work. 

The film opens with Mitch in his cab, listening to a game.  He has a lot riding on the Black and Gold and has no desire to pick up a fare at the moment.  So, he’s understandably irritated when a man approaches the cab and gets in.  But, money’s money, so Mitch makes sure he makes the most of it: he takes advantage of his passenger’s altered state by driving endlessly as the meter runs wild. 

The taxi driver soon realizes however, that his passenger isn’t just out of it, he’s wounded, seriously wounded.  Not one to pass up an opportunity, the cabbie makes a wager that could change his life forever.  He quickly rummages through the stranger’s bag.  Score!  Wads of cash!

Reveling in his sudden good fortune, Mitch now just has to figure out what to do with the body.  Or so he believes. The man in the backseat stirs, and the stakes of this game just got raised way beyond what Mitch—or the audience--could ever have imagined.

If you love tales with twists that tease and torment—like Twilight Zone meets Reservoir Dogs— you really should come along for the ride that All the Fives has to offer. 

 

The Script

All The Fives

An indebted cabby stumbles on an opportunity to reverse his fortunes when he finds a duffel full of money. But first, what to do with the dead passenger it belongs to?

About The Reviewer

Julia Cottle's picture
Real name: 

Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing.Read more

About The Writer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 

Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount...Read more

Man's Best Friend - And You Better Treat Him Right

MAN’S BEST FRIEND
Three days after a couple’s beloved dog goes missing, a phone call arrives that will change the game. Forever.

Put aside whether you’re a dog person or cat person just for a moment and focus on the incomparable talents of Man’s Best Friend, and why mutts have earned this most eminent title.

Ready…?

Guide dogs, guard dogs, sniffer dogs, therapy dogs, herding, hunting, tracking and cadaver dogs, bomb, drug, and chemical detection dogs; dogs of war, dogs who can sniff out cancer – dogs who rescue their owners from burning buildings and rolling rapids… And that’s just to name a few of their talents. Add to that, unconditional loyalty and love, goopy grins, sloppy kisses and perennially wagging tails, and really – the ‘elegant tramp’, (as one of my friends labels felines), is really not much competition, now is it?

From Rin-Tin-Tin and Lassie to the memorably cute but a lil’ fugly Verdell in As Good As It Gets, it’s no wonder dogs have an illustrious celluloid history, in both leading roles and as sidekicks.

Okay, now picture this:

You’re wandering down the street, minding your own business, and you look up to see MISSING, LOST DOG, or REWARD, stamped across a poster and nailed to a telegraph pole. Typically a photo of said AWOL pooch looks dolefully and adorably into the camera. Aww, so sad, and guaranteed to tug at the ol’ heartstrings.

This is also the opening scene of Steven Clark’s screenplay, Man’s Best Friend.

But hang on now, cause if you’re thinking this is going to be a cute fluffy-dog piece think again. Curt and Cassie, a couple in their thirties (he’s a cop btw) have just received a rather ominous telephone call and discovered there’s a bounty to be paid on Ranger, their missing ‘family member’ – and a rather hefty ransom demand.

MAN (V.O.)
We have your dog. …
He’s got nice teeth. But I’ve got
pliers. … $10,000 dollars for the mutt. Cash. Or
I start playing dentist.

Eww! Marathon Dog, anyone?

To say anything further would spoil the fun, the suspense, and the very, very, dark twists and turns of this piece. Suffice to say this tail (sorry, tale) is less for lovers of Marley And Me , and more for fans of teeth baring, and snarling Cujo, and Seven Psychopaths.

Dare I say, if you’ve got a nose for talent you can call off your search right now cause with Man’s Best Friend you’ll definitely be barking up the right tree.

The Script

Man's Best Friend

Three days after a couple's beloved dog goes missing, a phone call arrives that will change the game. Forever.

About The Reviewer

L. Chambers's picture
Real name: 

L.Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She currently...Read more

About The Writer

Steven Clark's picture
Real name: 

A writer since 13, I began screenwriting four years ago as a more direct outlet for my creativity. Since then, I've had two short scripts produced, and two more optioned. My writing style is subtle and understated, yet powerful in its emotional simplicity. I'm currently collaborating...Read more

Tower of Strength - Can You Climb to the Heights?

Tower of Strength
Good Guys vs. Bad Guys isn’t always well-defined…

Nothing’s more intense than a good cop story.

Crime tales have built-in tension. There are always good guys – usually the police. And the Bad Guys run the gamut of Evil: one hundred and fifty Shades of “grey”. For anyone who loves such gritty tales, you can usually expect one pivotal scene: usually with three ingredients – a cop, an interrogation room, and a suspect.

And the conflict goes wild from there.

The good cop in Jeremy Storey’s Tower of Strength is a detective named Peter. When TOS opens, Peter has suspect Alex in custody – imprisoned in a cramped interrogation room. As Peter turns his tape recorder on, the lightning quick questions begin.

PETER
Please state your name for the record.

ALEX
Alex Barnes.

PETER
Where do you live?

ALEX
456 Dorchester.

PETER
Where do you work?

ALEX
Crescent Security.

Sound familiar? Well, just you wait.

Because, just about the time you think Peter may elicit that confession of guilt: “Peter’s voice starts to fade. Alex looks over his shoulder to the outside. He’s no longer listening… just looking at the sky” …

The next scene describes Alex “tightening a few bolts” on his son Ben’s new bicycle. And hence the tragic flashback begins…

What’s the “gotcha” of this story?

Well, Peter’s got a grisly murder to solve. He thinks – in fact, he’s damn certain — that this “ruggedly handsome, athletic” father is somehow involved in the bloody mix.

So who exactly has been killed?

No spoiler here: but there are bad cartel guys across the border. A gang of murderous thugs and monsters that take-no-prisoners-alive.

PETER
These ‘monsters’ are like locusts. For every one put away or put down another three will appear. For every eye they take two. They fear no one.

ALEX
You’re worried about retaliation?

PETER
It’ll be a bloodbath.

Absolutely. Alex is a guy with a different agenda – one he keeps very close to his chest. Will Peter be able to solve the murderous crime? Does he even have the right suspect?

Maybe, maybe not… And for folks who love crime stories, that mystery’s the juicy part. 

Are you a director on the hunt for a riveting drama – one with adrenaline-pumping tension and pace? Then TOS could be your fix. It doesn’t get much better than this…

The Script

Tower of Strength

A distraught father with a violent past takes justice into his own hands, after his son is accidentally killed in the cross-fire between rival gangs.

About The Reviewer

KP Mackie's picture
Real name: 

Uber reader/reviewer.
Enjoy reading all genres. Former member of MoviePoet, where I read over 2,000 scripts.
Love writing animated scripts, historical-fiction, and westerns when I'm not reading or researching new story ideas.
So many ideas, so little time... :)

...Read more

About The Writer

Jeremy Storey's picture
Real name: 

I've been writing on-and-off most of my life. I've written Feature length screenplays, as well as award-winning Short screenplays and Stage plays. For me, writing is a form of catharsis. I love to creatively explore emotions, characters, and worlds. It's a place where I lose a sense of time, as...Read more

Solitaire - A Game for One... or More?

Solitaire
A troubled loner is about to get a second chance. And maybe more…

In the final act of Steven Clark’s screenplay ‘Solitaire’, main character Randy makes the following comment:

RANDY
They say this game mimics life.
Ladders, chutes. Up, down. Everything
by chance.

This poses the question: Are the cards we’re dealt in life pre-determined, or is the game of life just a random result of luck and fate? Similarly, does playing by the rules, employing strategic maneuvers, knowing when to show your hand and when to keep your cards close to your chest ensure a better result in this game of life?

Steven Clarke’s characters Randy and Amy have been playing by the rules all of their lives. Randy washes dishes in a small-town diner. Amy is a waitress. During his breaks Randy can be found sitting at a table at the back idling away at his favorite card game: Solitaire – or Patience, as he likes to call it.

We get the impression life up until now has been a bit of a struggle for Randy. We know he’s recently returned from a stint in the military and has suffered some sort of trauma. Some might call him damaged goods… As a result, for the most part, he keeps his head down and his mouth shut.

Amy’s also doing it tough as a single mom supporting her daughter.

That she’s attracted to Randy is no secret, but Randy is so painfully shy he can’t even look Amy in the eye. Seems these two might be destined to be ships passing in the night…

We can tell by this line however:

Randy’s gaze follows her as she hip-checks through a swinging
door, out into the dining room.

So there’s still hot blood coursing through Randy’s veins. And Amy’s indomitable spirit ensures Randy’s brooding dark horse personality and solitary habits are not going to put her off.

Amy’s decided today is the day. She’s worked up the courage and she’s going to make her move. Brazenly, she steps up to the table where Randy’s playing his game and asks him for a date. Just like that. Game on.

Of course, as with all good dramas, things don’t exactly go according to plan. Having given his home a long overdue spit and polish, and donned a nice white shirt and tie, Randy sits down at the kitchen table to wait…

And wait… and wait…

Never has the dial on the kitchen clock ticked by more slowly, and still no sign of Amy.

It appears she may have just thrown a dummy move that no-one could see coming.

Then, just when you think game over, there’s a knock at the door.

Is Randy about to discover that Patience is indeed a virtue? That gambling on love, one of the highest-stakes games of all, is worth it? If he gets it wrong, it could be a falling house of cards. Then again, as the saying goes…You’ve got to be in it to win it, right?

With echoes of Frankie and Johnny, and It Could Happen To You, Steven Clark paints a very moving tale with Solitaire about two people searching for meaning in their lives, and that all important love connection.

Filmmakers: Know a good deal – I mean screenplay – when you see one? Don’t you dare leave this one to chance. After all, this could be that all important game changer.

The Script

Solitaire

A troubled loner is about to get a second chance, and maybe more.

About The Reviewer

L. Chambers's picture
Real name: 

L.Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She currently...Read more

About The Writer

Steven Clark's picture
Real name: 

A writer since 13, I began screenwriting four years ago as a more direct outlet for my creativity. Since then, I've had two short scripts produced, and two more optioned. My writing style is subtle and understated, yet powerful in its emotional simplicity. I'm currently collaborating...Read more

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