Shootin' The Shorts | Page 11 | Script Revolution

Shootin' The Shorts

Shootin' The Shorts is run by J.E. Clarke a longtime prolific screenwriter who loves to give others a little boost in the marketplace by highlighting why she believes their short script may stand out. She brings with her a loyal band of readers who share the same compassionate attitude who have joined her cause as it's grown and grown to connect writers with filmmakers on a monthly basis. Now it finds a home here on Script Revolution.

This is all about highlighting what makes a script great by focusing on the positives. You'll find no negative criticism or lists of issues here. Submitting a short script for consideration couldn't be easier, simply scroll down to the bottom of your script edit page and tick the "Submit to Shootin' The Shorts" checkbox. Please note; it takes time to get through all submissions, everything is subjective, and we're by no means saying these are the best short scripts on Script Revolution, they are simply the ones that have found an admirer within this section - CJ

Xolotl's Curse - Pray You Don't Need To....

Xolotl's Curse
Some lessons are learned the hard way…

Ah. Lessons taught by the horror genre. No matter how often they splatter across the silver screen, so rarely are they taken to heart. Don’t go on that isolated camping trip with your friends. Don’t answer that phone call while babysitting. Don’t open the creaky closet door. Leave that creepy-ass looking doll alone.

And don’t play with artifacts hidden under your grandpa’s bed. Well, we guess some folks will never learn…

Case in point: Xolotl’s Curse.

Billy's Grandpa is a foul-mouthed, misogynistic bully who constantly berates Billy's mom and emasculates his dad. In other words, he’s your usual relative. Now he's moving in. And he has secrets.

See, Grandpa's an old archaeologist - pushing 100, although he doesn't look a day over 75. He's keeping an ancient Aztec box locked up in his room that may belong to Xolotl, god of the dead and bad luck. Billy tries again and again to get his hands on the box. But Grandpa is always one step ahead of him. But some secrets are better left buried…

Chris Keaton - an old hand at clever macabre stories - sets this tale of terror in the day-to-day life of suburbia, with a keen ear for the trash-talking dialogue between a 12-year old and an old man who may as well be squabbling kid brothers. Despite the topic, this script’s got a slow, subtle (and often funny) burn – building to a chilling conclusion.

What happens next? Well, we’re keeping this review short and sweet. No spoilers for you lazy folks out there. Crack this one open far before Halloween arrives, and savor its bloody twist for yourself.

Xolotl’s Curse. A perfect script for either a seasoned horror director or any up-and-coming filmmaker who wants to dabble in the genre.

About the reviewer: Pete Barry is an award-winning screenwriter, playwright, actor, director and musician. His short plays have been published in numerous collections. He’s also a cofounder of the Porch Room, a film and theater production company, website available at http://www.porchroom.com/.  Please feel free to reach out to him with script requests at petebarry27 “AT” Hotmail.

The Script

Xolotl's Curse

A boy learns the hard way to stay out of other people's stuff.

About The Reviewer

J.E. Clarke's picture
Real name: 

Known for her unique characters and plots, J.E. Clarke has optioned her feature length horror, "Containment" with Primestar Film Group (director Mike Elliott of Scorpion King 4 attached), her SF feature "Stream" with Purryburry Productions, John Noble of "Fringe...Read more

About The Writer

Chris Keaton's picture
Real name: 

Chris Keaton, like many deranged people, writes screenplays and actually believes he's pretty good at it. His delusion has brought him to write at least a dozen feature films and numerous short scripts of questionable quality. Several directors have been enabling Chris Keaton's mental illness by...Read more

Hannah's Demons - Evil Never Rests

Hannah's Demons
Hannah learns that running from her demons only makes things worse…

You can't run away from your problems. This is something that Hannah learns quite literally in Hannah's Demons, a disturbing thriller by talented screenwriter Warren Duncan.

Hannah is, by all definitions, a final girl in the vein of Jennifer Love Hewitt in I Know What You Did Last Summer or Sigourney Weaver in Alien. The difference is, we don't know what horror Hannah has escaped from. We meet her alone in the woods in the middle of the night, torn clothes, ragged breathing and scared to death. Someone very persistent is chasing her and she can't escape, no matter how fast or how far she runs.

That's when she sees a cabin. Maybe someone is home. Maybe they will help her! Hannah pounds on the door and... nothing. With no other option, Hannah smashes a window and dives inside.

She takes quick inventory of her surroundings and arms herself with a kitchen knife. As her attacker enters the house, Hannah takes cover under the kitchen table. Hoping, praying, that her stalker doesn't find her. Is she safe?

Nope.

Her pursuer begins searching the house, leaving no stone left unturned. He calls her name, "Hannah, you need to come home..."

She shakily holds the kitchen knife, waiting for the inevitable and...

What, did you think I was going to spoil it? Go read the script! Just know that not everything is what it seems in this story and that the script ends with a mind-bending twist guaranteed to keep you up at night.

About the reviewer: Mitch Smith is an award winning screenwriter whose website (http://mitchsmithscripts.wix.com/scripts offers notes, script editing and phone consultations. You can also reach him at Mitch.SmithScripts@gmail.com and follow Mitch at https://twitter.com/MitchScripts.

The Script

Hannah's Demons

Hannah learns that running from her demons only makes things worse.

About The Reviewer

J.E. Clarke's picture
Real name: 

Known for her unique characters and plots, J.E. Clarke has optioned her feature length horror, "Containment" with Primestar Film Group (director Mike Elliott of Scorpion King 4 attached), her SF feature "Stream" with Purryburry Productions, John Noble of "Fringe...Read more

About The Writer

Warren Duncan's picture
Real name: 

I am an aspiring screenwriter from Australia. I have had multiple shorts produced and currently have several on option. I typically enjoy writing horror, thriller, and drama scripts. Please feel free to contact me at Warren_Duncan@hotmail.com or...Read more

Ruby and the Lamp - Never Rub a Genie the Wrong Way

Ruby and the Lamp
A cleaning lady discovers a suitcase filled with diamonds and a genie lamp; s
he gets three wishes but isn’t careful what she wishes for.

Every see the Twilight Zone? Not the TV series remake, or the Spielberg flick – the original series, hosted by Rod Serling in good ‘ole Black and White.

If not … you owe it to yourself to do a binge marathon. Even those who are already fans might get a kick at watching the series all over again. It’s surprising how much holds up after all these years.

One of the main reasons is that Twilight Zone relied on classic storytelling. Some of the tales were pretty straightforward. But they worked; and usually featured some kind of ironic twist at the end.

Ruby and the Lamp harkens back to that kind of pedigree; following the simple tale of Ruby – a cleaning lady that finds a magical lamp in a hotel room.

She rubs it, and the Genie appears… resulting in the standard offer of three wishes. There’s a touch of modern humor in this one, giving the story a fresh feel. What will Ruby wish for – and how horrifically will it go wrong?

Open the script to find out. But make sure it doesn’t cost your soul…

The Script

Ruby and The Lamp

A cleaning lady discovers a suitcase filled with diamonds and a genie lamp; she gets three wishes but isn't careful what she wishes for..

About The Reviewer

J.E. Clarke's picture
Real name: 

Known for her unique characters and plots, J.E. Clarke has optioned her feature length horror, "Containment" with Primestar Film Group (director Mike Elliott of Scorpion King 4 attached), her SF feature "Stream" with Purryburry Productions, John Noble of "Fringe...Read more

About The Writer

Darren Seeley's picture
Real name: 

I have written several full length and short spec screenplays, which have gone through peer reviews at Zoetrope  Talentville and Simply Scripts. 

Attended the Austin Film Festival and Heart Of Screenwriter's conference in 2001 and 2002. 

I occasionally volunteer to help out the...Read more

A Child Outside (And It's Always Cold...)

Warning: Strong and Disturbing Content

A Child Outside
Motherly love can be shown in oh so many ways… even murder.

We don’t like to hear about a young person being hurt, much less witness it. How could a parent ever intentionally harm their own child? Or… kill them? What could possibly possess a parent to perpetrate such a deed?

It’s not easy to portray the unpinning of fundamental societal assumptions, especially when they have to do with family, loyalties or a mother’s unconditional love. Yet, Chris Keaton masterfully does just that in his latest work, A Child Outside.

The main character, Anna, is convinced that mommy knows best, that death is the only option. It’s for their own good. It’s what God would want. And, Anna’s faith is unwavering.

ANNA
I’m sorry sweet baby I should’ve-

She chokes back tears.

ANNA
I should’ve paid attention to the signs…

She whispers a prayer to herself.

ANNA
Fear not, for I have redeemed you.
When you pass through the waters, I will be with you.
When you pass through the rivers, they will not sweep over you…

Anna appears to be crazy; her daughters so young and innocent.

Short but not at all sweet, Keaton’s very dark A Child Outside comes to a twisted and chilling end: one that will be sure to unsettle any audience’s assumptions about Satan or sanity.

The Script

A Child Outside

A mother faces a terrible decision to rid herself of demons.

About The Reviewer

Julia Cottle's picture
Real name: 

Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing.Read more

About The Writer

Chris Keaton's picture
Real name: 

Chris Keaton, like many deranged people, writes screenplays and actually believes he's pretty good at it. His delusion has brought him to write at least a dozen feature films and numerous short scripts of questionable quality. Several directors have been enabling Chris Keaton's mental illness by...Read more

The Other White Meat (It's Not What You Think)

The Other White Meat
When their food supply fails to arrive, space researchers Sarah and Jack face the ultimate fear…

SARAH
You wanna shuffle?

JACK
(snaps)
Give me the cards.

We’ve all experienced it. A task that no-one wants to do must be done.

So a contest to randomly select the unlucky loser is reluctantly agreed upon.

In John Hunter’s The Other White Meat, Jack and Sarah are two researchers who’ve spent 18 months searching for extra-terrestrial life on a remote ice-planet… with absolutely no success.

When the story starts, they’re already in a jam. The food’s run out, and supply line issues ensure there’s no more arriving for several weeks. So there’s only one course of action left.

But neither of them wants to decide.

A method of arbitration is therefore required; for the two starving scientists, it’s a one card draw. The stakes are higher than any card game ever played on Earth, and the rules are staggeringly simple: highest card wins, or so it seems. Though with hindsight, it appears the loser may end up being the “winner”. That is, when all is said and done…

White Meat is a script that never backs itself into one genre – sci-fi, horror, and even some dark comedy are mixed to create a concoction that invokes every emotion there is. One page you’re laughing. The next, paralyzed with fear. And it all comes across seamlessly, resulting in a roller coaster ride that handcuffs the reader – never letting them go until the very end.

With more twists than the current race for the White House, dialogue in this script shines: ranging from bitterly ironic to traumatically blunt. In fact, there’s just one box left to tick off to make this a festival winner: a director who can leverage all of White Meat’s twists – and let this infinitely rewarding script hit new heights!

About The Reviewer

Hamish Porter's picture
Real name: 

That guy who does a load of STS reviews and writes when he's not working or reading superfluous interesting articles. My filmmakers Rushmore is Nolan, Kubrick, Hitchcock, and Eastwood. Psychological thrillers, crime, and dramas are my thing, but I'm impartial to anything that's...Read more

About The Writer

John Hunter's picture
Real name: 

Sent away to school at an early age to get a fancy education, my family proudly referred to me as bilingual for an ability to speak both Standard American English and my native Cracker.

After graduation from college, a curious nature has led me down many paths in life: Former Peace Corps...Read more

Daddy - Does Father Ever Know Best?

Daddy
An assassin’s last act is to prove to his daughter and his wife that he is not a bad man.

A RED DOT...

Dances upon a MAN’S forehead until:

THUMP.

The man’s head rips backwards.

        ANNIE (V.O.)
I’m sorry that when you woke up, we
were gone. You must have been so scared.

From out of the darkness rushes, TYLER.

This is where we meet Tyler, a hard bitten killer on the opening gambit of his latest job.  

We follow Tyler as he dispenses judgment with a grace and skill honed by the years; working his way to the top of the dirtbag food chain, goon by goon.  

It isn’t about the money - not this time.  That was the old Tyler; this is a killer searching for change.  The odds are against him, but Tyler finds strength in the words of his young daughter, Annie.  Her innocence guiding him to a reward far greater than he’s ever known: redemption.

Marty Chartrand’s Daddy shines light into the dark soul of a hired gun struggling to make his peace through one last selfless act.

It’s not for a first-timer, but for a filmmaker looking to push their limits, this 7 page thrill ride gives you the opportunity to craft a fast-paced action piece underpinned by the most emotive of bonds: a father’s love for his daughter.  

So "take out" this script as your next "job"... but make darned sure you hit this target... right!

The Script

Daddy

An assassin’s last act is to prove to his daughter and his wife that he is not a bad man.

About The Reviewer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 

Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount...Read more

About The Writer

Marty Chartrand's picture
Real name: 

My life began with a FADE IN and it will surely end with a FADE OUT. What's written in between is what I make out of it. 

As a lifelong lover of movies, it was only natural that someday I would want to create some of my own. 

These are my stories ...Read more

The Apartment - New Beginnings are Always Good... Right?

The Apartment
A technology obsessed couple show up to their sublet in a new city, but soon notice something about the apartment is terribly wrong.

Have you ever had a power outage and the first thing that came to mind was how much battery life you had left on your phone, your tablet, or your computer?

Did you worry that others would grow concerned if they don't hear from you via social media - in a specific amount of time?

And have you ever been oblivious to your surroundings because technology had claimed all the attention you have to spare?

Then according to Brandi Self’s “The Apartment,” you may just be hooked into a future that is going... nowhere.

So it is for Shirley and Paul Watanabe. After the happy couple rent an apartment online, they quickly discover they have no idea what they’ve gotten themselves into. Or any concept of how to get... out.

INT. BUILDING - LOBBY - CONTINUOUS
They look around the lobby; ancient Hollywood preserved.

SHIRLEY
I feel like we’ve stepped back in time.

PAUL
Smells like moth balls. Let’s just find this “red rock”, so I can plug in.

SHIRLEY
Maybe it’s code for something. Googling.

She types on her phone.

SHIRLEY
The page won’t load.

PAUL
Look, there it is!

Paul bends down at a potted plant. Picks up a red rock. A key drops from underneath it. Shirley grabs it. Puts it in a nearby door. Turns the lock.

SHIRLEY
It fits!

INT. APARTMENT - CONTINUOUS
Paul and Shirley look around the strangely put together studio equipped with a small kitchenette. Dull, brown wall paper is in stark contrast against the colorful decor of the furniture and accessories.

PAUL
There aren’t any windows.

SHIRLEY
You’re right, how strange.  

PAUL
And it’s freezing in here.

SHIRLEY
Let me turn the heat on.

She turns to find a whiteboard with “Tonya Spurious 323 - 543 - 0000. Call me if you need anything” written across it.

SHIRLEY
There’s her phone number. Why couldn’t she just e-mail it to me?

She finds the thermostat. Switches the dial. The whole thing falls off.

SHIRLEY
It’s not even attached!

PAUL
(distracted)
Got any food?

SHIRLEY
Yeah...
(stares at the thermostat in her hands)
I brought some noodles, I’ll heat them up.

PAUL
I’ll see what’s on TV. She better have Netflix or Hulu.

Paul plops down in a chair in front of the TV as Shirley faces the kitchenette. Condiments sit on the counter, label out. Every one is emblazed with the word “Hooked” across the front.

SHIRLEY
“Hooked.”

PAUL
What?

SHIRLEY
I guess it’s a company or something. They all have the same logo.

But, is it a company - really? Or something far more insideous than that?

With its snappy dialogue and quirky twists and turns, “The Apartment” by Brandi Self poses a profound and highly current (and viral) question:  

Do we control our technology...or does our technology control us?  

Either way, controlling the direction of your next project's essential. And with "The Apartment", there's just one direction. Up!

The Script

The Apartment

A technology obsessed couple show up to their sublet in a new city, but soon notice that something about the apartment is terribly off-putting.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen short screenplays, three feature screenplays and two TV pilots. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood...Read more

About The Writer

Brandi Self's picture
Real name: 

I create surreal, carefully constructed stories that dissect love, morality, oppression, identity crises, alienation, and stagnation by catapulting characters into absurd, almost comically juxtaposed worlds where they must use self-examination as a tool for escape and redemption. 

...Read more

The Wreckage - Can Our Man Emerge from It Alive?

The Wreckage
A man grabs the chance to flee custody. 
But, being arrested is beginning to look pretty sweet in comparison to what awaits him.

It’s not often that being in a car wreck represents a stroke of luck.  But, that’s the case for the protagonist of Omid Abrams latest piece, The Wreckage. 

Detained and in handcuffs in the back of a car, Our Man wakes up to find he is the only one in the car still breathing.   His captors dead, Our Man laughs, but the pain from his multiple—graphically presented—injuries makes him gag.

Navigating his freedom from his captivity is no easy task. Handcuffed to a dead man who has been impaled by a large tree limb makes maneuvering slightly difficult.  Our Man goes for his companion’s gun to blast himself free.  He musters up his courage and…click.  The cylinder is empty. 

Now Our Man must figure out how to free the dead man from the limb, drag himself and this dead weight to the other body belonging to the driver lying outside the car, and hope that he too has a pistol on him somewhere and try again.  The agony of his every movement is painstakingly splashed across the screen.

Our Man PULLS Bald Man out of the car.

Now both men are on the floor. Our Man crawls over to Driver’s dead body, taking Bald Man with him.

Once he reaches Driver, he goes into his left pocket. A cell phone. He reaches over to Driver’s right pocket and pulls out a pistol.

Finally rid of the handcuffs, Our Man once again lets out a laugh.  But the sound of footsteps cuts his celebration short. 

He drags himself into the bushes and watches as a hunter approaches the dead bodies.   What he sees is horrifying, and Our Man quickly realizes that he’s still very much not out of the woods.

If you love great survival stories, powerfully descriptive visuals that relate better than any dialogue could ever achieve, and tales with twists, The Wreckage is the smashup for you. 

About The Reviewer

Julia Cottle's picture
Real name: 

Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing.Read more

Grandma's Hands - What Treasure or Curse Do They Hold?

Grandma's Hands
Upon the death of her estranged grandmother, a downtrodden young woman inherits a pair of gloves
which preternaturally compel her to strike back at the oppressive men in her life.

Even when grandmothers are estranged, they leave us legacies--- whether we want them or not.

But sometimes those legacies are undiscovered gifts. Much more than recipes. Costume jewelry. Or Hawaiian floral mumus.

These undiscovered gifts are the knowing that comes with having the same blood. The same dreams. And...having the same fears.

In Chris Courtney Martin’s “Grandma’s Hands,”  Billie discovers those gifts in a most unusual and tragically touching way.

INT. BLOCK HOUSE - BEDROOM - CONTINUOUS

A queen-size bed, well made with floral covers. It's littered with stacks of things--

Shoe boxes. Hat boxes. Jewelry boxes. Papers.

DODIE BLOCK, 55, stands at the foot of the bed. Flips through a binder-clipped file.

Billie sweeps in, plops on the bed. A tower of shoe boxes threatens to topple. Dodie catches them.

DODIE
Girl!

BILLIE
Does it really have to be us doing this? The woman had a tribe of children.

DODIE
Be respectful.

BILLIE
I could have said "litter."

Dodie gives her a look.

DODIE
That's my mother.

Billie sighs.

BILLIE
I know. Sorry, Mom. I'm just saying-- if she left us something, I could see - 

DODIE
She ain't leave nobody nothing, period.
You know how them backwoods folks are about lawyers and papers.

Dodie sighs.

DODIE
Here--

Dodie sets down the papers, hands Billie a wooden jewelry box.

DODIE 
For your troubles.

BILLIE
You don't have to say it like that.

Billie flips the lid, frowns.

BILLIE 
Costume.

DODIE
There's more in the closet.

Billie hops up, throws open the closet door--

Mumus. Hawaiian floral button-ups. She pulls a face. Not a chance in hell. Something catches her eye. Hanging from the pocket of an ancient overcoat: the leather gloves.

Billie grabs the gloves, slips one on. Her sweater sleeve shifts up. Reveal: a nasty purple bruise around her wrist.

She slips on the other glove. Wiggles her fingers. Perfect fit. Billie admires them. Dodie glances over her shoulder.

DODIE 
Almost one o'clock.

Billie snaps-to.

BILLIE
Dang it. Alright. Thanks.

Billie grabs her puffy coat off the back of a chair.

BILLIE 
Be back after my shift.

She kisses Dodie on the cheek, rushes out.

But, her grandmother’s leather gloves are more fitting than Billie could have ever imagined.

Is it true that we leave our imprint on what we’ve left behind? Can we better sympathize with someone if we’ve walked in their shoes--or in this case--worn their gloves?

“Grandma’s Hands” is an edgy, fast-paced take on how one young woman learns to get a grip on her own life through the eyes of her grandmother’s. A perfect combination of universal truth and high concept premise, don't let this short slip through your fingers and get away!

The Script

Grandma's Hands

Upon the death of her estranged grandmother, a downtrodden young woman inherits a pair of gloves which preternaturally compel her to strike back at the oppressive men in her life.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen short screenplays, three feature screenplays and two TV pilots. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood...Read more

About The Writer

Chris Courtney Martin's picture

I'm a writer. I'm a producer. I'm a thinker, dreamer, rebel. But most of all? I'm happy that the word-count minimum for these bios has been reduced. I would like to hope the work speaks for itself. I've been doing this for a long time and I've come to realize that at the end of the day, personal...Read more

Thirst - Sometimes Urges Can't Be Quenched....

Thirst
A man struggling with a food addiction must make a major change... if he wants to survive.    

Overcoming addiction proves difficult when the underlying reason for seeking constant pleasure goes untreated - and unseen.

Alcohol, cigarettes, prescription drugs and food often merely substitute for what might truly be missing from a person’s life - for instance: love, self-esteem, a meaningful job. In such cases, cravings often prevail - even when the consequences are dire. Or worse.

Scott, the protagonist of Chris Keaton’s Thirst, is a junk-food junkie.  Despite his doctor’s warnings, and loving wife Helen’s efforts to prepare healthy meals, Scott’s binging seems endless.  And Helen’s efforts only exacerbate the guilt Scott brings home with each relapse.

And with this latest incident, there’s no hiding Scott's culinary "sin".  The burrito he just scarfed down at a taco truck on the way home has given Scott an insatiable thirst:   

Scott pours the milk into a glass and drinks.

He pours and drinks another glass. And then another. And then another. Helen watches him with concern.

Scott roots around the fridge.

SCOTT
That’s not it. Something will hit the spot.

HELEN
You did eat junk food! Your diet won’t work if you cheat. Salty foods are bad for your blood pressure.

Scott ignores her and drinks anything - and everything - in the fridge. He chugs an energy drink. Then a fruit juice.

Slopping a mess on the floor the entire time.

Helen grows increasingly nervous as she observes her husband.  She stops chopping vegetables - then screams when she notices she’s cut herself.  Scott hurries over to his wife and sucks greedily at the blood streaming from her injured finger.  His thirst grows

Will Scott be able to satiate these sudden, inexplicable cravings?  Will this be the incident that ultimately helps Scott end his addictions for good?  Even more importantly: given such a stomach churning turn of events... can Scott's marriage survive?

Keaton's twisted tale of Thirst serves up a surprising feast for directors to bite into  - one that audiences will surely devour as well!

The Script

THIRST

An overweight man cheating on his diet gains an unnatural thirst that only blood will quench.

About The Reviewer

Julia Cottle's picture
Real name: 

Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing.Read more

About The Writer

Chris Keaton's picture
Real name: 

Chris Keaton, like many deranged people, writes screenplays and actually believes he's pretty good at it. His delusion has brought him to write at least a dozen feature films and numerous short scripts of questionable quality. Several directors have been enabling Chris Keaton's mental illness by...Read more

Pages