Shootin' The Shorts | Script Revolution

Shootin' The Shorts

Shootin' The Shorts is run by J.E. Clarke a longtime prolific screenwriter who loves to give others a little boost in the marketplace by highlighting why she believes their short script may stand out. She brings with her a loyal band of readers who share the same compassionate attitude who have joined her cause as it's grown and grown to connect writers with filmmakers on a monthly basis. Now it finds a home here on Script Revolution.

This is all about highlighting what makes a script great by focusing on the positives. You'll find no negative criticism or lists of issues here. Submitting a short script for consideration couldn't be easier, simply scroll down to the bottom of your script edit page and tick the "Submit to Shootin' The Shorts" checkbox. Please note; it takes time to get through all submissions, everything is subjective, and we're by no means saying these are the best short scripts on Script Revolution, they are simply the ones that have found an admirer within this section - CJ

Maybe Not Mars - some vacations aren't what they're cracked up to be

MAYBE NOT MARS
An astronaut on Mars searches for the cure for a new kind of boredom.

Space travel to Mars, a dream held by Elon Musk, Brian Blessed, and Richard Branson amongst others, is brought to life in this hilarious short from Brandon Stephens.

Whilst the red planet used to hold visions of small green men and earth like promises, our protagonist, Jimmy, has landed and struggles with the reality this god forsaken dust bowl presents. Having had his research equipment burned in the atmosphere on entry, his one remaining purpose is to survive...the boredom.

Armed with a variety of tools to keep himself entertained (a kite shaped like a shark and a jazz mag amongst others), Jimmy fights the tedium of being the only human form on the face of this planet. What he lacks in human company, however, is not lacking from the world of robotics.

Every castaway needs his Wilson and Jimmy has his in the form of a flying Mars rover. Whilst Tom Hanks was kept sane by his volleyball friend, it’s hard to tell if Jimmy’s rover is keeping him sane or sending on a one way ticket to the mental institute, but a definite relationship between man and machine is expertly crafted on the page by the author.

Jimmy is running...from a KITE. The hand in the air holds the string. As he runs, a shark shaped kite flies in the air behind him. He kicks up dust, moving swiftly.

Well, of course, Jimmy trips. BAM, he slaps the dirt. His head rests on the red dirt. His face sweats beneath his clear face mask. His eyes stare forward.

JIMMY (V.O.)
I know what you're thinking.
Yes, that is a kite.
Yes, I'm on Mars.

Jimmy heaves himself up slightly, dirt covers him. Defeated, the shark kite wavers to the ground in front of him, pathetic. He sits up.

JIMMY (V.O.)
It's conditions such as these –
monotony, idleness, tedium,
sensory deprivation, loneliness.
That is what the NASA psychologists said.
THAT was their concern. I call it boredom.

JIMMY
Did you catch that?

He looks over at a MARS FLYING ROVER. This simple little hovering drone beast with it's stupid little camera head just stares at him.

Showing boredom on a page always runs the risk of being boring itself, but Maybe Not Mars is an effortless read that always entertains. With the maddening isolation of Castaway, the setting of The Martian and the comedic tones of an Apatow classic, this script will guarantee laughs that cut through the monotony of our red soiled sister planet.

Whether you are a sci-fi fanatic, comedy seeker or just want to find a good short screenplay to keep yourself entertained, Maybe Not Mars won’t let you down. Brandon’s writing style coupled with his exceptionally well crafted visuals make for a must read for any producer or director who is looking for their next short to work on.

The Script

Maybe Not Mars

An astronaut on Mars searches for the cure for a new kind of boredom.

About The Reviewer

Cam Gray's picture
Real name: 

By day a 3d visualiser, by night an aspiring screenwriter.

My work varies from dramatic feature films, to surreal comedy shorts, with a little bit of television work thrown into the mix. My goal is to have work produced by the right team for the individual script, if you think that's...Read more

About The Writer

Brandon Stephens's picture
Real name: 

Born and raised in Texas, I had an interest in films at an early age. I spent a lot of time begging my parents to rent all the Halloweens and Friday the 13ths at the local Movie Shack, and watching Big Trouble in Little China over and over with my brothers, when I could get a break from Star...Read more

Lyssa's Child - Childhood is never easy...

LYSSA’S CHILD
A psychologist records the daily life of a recluse who claims to be stalked by a malign entity.

A well written script can capture a reader with words and make them feel every movement and emotion within a piece. Lyssa’s Child is such a work.

With an absorbing style, author Steve Miles has crafted an exceptional short horror/drama. Through his vivid writing style we feel genuine emotions of fear, intrigue, loss and pity, which pull the reader into this screenplay and refuse to let them go.

We open on a phone call where our protagonist, Duncan, is being brutally attacked in the street by someone. Duncan is a mysterious character who’s layers are slowly peeled back by psychologist, Edith Moore, throughout the piece.

Through her patient questioning, Edith probes gently at the fragile man that sits in front of her. Duncan is a ball of bruises and anguish, one that is likely to be cast aside by another professional, but she wants to help this mentally scarred and tormented individual.

As Duncan starts to let Edith in, he leads her through his past life and into his present. His family upbringing was not without love, but there is something that seemed to have haunted them. That same something now stalks Duncan, keeping him on his toes and not allowing our protagonist to let his guard down for a moment. Edith, through her kindness and dedication to her patient, is brought into his life and will witness first hand the terror and torment that stalks him.

Duncan heaps several spoons of sugar into his mug.

DUNCAN
Dad never had rules, he just took to hiding.

DR. MOORE (O.S.)
Did he ever talk about it?

DUNCAN
The war hadn’t left him with much to say.
See it in his eyes, he were just...gone.
One day he weren’t there at all--

A cuckoo bursts from the clock above Duncan -- CUCKOO!

DUNCAN
Shit off!

He’s on his feet, poised to strike. The bird slowly draws back into the clock-face.

DR. MOORE (O.S.)
Duncan it’s okay, you’re safe--

DUNCAN
You don’t know safe.

In lesser hands a screenplay such as this could descend into the usual generic tropes, but through the expert writing of the author the script is an excellent read. Steve’s work moves in different directions, dragging the reader with it, the pace rising and falling, the tone darkening and lightening, and we feel genuine sympathy for Duncan and his struggle against his tormentor.

If you are a producer or director and are looking for a drama/horror script that can leave an impression on an audience and be made on a budget, then look no further. Lyssa’s Child is an exceptional short script that is just waiting for someone to bring Duncan and his story to the screen.

The Script

Lyssa's Child

A psychologist records the daily life of a recluse who claims to be stalked by a malign entity.

About The Reviewer

Cam Gray's picture
Real name: 

By day a 3d visualiser, by night an aspiring screenwriter.

My work varies from dramatic feature films, to surreal comedy shorts, with a little bit of television work thrown into the mix. My goal is to have work produced by the right team for the individual script, if you think that's...Read more

About The Writer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 

Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount...Read more

The Tasting Room - Bursting with Humor (Flavor, too!)

The Tasting Room
When an urbane couple visits his tasting room for a flight, a hapless attendant
struggles to make heads or tails of their poetic, pretentious and scathing wine tasting notes.

If you enjoy wine and quirky comedies, you've probably seen the movie Sideways, starring Paul Giamatti as a curmudgeonly author, who also fancies himself a wine connoisseur. Many of the film's funnier passages of dialog involve his character Miles Raymond musing on the taste and aroma of various wines.

MILES
A little citrus. Maybe some strawberry. Mmm.
Passion fruit, mmm, and, oh, there's just like the
faintest soupçon of like, uh, asparagus, and, there's a,
just a flutter of, like a, like a nutty Edam cheese.

Now, if you thought he was a rather pretentious prig, then you've yet to meet Ian and Cassandra, the pompous ‘life-partners’ at the center of the charming short screenplay, The Tasting Room by Steve Cleary.

Together, they make Miles of Sideways seem like rather intellectually reasonable and emotionally well-adjusted member of society. Same can't be said of Cassandra and Ian, as they embark on a metaphor infused wine tasting session at what is presumably a winery of some sort.

From the get-go, it's clear that they're not exactly from around here...

ATTENDANT
Come in from out of town?

IAN
We're denizens of the city.

CASSANDRA
Yes, the city.

ATTENDANT
Oh yeah? Los Angeles? San Francisco?

IAN
Oxnard.

Subjected to ministering to this courtly couple is perhaps the real hero of our story; the tasting room Attendant. A more warm, knowledgeable, and accommodating sommelier you're unlikely to find.

Regardless of the gibbering eloquence and verbose vexation of his guests, the Attendant remains steadfast in his trusty role as a discerning taste guide...

ATTENDANT
This is from last year's harvest, with notes
of grapefruit, gooseberry, and fresh-cut grass.
Enjoy.

Despite his best efforts to match a wine to the palette of his guests, the Attendant continuously comes up short, as Ian and Cassandra seem to become increasingly irritated as they evaluate the taste of each glass presented to them.

IAN
Ahh, a sultry sprite swirling on a slipper flower.

Cassandra throws him a dirty look and calmly spits the wine into the pour bucket.

CASSANDRA
Meh. A turgid troll twerking on a twig.

As they progress through each tasting, our pouty partners up the ante of their metaphorical descriptions... clearly using their musings as a piquant proxy to air out a variety of grievances, in a way that only the most waspish of society would likely understand.

When all is said and done, will the Attendant finally uncork his patience and show Ian and Cassandra the door? Or will the 'life partners' finally find a complimentary taste to overcome their bottled-up bitterness, and in doing so, rediscover the flavor of love?

In a similar vernacular used by wine mavens all over the world, this is a darkly amusing script that is, short but deep. Simple yet complex. Bitter yet flowery.  So, curl up on the couch, pour yourself a merlot, or a chardonnay, or a zinfandel and then quench your creative thirst with this wonderfully eclectic script that is ideal for the auteur craving to produce something quirky, droll, and dialog-driven.

The Script

The Tasting Room

When an urbane couple visits his tasting room for a flight, a hapless attendant struggles to make heads or tails of their poetic, pretentious and scathing wine tasting notes.

About The Reviewer

Jeremy Storey's picture
Real name: 

Jeremy Storey, originally hails from the United Kingdom, but now resides in Seattle, WA. He first discovered the joys of writing at school, penning short stories and collaborating on comic books with his friends. Coming from a writerly family, it was clearly in his DNA to tell stories. However,...Read more

About The Writer

Steve Cleary's picture
Real name: 

Hi, thanks for stopping by. My body of work consists of original features, shorts, and comedy sketches. My comedy background comes from my time in the NYC stand-up comic scene, where I helped up-and-coming talent develop their acts. I also wrote and performed in various short films and sketches...Read more

Edie - You Get What You Pay For...

Edie
A male sex worker was up for anything… until he met Edie.

There’s probably always been a lot of sex had outside of romantic relationships.  But, over the past couple of decades much of the stigma attached to casual relationships and even hookups has faded.  The number of apps available to facilitate sexual encounters with strangers is an indication of their prevalence.  It’s therefore surprising that nearly half of all people who engage in casual sex, have said that they would like the sex to develop into a more serious relationship.

Darryl, the protagonist of Chris Courtney Martin’s Edie, is not one of those people.  A skilled and versatile sex worker, Darryl does it for money. 

The script opens with Darryl engaged in a graphic S & M encounter with John. Several minutes later, counting a wad of bills, and smoking a cigarette on the balcony of the rundown motel, Darryl notices Edie staring at him.  She’s a bit frumpy, but not bad-looking.  Darryl’s ready to get back to work. 

Within moments the two are inside Edie’s room.  She tells Darryl that it’s her birthday.  He offers her a birthday special.

EDIE
Two-fifty?

DARRYL
Yep. That's my Birthday Girl Special. You got that on you?

Edie nods.

EDIE
In the drawer.

Darryl crosses to the bedside table, opens the drawer.

A rainbow Velcro wallet sits inside. He picks it up, looks at Edie--

She nods, grants him permission.

He opens it up, takes out the bills, counts them. They add up to $250, even.

DARRYL
Well, well. Looks like this was meant to be.

Edie’s thoughts exactly. 

She seems so frightened and inexperienced that Darryl willingly lets her take the lead.  However, the confidence he has of his own control over the situation quickly fades.  By the morning after, Edie will have changed Darryl’s entire understanding of life (and death) for the worse.

If you appreciate scripts that turn the tables on the ones who think they have the upper hand, don’t pass up Edie.  She probably wouldn’t let you anyway.   

The Script

Edie

When a male escort takes a date with a lonely young woman, he uncovers a horrifying truth.

About The Reviewer

Julia Cottle's picture
Real name: 

Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing.Read more

About The Writer

Chris Courtney Martin's picture

I'm a writer. I'm a producer. I'm a thinker, dreamer, rebel. But most of all? I'm happy that the word-count minimum for these bios has been reduced. I would like to hope the work speaks for itself. I've been doing this for a long time and I've come to realize that at the end of the day, personal...Read more

Motion Sensor - Some Things are Best Left Unseen

Motion Sensor
An outdoor security light makes a homeowner feel suddenly less secure when it activates unexpectedly.

Motion sensors are like night lights… for adults. 

When plugged in (and working right), they enable us to see through dismal shadows. They ease every fear we harbor, regarding what prowls around under the cloak of night.

Including closets. Unlit bedrooms. And the backyard ‘round midnight.  But when a noise frightens us – is it always wise to uncover the source of that sound?

In Anthony Cawood’s “Motion Sensor,” we do find out. And greet an uninvited guest:  fear that grips us from beginning until bloody end.

Our story begins with tidy Bob heading into his dark kitchen – to place a cup in the sink.  But as our innocent hero will soon find out; simple acts of cleanliness sometimes lead to horrific mess:

The external light, outside bi-fold patio doors, pops on; flooding the kitchen in light.

Bob watches TIGGER, his ginger cat, pad across the patio.

BOB
Happy hunting.

The light clicks off...

Then on again.

No cat on the patio this time, it's empty, until...

A ginger shape streaks towards the window, hits with a dull THUD.

Tigger slides down the glass leaving a trail of blood and ginger gore.

BOB
What the...

He takes a step towards the glass doors.

The light clicks off again...

What horror do you think Bob will encounter next? Something that haunts you in your worst nightmares, waiting for night to come to life….

An evocative, easy shoot (except for Tigger’s “stunt”)Motion Sensor clocks in at two pages.  But even in that brief moment, it creates a lasting, fearful image that will forever haunt an audiences’ mind!

The Script

Motion Sensor

An outdoor security light makes this homeowner feel suddenly less secure when it starts to activate unexpectedly.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen short screenplays, three feature screenplays and two TV pilots. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood...Read more

About The Writer

Anthony Cawood's picture
Real name: 

Award-winning screenwriter with one feature produced and a further four features optioned or in pre-production. In addition to features, he has over forty short scripts produced/sold/optioned - including ten filmed. Also occasionally pens screenwriting articles, interviews with writers and...Read more

Snowbound - Through The Blizzard Clarity Is Found

Atmosphere, that's something I want to talk about here. It can be a hard task to deliver through words but Ra Inta turns that white expanse of page space into a snowy wilderness so vivid it will have you reaching for a coat. We open on a juxtaposed mixture of gritty wood chopping and a child (Charley) sledding, getting more and more reckless while protected by the guidance of his wise father (Bo).

We quickly learn that this is a father and son trapped in the conditions of their world with nothing but a cabin for comfort - a home that's absent of a mother.

CHARLEY
Dad, how much longer are we going 
to be here?

BO
Once it stops snowing, son. Once it 
stops. We’ll be all right.

Hope however quickly turns to horror as this supposed survival story twists into something more surreal. Bo and Charley run for it, fleeing their cabin as something ominous rumbles through their lives. They run to somewhere new. Somewhere forbidden. What they discover will surprise you just as much as them, and you'll probably "get it" just at the right moment.

This is a script which manages to build mystery and unfold it with a masterful pace, causing you to become increasingly fascinated with the explanation and meaning behind it all. I'm not going to spoil the surprise ending but that meaning is something we can all probably relate to right now. This is a clever commentary on our current political climate and, with that in mind, I encourage short filmmakers looking for something like this to act fast, strike while the iron is hot, and not be left out in the cold.

The Script

Snowbound

After escaping the snow, an idyllic childhood dramatically comes to an end -- in many ways.

About The Reviewer

CJ Walley's picture
Real name: 

I’m here for the gritty movies, the rebellious movies, the b-movies, those features that are here to be good old fashioned entertainment and pack a punch that’s a lot harder than their budgets would suggest.

I love pulp and exploitation, I like car chases and gunplay, but I also love...Read more

About The Writer

Ra Inta's picture
Real name: 

Ra cut his cinematic teeth at the Roughcut Film School in his homeland of rural New Zealand.

He has written and directed five short films, but would like to strengthen his writing game. He likes to explore narratives that sneak scientific concepts in a consumable way (he holds a PhD in...Read more

Make You Believe - and you will!

Make You Believe
A loud-mouthed professional skeptic is shaken after a psychic channels his late grandmother…

Good ol’ grandma’s advice rarely disappoints. Which isn’t at all surprising. Hard won wisdom from decades of life is what helps many a wise nana predict what’s best for her grandchildren - in sensible, logical ways.

But heeding your nana isn’t always logical – especially after she’s passed on. Would a skeptic listen then?  Elvira Drake’s “Make You Believe” asks that very question, and tells the eerie tale.

As the script opens, Damien Caine – psychic debunker – guest stars on George Hope’s Late Night TV show; head to head with nationally acclaimed psychic Gladys.  Needless to say, their chemistry isn’t good.

The debate gets ever more heated as time goes on:

GEORGE
So, Gladys, how certain are you of the other side?
That you're actually in communication with spirits?

GLADYS
Oh, one hundred percent! No question.

DAMIEN
(chuckles nastily)
Aaaand that's the problem!

GEORGE
How do you mean?

DAMIEN
One hundred percent, no question?!
She's telling us she doesn't question anything! She's absolutely certain.
People like her are incredibly fraudulent and the people who believe her are gullible.

Gladys shakes her head and tries not to look too bothered.

GEORGE
I'm sure, as a world-famous psychic medium, you've heard this argument before.

GLADYS
Many, many times. All these skeptics are like broken records. Very unoriginal. Never anything new to --

DAMIEN
(getting worked up)
We have to keep repeating ourselves because you people never give us a satisfying response.

GLADYS
I could capture a genie in a mason jar and it wouldn't be enough for you.
Skeptics are merely debunkers. It's like a cult.

DAMIEN
Well, genies aren't real, so...

GEORGE
(to Damien)
I think what she's saying is, no matter what evidence she presents to you,
you'll refuse to seriously consider it.

Let’s face it: in certain ways, Gladys is – shall we say – “dead on”?  Damien’s unlikely to consider new conclusions. But when Gladys channels his dear beloved – and departed – grandmother… will this hardened debunker see the light?

Perhaps (in a twisted way.)  We’d never want to ruin the surprise – so read the rest yourself and find out!

A stand-out satire short, "Make You Believe" gives readers and audiences a glimpse of both sides of the afterlife coin - concluding with a dark comedic turn that's sure to make believers out of us all!

 

 

The Script

Make You Believe

A loud-mouthed professional skeptic is shaken after a psychic channels his late grandmother who gives him a warning, which he doesn't heed, much to his detriment.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen short screenplays, three feature screenplays and two TV pilots. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood...Read more

About The Writer

Elvira Drake's picture
Real name: 

Hi, I’m Elvira Drake and I write fiction in the form of screenplays (shorts, features, and television specs), short stories, and novellas/novels. I have a B.A. in Film and Television Production with a minor in Philosophy from The University of Memphis.

I’m a fan of classic films,...Read more

Satnav - Where Might It Take You Next?

 SATNAV
 A woman’s infidelity takes her on an unexpected journey.

Hell Hath No Fury Like A Woman Scorned is how the old adage goes, but the latest research indicates men may in fact be sorer losers when it comes to love and war. Add twenty-first century technology into the mix as the latest weapon of revenge and things can get very dicey indeed.

In Anthony Cawood’s one-page thriller, Satnav, we open on 30-something, Sarah, driving along a deserted patch of road alone and late at night. Sarah’s just punched her location and presumably her destination into a high-tech device some of us like to call a Satnav - otherwise known as a GPS, or navigation assistant.

The question is: will she reach her destination?

She’s just received a text message from her husband, David, and he’s not happy.  Certain revelations regarding Sarah’s extra-curricular behaviour have come to light and it appears she has not been the model of a loving and faithful partner. As the text messages continue to come thick and fast and the Satnav guides Sarah on her journey we wonder will she make it to where she wants to go in one piece?

It’s no easy task to build suspense and create a fully fledged story in one-page but Anthony Cawood negotiates the twists and turns with skill and expertise in this tight micro-short thriller that’ll resonate and pack a punch with audiences.

Filmmakers: We know you have the drive and you’re dying to move off the starting blocks. All you need now is the vehicle. And here it is! Cut and polish in your own inimitable style and Satnav could be your short-cut to guaranteed success.

The Script

SatNav

A woman's infidelity takes her on an unexpected journey when her scorned husband hacks her car's navigation system.

About The Reviewer

L. Chambers's picture
Real name: 

L.Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She currently...Read more

About The Writer

Anthony Cawood's picture
Real name: 

Award-winning screenwriter with one feature produced and a further four features optioned or in pre-production. In addition to features, he has over forty short scripts produced/sold/optioned - including ten filmed. Also occasionally pens screenwriting articles, interviews with writers and...Read more

The Tooth Fairy: ...Smile!!!

THE TOOTH FAIRY
An enthusiastic young girl is about to learn the Tooth Fairy always exacts a price.

Childhood can be a magical time. Santa Clause and The Easter Bunny are the obvious standouts, but that special little nocturnal sprite we know as The Tooth Fairy, must also be given honourable mention.

Tinsel, fairy-dust, and chocolate eggs aside, it’s just a little bit creepy when you consider all three of these magical creatures come at night while we are sleeping.

Tradition has it when you lose your milk teeth as a child you should place the tooth  under your pillow just before you nod off to sleep. In the morning, if you’re lucky, and if you’ve been a good little girl or boy, you will wake to discover a delightful gift, usually one of the monetary kind - a small token symbolizing the beginning of your rite of passage from childhood into adulthood, courtesy of The Tooth Fairy.

Throughout history Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny are depicted in pretty consistent good-guy fashion. The Tooth Fairy however can appear in many different guises – as male, female, with wings or wand, as pixie, dragon, ballerina, bat or rat, and commonly mouse – even, (according to Wiki,) as a ‘potbellied flying man smoking a cigar’! Huh?

Now, that’s really creepy.

Not nearly as creepy and macabre however, as the depiction of the titular character in James Barron’s one-page horror thriller – The Tooth Fairy.

One-page scripts are no easy task for writers but James Barron manages to skilfully weave a fully rounded tale with a shocking twist all in one page.

We open on Minka Avery, an excitable six year old girl (with a gap-toothed smile) waving a twenty-dollar note in front of her parent’s faces.

Look what the Tooth Fairy left! She exclaims.

The astonished looks on both parent’s faces tell us neither one of them left such a gift.

They stare at each other a moment, confused.

So what’s going on here? Where did this little windfall come from?

And why are Dad’s new pliers missing?

Filmmakers, are you looking for a micro-short in the horror genre with a denouement that will make your audience’s toes curl?  Perhaps an entry for Shriekfest or Screamfest or one of the many other horror festivals going around? Well, look no further than James Barron’s, ‘The Tooth Fairy’. This is one tale you can definitely sink your teeth into.

The Script

The Tooth Fairy

An enthusiastic young girl is about to learn the Tooth Fairy always exacts a price.

About The Reviewer

L. Chambers's picture
Real name: 

L.Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She currently...Read more

About The Writer

James Barron's picture
Real name: 

I love to write comedy along with the occasional horror/thriller. My work is frequently showcased on Janet's Shootin' The Shorts Blog (which is now part of Script Revolution too!)

Feel free to check out more on my website:
http://...Read more

Go Fish - It Ain't No Game (Or is it?)

GO FISH
Two ten year old boys spend the evening in the family hunting cabin, playing cards and drinking beer.
It seems like fun until the reality of the day catches up with them.

When President Franklin Delano Roosevelt once famously stated: ‘The only thing we have to fear, is fear itself’, it applied to a time when the world was on the verge of being fully engulfed in the flames of conflict. It was about reminding people that if they can stay calm and manage their fear, that they will overcome the horrors of war.

But if you were to apply this quote to a horror film or monster movie, it takes on a different meaning; it becomes a fascinating anachronism when embodied by the central protagonists and how they cope with fear itself.

It’s night. It’s the 1930s. Meet Henry and Samuel, two 10-year old boys, camping out in a remote hunting cabin. Both are covered in blood and mud while surrounded by creepy stuffed animal trophies ghoulishly adorning the walls of the cabin. It’s unclear why they are there and why they’re in such a bedraggled state. But one thing is clear… they enjoy playing GO FISH, and love it even more, when the winning player gets a turn at sipping from a large bottle of beer.

Henry throws his cards back on the table and grumps.

HENRY
Five.

Samuel gathers the cards then picks up the bottle.

HENRY
Can I have a little?
 (beat)
Since I ain’t had any yet?

SAMUEL
You won yet?

HENRY
No.

Samuel eyes Henry as he takes a large mouthful.                 

Such is the way with young boys. Sometime all that matters to them is winning the game, and earning the right to brag… or drink the beer! But sometimes the game itself is a distraction.. From what or why isn’t directly addressed at first.

That in many ways is the beauty of Go Fish. You can feel an undercurrent of eeriness in the first few pages. It makes you feel unsettled, as you know there’s more to this picture than meets the eye.

Sure enough, the truth reveals itself with a sudden ferocity that comes and goes with the snap of a finger – or, would that be a claw?!? Suddenly you realize why the boys are bloodied and covered in muck, as they’ve been fighting off things that go bump in the night.

The brilliance of this script is in telling this story from the perspective of the boys. On the surface, they treat the horror no differently than one would cope with a pet gone rabid. They do not fear for the sake of fear itself, but as most inexperienced kids do, they just get on with things. Distract themselves with the fun of games, joshing each other, yappin’ about girls, and of course the glory of beer.

Kirsten James’ Go Fish is a truly unique and innovative story that blends the scariness of monster movies with how children cope with trauma - in a way that will leave you satisfied and really wanting to see more of this world she’s fashioned into narrative.

For filmmakers out there seeking to make a movie that oozes atmospheric potential, and also allows them to creatively explore a new and original take of a familiar genre, then look no further.

GO FISH and you’ll be pleasantly surprised by what you catch!

The Script

Go Fish

It's the 1930s, two ten year old boys spend the evening in the family hunting cabin, playing cards and drinking beer. It seems like fun until the reality of the day catches up with them.

About The Reviewer

Jeremy Storey's picture
Real name: 

Jeremy Storey, originally hails from the United Kingdom, but now resides in Seattle, WA. He first discovered the joys of writing at school, penning short stories and collaborating on comic books with his friends. Coming from a writerly family, it was clearly in his DNA to tell stories. However,...Read more

About The Writer

Kirsten James's picture
Real name: 

Kirsten is an aspiring screenwriter in her early 40’s, originally from NZ, living in the USA. She started writing short stories 4 years ago, and after a year learned that she was more geared to writing scripts. Kirsten has a degree in psychology and finds this a great asset to her writing....Read more

Pages

Subscribe to Shootin' The Shorts
sendnudes