Shootin' The Shorts

Shootin' The Shorts is run by J.E. Clarke a longtime prolific screenwriter who loves to give others a little boost in the marketplace by highlighting why she believes their short script may stand out. She brings with her a loyal band of readers who share the same compassionate attitude who have joined her cause as it's grown and grown to connect writers with filmmakers on a monthly basis. Now it finds a home here on Script Revolution.

This is all about highlighting what makes a script great by focusing on the positives. You'll find no negative criticism or lists of issues here. Submitting a short script for consideration couldn't be easier, simply scroll down to the bottom of your script edit page and tick the "Submit to Shootin' The Shorts" checkbox. Please note; it takes time to get through all submissions, everything is subjective, and we're by no means saying these are the best short scripts on Script Revolution, they are simply the ones that have found an admirer within this section - CJ

The Hearse from Beyond - Wanna Ride?

The Hearse From Beyond
On Halloween night, a young trick-or-treater is visited by a ghostly wagon driven by a sinister old man.

Do our earliest Halloween memories mold our view of it as we age?

What do you recall about your first evening of “Trick-or-Treat?” Were you thinking candy, candy, candy? Candy corn, Tootsie Rolls, jack-o-lanterns and more?   Or... were you terrified by the ghastly creatures roaming the nightt?

“The Hearse From Beyond” by Jason K. Allen delves deep into those memories and fears; and what makes Halloween an extraordinary experience for one particular man---a now long-distant night that changed his world for his whole life.

EXT. SUBURBS - NIGHT
A lit pumpkin flickers on a porch.

Three kids wearing Halloween masks excitedly approach a house. They ring the doorbell.
When the door opens, they yell: "Trick or treat!"

SUPERIMPOSE: “October 31, 1973”

After receiving their candy, they happily move on to the next house.

Nearby, eight-year-old DANIEL TAYLOR, wearing a Casper the Friendly Ghost mask, wanders across a lawn. He removes his mask, peers into his bag of candy.

MOTHER (O.S.)
(from afar) Daniel? Daniel, it’s time to come in, hon!

He glances toward a house.

DANIEL
Okay, mom!

He looks around the neighborhood. All is quiet. Most everyone has gone inside for the night.
Rummaging through his bag of goodies, he samples some candy.

In the distance, the faint CLICK-CLACK of horseshoes on pavement. Slow, methodical steps.

Daniel looks down the road, but sees nothing. He reaches back into his bag.

The click-clack sound draws closer. Daniel glances up and detects some movement -- a silhouette in the darkness. He steps toward the road to get a better look.

Emerging from the darkness is a horse pulling a wagon. Seated atop the wagon: a shadowy figure wearing a top hat. Daniel watches, curious.

The wagon comes closer, finally pausing in the road -- directly in front of Daniel.

All is deathly quiet. With wide eyes, Daniel studies the wagon and the massive black horse.
Daniel's eyes follow the horse's reins, which lead to pair of pale, slender hands.

The DRIVER -- with his long, grim face and a splash of silver hair peaking out from under his hat -- stares ahead, motionless.

The horse WHINNIES, causing Daniel to jump. Slowly the Driver turns his head in the direction of Daniel. He glares at Daniel with cold, hollow eyes.

Daniel steps backward. Finally he turns and runs for home. Glancing back, he notices the Driver still staring.

Daniel leaps up onto his porch and hurries inside.

What does the dark stranger want? And does he intend to communicate to this child?  

With its rich description and spine-chilling effects, “The Hearse From Beyond” delivers a spooky bag of treats that will satisfy any director craving a short, effective Halloween scare.

The Script

The Hearse from Beyond

On Halloween night, a young trick-or-treater is visited by a ghostly wagon driven by a sinister old man.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen screenplays and one TV pilot. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood Tales, Emporium Gazette, and Night...Read more

About The Writer

Jason K. Allen's picture
Real name: 

Jason K. Allen is a writer and filmmaker from Nashville, TN. He is also a wilderness guide, nature photographer and published author. Allen has won Best Screenplay honors at the San Diego Film Awards, Mountain of Laughs Comedy Fest, Milledgeville Film Festival, TSA Screenwriting Awards and...Read more

Meeting the Other Woman - A Scenario that Never Bodes Well!

Meeting the Other Woman
A wife discovers something important about her own life when she finally meets the other woman.

Everyone’s had that moment in a relationship. Your significant other shows up late, won’t answer their phone, and that voice in your head keeps asking could there be someone else?

For Joan Peterson, that fear turned to reality. An affair, years in the making, going on right under her nose. Then reality turned to nightmare – her husband’s jilted ex-lover standing in their driveway with a loaded gun. A bullet ripping through her husband’s chest.

Punching a hole through the façade of Joan’s perfect marriage.

Now she’s in desperate need of answers. That’s why she’s traveled all the way to maximum-security prison, face to face with her husband’s killer on Death Row.

But the answers she gets quickly make one thing clear – she’s not the only victim here. Not the only one deceived, heartbroken, lost.

What follows is a delicate (and brilliantly written) dance between two wounded souls. Both women intertwined by shared misery, forced to circle the shattered remains of their lives. Yet each kept at arm’s length by an insurmountable fissure of anger and resentment.

Can either find closure, or will confrontation only exacerbate their pain? As accusations fly and revelations mount one thing is certain… neither woman will leave unchanged.

Production: Two adult females and a few extras. Will need some interior locations that can work as a prison. Might be able to get away with just a “visitation room”.

About the writer: David Lambertson took up writing rather late in life having already been retired before he put pen to paper (okay – finger to computer key) for the first time. His favorite genres to read and write are dramedies and romantic comedies. He has written five features, including; The Last Statesman (a Nicholl’s and BlueCat quarterfinalist and a PAGE Finalist) and The Beginning of The End and The End (a Nicholl’s quarterfinalist and PAGE Awards Finalist). You can check out more of his work here.

About the reviewer: James Barron is a former law student turned screenwriter who loves to write comedy along with the occasional horror/thriller.

The Script

Meeting The Other Woman

A widow learns important details of her life when she finally meets the other woman - in prison.

About The Reviewer

James Barron's picture
Real name: 

I love to write comedy along with the occasional horror/thriller. My work is frequently showcased on Janet's Shootin' The Shorts Blog (which is now part of Script Revolution too!)

Feel free to check out more on my website:
http://...Read more

About The Writer

David Lambertson's picture
Real name: 

Hmmm - how does one craft a writing biography for one that has not spent a life writing? I'll give it a shot. I knew I wanted to be a writer when I was eighteen. I started writing when I was 56. In the years between I got married, had children, got divorced, got married again, had grandchildren...Read more

A Child Outside - and Outside Can Be Oh So Cold...

A Child Outside
Motherly love can be shown in oh so many ways… even murder.

We don’t like to hear about a young person being hurt, much less witness it. How could a parent ever intentionally harm their own child? Or… kill them? What could possibly possess a parent to perpetrate such a deed?

It’s not easy to portray the unpinning of fundamental societal assumptions, especially when they have to do with family, loyalties or a mother’s unconditional love. Yet, Chris Keaton masterfully does just that in his latest work, A Child Outside.

The main character, Anna, is convinced that mommy knows best, that death is the only option. It’s for their own good. It’s what God would want. And, Anna’s faith is unwavering.

ANNA
I’m sorry sweet baby I should’ve-

She chokes back tears.

ANNA
I should’ve paid attention to the signs…

She whispers a prayer to herself.

ANNA
Fear not, for I have redeemed you. When you pass through the waters, I will be with you. When you pass through the rivers, they will not sweep over you…

Anna appears to be crazy; her daughters so young and innocent.

Short but not at all sweet, Keaton’s very dark A Child Outside comes to a twisted and chilling end: one that will be sure to unsettle any audience’s assumptions about Satan or sanity.

The Script

A Child Outside

A mother faces a terrible decision to rid herself of demons.

About The Reviewer

Julia Cottle's picture
Real name: 

Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing.Read more

About The Writer

Chris Keaton's picture
Real name: 

Chris Keaton, like many deranged people, writes screenplays and actually believes he's pretty good at it. His delusion has brought him to write at least a dozen feature films and numerous short scripts of questionable quality. Several directors have been enabling Chris Keaton's mental illness by...Read more

Nun Too Soon - Pray You Don't Miss This One!

NUN TOO SOON
Two uncommon women meet and discover what they have in common.

Film-makers with access to a city and a taxicab (or an Uber) should check out this smart, rewarding, three-handed character piece from David Lambertson.

Kimberly and Theresa, two strangers from two very different backgrounds, share a ride from New Jersey to the same Manhattan hotel.

On the way they overcome their prejudices -- and a barrage of wisecracks from their New York cabbie -- and learn more than they ever suspected about how the other half lives and loves.

Kimberly is all expensive curves, stiletto heels and mouthwash --

KIMBERLY
I’m a hooker.

THERESA
Oh, my.

KIMBERLY
Really? You couldn't tell?

THERESA
No, I wouldn’t have guessed that --

MAX THE DRIVER
(proudly)
I got it right off.

Meanwhile Theresa, in a modest grey jacket and skirt, with no jewelry or makeup, turns out to be more worldly than she might seem.

As she says, "I'm a nun. Not a saint."

Toward the end of the story, as the two women bond and the pieces fall into place, we suddenly see the big picture. Moments later, the characters themselves have the same realization, and there's a delicious sense of anticipation as we wonder how Kimberly and Theresa are going to deal with their embarrassing discovery...

They rise to the challenge splendidly, and when at last we leave them, our two ladies are on the cusp of launching themselves into an evening that neither of them will ever forget.

And remember: female protagonists are hot right now. If you're looking for material that would make a splash with festival audiences, Nun Too Soon might be just the ticket!

The Script

Nun Too Soon

Two uncommon women meet and discover what they have in common.

About The Reviewer

Paul Barlow's picture
Real name: 

I'd like to think it's more about the writing than about me, but OK, lemme see... I'm a member of The Left Door screenwriting group and I've been writing for quite a few years now, mostly features, but also three TV pilots. Plus, inevitably, a ragbag of webisodes, shorts and skits, some of which...Read more

About The Writer

David Lambertson's picture
Real name: 

Hmmm - how does one craft a writing biography for one that has not spent a life writing? I'll give it a shot. I knew I wanted to be a writer when I was eighteen. I started writing when I was 56. In the years between I got married, had children, got divorced, got married again, had grandchildren...Read more

The Rain Man - When it Rains, It Pours....

The Rain Man
A man tells a couple of diner patrons his haunting encounter
with an urban legend known as the Rain Man.

Have you ever contemplated the truth of an Urban Legend?  Or do you laugh them off, when such Tall Tales inevitably roll around?

For most of us - like an oozing wound or dark shadow - an Urban Legend can creep into your mind. The images such stories evoke drift quietly into a lonely corner of your imagination -- until they're stirred up, like dust. It's then they become a sinister substance: something tangible that won't leave you alone.

Elizabeth H. Vu’s “The Rain Man” shows it’s not always wise to shrug off someone else’s fear.

The script introduces us to Mikayla and the "Skeptical Gentleman" while they huddle in a small restaurant, attempting to escape a sudden downpour.  As they order food and drip on tile, the two listen to the story of a third customer, who claims he just had a Close Encounter of the Urban Legend type.

Mikayla watches him while eating.

The Man glances at the Gentleman. He turns back to Mikayla, growing annoyed.

MAN
Back to what I was saying--

Mikayla looks at him.

MIKAYLA
The Rain Man, right?

MAN
Right. (then) He's an evil entity that appears in the form of a young man.
He has white skin and red eyes that glow in the dark.
But he only appears when it rains. That's why they call him the Rain Man.

The Gentleman suddenly starts laughing. The Man turns to him, offended.

MAN
What? It's true. I saw him on the way coming here.

MIKAYLA
What did he look like?

MAN
Well, like I said. White skin, red eyes. He was standing behind me.

GENTLEMAN
If he was standing behind you, how could you tell that he had white skin and red eyes?

Mikayla laughs lightly. 

MAN
I turned around. That's how I saw him.
At first, I was just standing there in the rain under my umbrella, and then I heard a voice.
"May I stand under your umbrella?" That's what he said.
When I saw his face, I took off and ran straight here.

He drinks his coffee.
The Gentleman and Mikayla look at each other.

MAN
Man, what a night.

And an unbelievable story. But, when a stranger warns you of grave danger, should you dismiss it?  Or let it convince you?

Elizabeth H. Vu’s “The Rain Man” knows. And if you’re looking for a fast-paced eerie story that stays with you after credits roll, check it out for yourself. For good or evil, you’ll know, too.

The Script

The Rain Man

A man tells a couple of diner patrons his haunting encounter with an urban legend known as the Rain Man.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen screenplays and one TV pilot. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood Tales, Emporium Gazette, and Night...Read more

About The Writer

Elizabeth H. Vu's picture
Real name: 

Although I started screenwriting in 2008, I didn’t get my scripts out there until 2016. I’ve now had 7 short scripts produced and I currently have a feature in post-production. I’m quite happy with what I have achieved so far, but I can’t help but crave for more accomplishments.

Ever...Read more

Token - Both of appreciation, and Life...

Token
One stop on a train changes everything.

Petty squabbles tend to bring out the worst in people. Provoking regrettable words. Causing hurt feelings that fester -  about things that normally wouldn’t matter at all. At such times, being right suddenly seems more important than anything else.  But when enough time passes, the details of the argument can rarely be even recalled.

Everyone knows there are no guarantees in life,  so why do most people assume there will always be time to make amends?

In Rick Hansberry's Token, Chad - a young man riding the subway - witnesses an older couple squabbling over being courteous.

INT. SUBWAY CAR - DAY

MARY and BRUCE, both 50, grumble at each other as they struggle to get comfortable in their seats. There’s plenty of open seats but these two dig in to battle for position.

BRUCE
So typical of you, you’d rather fight me than do the right thing.

MARY
That’s right. Because clearly you’re not capable of being a gentleman or doing the right thing.

Chad suppresses a smile, twirls his finger around the balloon string. The balloon still dances above him, out of sight.

But with the click of a button, Chad experiences an unexpected realization of how fleeting and precious our time truly is.  A lesson that the bickering couple may have forgotten momentarily. But Chad leaves behind a gift that (hopefully) will cause them to recollect.  

Token” is proof the most haunting shorts are those that address poignant and universal facts of life - factors that Rick Hansberry masterfully condenses into a single one-punch page.  The kind of emotional brevity that festivals always love...

The Script

Token

One stop on a train changes everything.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen screenplays and one TV pilot. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood Tales, Emporium Gazette, and Night...Read more

About The Writer

Rick Hansberry's picture
Real name: 

Rick Hansberry is an award-winning screenwriter with more than 20 years of industry experience. With several produced credits on his IMDb page, Rick has written, produced and directed several short films. 2017 will see the debut of two feature-length films and two more short films. Rick has...Read more

Homecoming - Coming Home is Sometimes More Than Bittersweet...

HOMECOMING
A woman must travel through a strange and dangerous land to get to her final resting place.

Homecoming greets us with a post-apocalyptic landscape of decaying forests and crumbling apartment buildings; of weed-cracked streets and fairground rides rusted in place.  Towering over it all, at the heart of this forgotten city stands a giant concrete tomb.  Yet this is no imagined future, this is our recent past.  A moment in history with a legacy set to haunt us for generations to come.

Welcome to Chernobyl.  

Into this irradiated wasteland comes Eva, an aging exile braving the dead of winter and resurgent wolves in a bid to reach a place she once called home.  

Time is running out for Eva.  She wants nothing more from this world than to take her place among the ruins of her past.  But she soon discovers this shattered land holds more than just memories.  Something survived in the shadow of reactor no.4; and with it answers to the questions that have tortured Eva’s conscience since that tragic spring day long ago.

Can Eva at last find her release?

Dave Lambertson’s Homecoming introduces us to a haunting, post-apocalyptic no-mans-land before reminding us that such a world exists.  Yet beneath its gritty exterior lies a story of hope; of one woman’s quest to find peace setting another on a journey of discovery.  It’s not for a beginner filmmaker, but with access to the right location and a creative vision it certainly isn’t out of reach.

The Script

Homecoming

A woman must travel through a strange and dangerous land to get to her final resting place.

About The Reviewer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 

Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount...Read more

About The Writer

David Lambertson's picture
Real name: 

Hmmm - how does one craft a writing biography for one that has not spent a life writing? I'll give it a shot. I knew I wanted to be a writer when I was eighteen. I started writing when I was 56. In the years between I got married, had children, got divorced, got married again, had grandchildren...Read more

Girl in the Fence - Look Hard Enough, and You'll See....

The Girl in the Fence
An anomaly in an online photo opens a divide between a childless couple which may be resolved if only they can understand what the photo is trying to reveal.

Have you ever looked at a pile of scattered puzzle pieces of a landscape scene and thought, “Oh, how beautiful.” Probably not.  But, as you twist and turn the shapes and begin to interlock the pieces, something that was merely cardboard cutouts soon forms an image of beauty that resonates with you.

And have you searched through that same pile, looking for one piece in particular to fill in the gap, just for the satisfaction of making it complete?

And then if you try hard enough once more: can you even picture yourself there, in that scene enjoying the beauty of it all?

In Anthony Cawood’s “The Girl in the Fence,”  Jodie believes she has found something that will fill the gap in her life. But her husband Grady doesn’t quite see things the way she does.

JODIE
Hey, take a look at this.

GRADY, 50s, balding and bespectacled enters the room carrying a bowl of soup.

GRADY
Can I eat first?

He holds up the bowl.

JODIE
No, this first... it's... beautiful.

He raises an eyebrow, but sees she's excited, so acquiesces. He puts the bowl down and joins her on the couch.

GRADY
So?

Jodie turns the laptop round a bit so he can see better.
INSERT: Laptop screen Street view, large garden fence, a few cars.
Jodie toggles the view round a little, a gate, more cars.

JODIE
See?

GRADY
Yes, our street, our fence, fame at last.

JODIE
No, not that, this.

INSERT: Laptop screen She zooms in on the screen, their garden fence looms large.

JODIE
Now?

GRADY
No... wait…

A finger points at a knot in the wood of the fence.

JODIE
It's a --

GRADY
(sarcastic)
A knot in the wood that looks a bit like a face.

She pushes his hand off the keyboard and zooms in some more. The face projects from the wall.

JODIE
It's a girl.

GRADY
If you say so.

JODIE
I do. Wonder how it got there?

GRADY
Well, the fence has been there forever.

He smiles, amused with his own joke.

JODIE
Let's go check.

GRADY
Now?

He points to the window, it’s pitch black outside. Jodie is already up and heading out of the room.

GRADY
Apparently so.

However, in order to appreciate the beauty of life’s enchantments, one’s desires must far exceed one’s need for proof of the extraordinary. And in this case, Jodie’s desires lead her on a magical path to discovery.

“The Girl in the Fence” gently weaves the sadness of an irreplaceable loss with the magical wonders of following your heart.

But, be warned, this isn’t a script that you can take at face value, because maybe, just maybe this is the remarkable journey you’ve been waiting to discover for yourself.

The Script

The Girl in the Fence

An anomaly in an online photo opens a divide between a childless couple which may be resolved if only they can understand what the photo is trying to reveal.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen screenplays and one TV pilot. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood Tales, Emporium Gazette, and Night...Read more

About The Writer

Anthony Cawood's picture
Real name: 

Award-winning screenwriter with one feature in post-production, two further features optioned and currently working on a thriller which will shoot in late 2017 in Nigeria. In addition to features, he has over forty short scripts produced/sold/optioned - including eight filmed.
Also pens...Read more

Empty Spaces - And the Voids They Fill....

Empty Spaces
Two sisters struggle with the loss of their father and wonder if and how they can move on.

 

Do we, as children, truly know our parents? And do we, as parents, let our children truly know us?

When growing up in a family environment, the order of birth, gender, and personality traits all play significant roles in how each individual child perceives their parents. And when one parent finds solace in a bottle, unveiling that reason is sometimes left to those who pay more attention to who their parents really are as opposed to who they want them to be.

Then, more often than not, when the oldest moves out of the unhappy home, the siblings who are left behind feel resentful as if they’ve been abandoned and are no longer loved. But, in reality, nothing could be farther from the truth.

This rings true between the sisters, Debbie and Aiden, in Jessica Waters’ “Empty Spaces.” And the dialogue in this script rings sharp, indeed:

DEBBIE
You’ve been eating nothing but nicotine for the past two days. Mom’s worried.

AIDEN
And you?

DEBBIE
I was worried too until I spent an hour being chastised by mom. Now I’m thinking of picking up the old habit again.

AIDEN
That’s what habits are for.

Aiden digs around in her pocket and pulls out a cigarette a moment later. She holds it out to Debbie who reluctantly takes it. Aiden pulls out a lighter and does the honors for her sister.

DEBBIE
You’re not a pod person, right? I mean you’re still...you?

AIDEN
What the hell does that mean?

DEBBIE
I just don’t wanna lose you.

Debbie takes a long drag of the cigarette. A moment later she’s doubled over coughing, Aiden pats her back playfully until Debbie regains her composure.

AIDEN
You know I don’t know how to act. I can’t sit at the kitchen table drowning in bullshit memories that mom’s created for him. I can’t.

DEBBIE
So love him how he was.

AIDEN
You can’t love someone who spent the past five years consumed by the thought that he’d rather live for booze than live for us.
(she snubs out her cigarette)
Well for me at least. You’ve been God knows where.

DEBBIE
I’ve been working. Don’t act like I abandoned you.

Aiden clenches her jaw tight. Debbie reaches out to her but Aiden brushes her hand away.

In “Empty Spaces,” Debbie figures out early on why her father appeared to have chosen alcohol over his family.

And later, shown symbolically through a box of their father’s photos, Aiden, too comes to terms with the reason for his personal torment.

In this one location, small cast drama, Jessica Waters’ “Empty Spaces” exposes the deeper wounds of a family dealing with alcoholism and the secrets it harbors. Forget about "looking in a bottle".... if you desire a solid, intelligent drama to wow festival audiences, a director need go no further than this.

The Script

Empty Spaces

Two sisters struggle with the loss of their father and wonder if and how they can move on.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen screenplays and one TV pilot. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood Tales, Emporium Gazette, and Night...Read more

About The Writer

Jessica Waters's picture
Real name: 

I write stories that matter, so that the world can begin to understand the necessity for valuable representation of marginalized communities. I am a queer black woman, and that is essential to how I approach my writing; whether it be through characters, settings, or experiences. All my short...Read more

Thyme - Time Changes...Everything.

Where the Wild Thyme Grows
A curious young boy stirs the ire of a local witch when he stumbles upon a long buried treasure.

Throughout the ages, witches have been portrayed as vindictive old crones, putting hexes on victims for their own wicked gains.

In Steve Miles’ classic screenplay, “Where the Wild Thyme Grows” - Witch Marie may be old. And she does indeed cast a spell.

But Marie isn’t vindictive... and her hex may ultimately not be bad.

The subject of her spell is Caleb, a boy who uncovers buried treasure. A "scrap of idle mischief", Caleb is but 12 years old, and too innocent (in certain ways) to know the rhyme "finders keepers, losers weepers” can hold much more sentiment (and conflict) than the child-like song implies.

EXT. VILLAGE PARK - PLAYGROUND - DAY

Caleb sits on a swing. He tears the wrapper from a stick of gum, tosses it away. The wrapper tumbles with the wind --

The tip of a walking stick pins it to the ground. Caleb thumbs his mobile phone.

MARIE
Did you lose something, child?

Caleb startles. He turns to find Marie close behind him. She holds out the wrapper.

CALEB
No.

MARIE
Are you sure?

CALEB
Yeah.

MARIE
Then perhaps you found something?

She moves around in front of him.

MARIE
A small shiny thing. The kind of small shiny thing that doesn’t belong in the claws of a young magpie.

She stops, holds his eyes intently.

MARIE
Sometimes we’ve good reason to bury the past. It brings great comfort to those that don’t know they’re no longer with us.

CALEB
I ain’t found nothin’.

MARIE
You’re sure? Only I fear I may not be the last to come looking.

He draws back on the seat, as if to swing forward.

CALEB
You’re in my way.

Marie straightens.

CALEB
You gonna hit me?

MARIE
Where would the sense be in such a thing?

Caleb pulls his feet up -- Marie just manages to step aside in time.

CALEB
Then piss off, you old witch.

She sighs. Watches him swing back and forth --

A bad start to a relationship, no doubt. But - when a spell is cast for the right reasons, is there any harm in adding a dash of terror to the brew?

The visual imagery of “Where the Wild Thyme Grows” is laced with terror... and poetic beauty as well: everything from the hillside setting to an eerie abandoned cottage, where deep secrets of Marie's heart lie. Produce this script, and your audience will visit them, too.  Make no mistake: magic lurks inside these pages. Consider Wild Thyme for your next project, and let the setting and story cast its spell.
 

The Script

Where The Wild Thyme Grows

A curious young boy stirs the ire of a local witch when he stumbles upon a long buried treasure.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen screenplays and one TV pilot. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood Tales, Emporium Gazette, and Night...Read more

About The Writer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 

Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount...Read more

Pages

Subscribe to Shootin' The Shorts
sendnudes