The Revelator - think elevators are scary places? Until you read this – you have no idea | Script Revolution

The Revelator - think elevators are scary places? Until you read this – you have no idea

Many people believe that death brings a day of judgment. The Good go on to Heaven and the Bad go to Hell. Others don’t believe, and for them death is merely an end. Yet others come to find God in their final moments, fervently hoping that something awaits them in a Great Beyond.

And, sometimes, God finds them. Wall Street poster boy Mason, the protagonist of David Lambertson’s The Revelator, is on an elevator when he feels a sharp pain and collapses on the floor.

Enter Mason’s Maker.

Needless to say—given his chosen profession—Mason has not led a life of brotherly love and solidarity with his fellow human beings. And, not a believer, he becomes quickly enraged with the creator’s timely arrival:

MASON
Please, call an ambulance.

SPEAKER (V.O.)
There is no need. You are not sick.

MASON
Just fucking do it!
(yells)
I’ll sue your ass. Call the
paramedics now.

But, Speaker has other plans for Mason. On the verge of death, some have described how life flashes before their eyes. Mason’s doesn’t flash. Rather, Speaker initiates a torturous game of floor-hopping visits through the man’s past misdeeds. Mason vows to change. But, Speaker demands something more than mere promises.

Mason quickly realizes that Speaker means business; not exactly the type of higher power that Mason had imagined, nor the type that others so frequently describe. But, if Mason knows anything, it’s how to take advantage of others when making a deal. So, even in the face of death, his greed endures.

Will Speaker be forgiving and let this Wall Street scum survive? Or, will Mason be left on floor 39 to die? You won’t want to miss the chance to find out. Revelator provides a twisted opportunity to explore the limits of heavenly intervention. You think elevators are scary places? Until you read this – you have no idea.

Pages: 10

Budget: Moderate. Need for an appropriate elevator and medical team costumes

About The Reviewer

Julia Cottle's picture
Real name: 

Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing.Read more

About The Writer

David Lambertson's picture
Real name: 

Hmmm - how does one craft a writing biography for one that has not spent a life writing? I'll give it a shot. I knew I wanted to be a writer when I was eighteen. I started writing when I was 56. In the years between I got married, had children, got divorced, got married again, had grandchildren...Read more