Shootin' The Shorts | Page 12 | Script Revolution

Shootin' The Shorts

Shootin' The Shorts is run by J.E. Clarke a longtime prolific screenwriter who loves to give others a little boost in the marketplace by highlighting why she believes their short script may stand out. She brings with her a loyal band of readers who share the same compassionate attitude who have joined her cause as it's grown and grown to connect writers with filmmakers on a monthly basis. Now it finds a home here on Script Revolution.

This is all about highlighting what makes a script great by focusing on the positives. You'll find no negative criticism or lists of issues here. Submitting a short script for consideration couldn't be easier, simply scroll down to the bottom of your script edit page and tick the "Submit to Shootin' The Shorts" checkbox. Please note; it takes time to get through all submissions, everything is subjective, and we're by no means saying these are the best short scripts on Script Revolution, they are simply the ones that have found an admirer within this section - CJ

Homecoming - Coming Home is Sometimes More Than Bittersweet...

HOMECOMING
A woman must travel through a strange and dangerous land to get to her final resting place.

Homecoming greets us with a post-apocalyptic landscape of decaying forests and crumbling apartment buildings; of weed-cracked streets and fairground rides rusted in place.  Towering over it all, at the heart of this forgotten city stands a giant concrete tomb.  Yet this is no imagined future, this is our recent past.  A moment in history with a legacy set to haunt us for generations to come.

Welcome to Chernobyl.  

Into this irradiated wasteland comes Eva, an aging exile braving the dead of winter and resurgent wolves in a bid to reach a place she once called home.  

Time is running out for Eva.  She wants nothing more from this world than to take her place among the ruins of her past.  But she soon discovers this shattered land holds more than just memories.  Something survived in the shadow of reactor no.4; and with it answers to the questions that have tortured Eva’s conscience since that tragic spring day long ago.

Can Eva at last find her release?

Dave Lambertson’s Homecoming introduces us to a haunting, post-apocalyptic no-mans-land before reminding us that such a world exists.  Yet beneath its gritty exterior lies a story of hope; of one woman’s quest to find peace setting another on a journey of discovery.  It’s not for a beginner filmmaker, but with access to the right location and a creative vision it certainly isn’t out of reach.

The Script

Homecoming

A woman must travel through a strange and dangerous land to get to her final resting place.

About The Reviewer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 

Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount...Read more

About The Writer

David Lambertson's picture
Real name: 

Hmmm - how does one craft a writing biography for one that has not spent a life writing? I'll give it a shot. I knew I wanted to be a writer when I was eighteen. I started writing when I was 56. In the years between I got married, had children, got divorced, got married again, had grandchildren...Read more

Girl in the Fence - Look Hard Enough, and You'll See....

The Girl in the Fence
An anomaly in an online photo opens a divide between a childless couple which may be resolved if only they can understand what the photo is trying to reveal.

Have you ever looked at a pile of scattered puzzle pieces of a landscape scene and thought, “Oh, how beautiful.” Probably not.  But, as you twist and turn the shapes and begin to interlock the pieces, something that was merely cardboard cutouts soon forms an image of beauty that resonates with you.

And have you searched through that same pile, looking for one piece in particular to fill in the gap, just for the satisfaction of making it complete?

And then if you try hard enough once more: can you even picture yourself there, in that scene enjoying the beauty of it all?

In Anthony Cawood’s “The Girl in the Fence,”  Jodie believes she has found something that will fill the gap in her life. But her husband Grady doesn’t quite see things the way she does.

JODIE
Hey, take a look at this.

GRADY, 50s, balding and bespectacled enters the room carrying a bowl of soup.

GRADY
Can I eat first?

He holds up the bowl.

JODIE
No, this first... it's... beautiful.

He raises an eyebrow, but sees she's excited, so acquiesces. He puts the bowl down and joins her on the couch.

GRADY
So?

Jodie turns the laptop round a bit so he can see better.
INSERT: Laptop screen Street view, large garden fence, a few cars.
Jodie toggles the view round a little, a gate, more cars.

JODIE
See?

GRADY
Yes, our street, our fence, fame at last.

JODIE
No, not that, this.

INSERT: Laptop screen She zooms in on the screen, their garden fence looms large.

JODIE
Now?

GRADY
No... wait…

A finger points at a knot in the wood of the fence.

JODIE
It's a --

GRADY
(sarcastic)
A knot in the wood that looks a bit like a face.

She pushes his hand off the keyboard and zooms in some more. The face projects from the wall.

JODIE
It's a girl.

GRADY
If you say so.

JODIE
I do. Wonder how it got there?

GRADY
Well, the fence has been there forever.

He smiles, amused with his own joke.

JODIE
Let's go check.

GRADY
Now?

He points to the window, it’s pitch black outside. Jodie is already up and heading out of the room.

GRADY
Apparently so.

However, in order to appreciate the beauty of life’s enchantments, one’s desires must far exceed one’s need for proof of the extraordinary. And in this case, Jodie’s desires lead her on a magical path to discovery.

“The Girl in the Fence” gently weaves the sadness of an irreplaceable loss with the magical wonders of following your heart.

But, be warned, this isn’t a script that you can take at face value, because maybe, just maybe this is the remarkable journey you’ve been waiting to discover for yourself.

The Script

The Girl in the Fence

An anomaly in an online photo opens a divide between a childless couple which may be resolved if only they can understand what the photo is trying to reveal.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen short screenplays, three feature screenplays and two TV pilots. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood...Read more

About The Writer

Anthony Cawood's picture
Real name: 

Award-winning screenwriter with one feature produced and a further four features optioned or in pre-production. In addition to features, he has over forty short scripts produced/sold/optioned - including ten filmed. Also occasionally pens screenwriting articles, interviews with writers and...Read more

Empty Spaces - And the Voids They Fill....

Empty Spaces
Two sisters struggle with the loss of their father and wonder if and how they can move on.

 

Do we, as children, truly know our parents? And do we, as parents, let our children truly know us?

When growing up in a family environment, the order of birth, gender, and personality traits all play significant roles in how each individual child perceives their parents. And when one parent finds solace in a bottle, unveiling that reason is sometimes left to those who pay more attention to who their parents really are as opposed to who they want them to be.

Then, more often than not, when the oldest moves out of the unhappy home, the siblings who are left behind feel resentful as if they’ve been abandoned and are no longer loved. But, in reality, nothing could be farther from the truth.

This rings true between the sisters, Debbie and Aiden, in Jessica Waters’ “Empty Spaces.” And the dialogue in this script rings sharp, indeed:

DEBBIE
You’ve been eating nothing but nicotine for the past two days. Mom’s worried.

AIDEN
And you?

DEBBIE
I was worried too until I spent an hour being chastised by mom. Now I’m thinking of picking up the old habit again.

AIDEN
That’s what habits are for.

Aiden digs around in her pocket and pulls out a cigarette a moment later. She holds it out to Debbie who reluctantly takes it. Aiden pulls out a lighter and does the honors for her sister.

DEBBIE
You’re not a pod person, right? I mean you’re still...you?

AIDEN
What the hell does that mean?

DEBBIE
I just don’t wanna lose you.

Debbie takes a long drag of the cigarette. A moment later she’s doubled over coughing, Aiden pats her back playfully until Debbie regains her composure.

AIDEN
You know I don’t know how to act. I can’t sit at the kitchen table drowning in bullshit memories that mom’s created for him. I can’t.

DEBBIE
So love him how he was.

AIDEN
You can’t love someone who spent the past five years consumed by the thought that he’d rather live for booze than live for us.
(she snubs out her cigarette)
Well for me at least. You’ve been God knows where.

DEBBIE
I’ve been working. Don’t act like I abandoned you.

Aiden clenches her jaw tight. Debbie reaches out to her but Aiden brushes her hand away.

In “Empty Spaces,” Debbie figures out early on why her father appeared to have chosen alcohol over his family.

And later, shown symbolically through a box of their father’s photos, Aiden, too comes to terms with the reason for his personal torment.

In this one location, small cast drama, Jessica Waters’ “Empty Spaces” exposes the deeper wounds of a family dealing with alcoholism and the secrets it harbors. Forget about "looking in a bottle".... if you desire a solid, intelligent drama to wow festival audiences, a director need go no further than this.

The Script

Empty Spaces

Two sisters struggle with the loss of their father and wonder if and how they can move on.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen short screenplays, three feature screenplays and two TV pilots. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood...Read more

About The Writer

Jessica Waters's picture
Real name: 

I write stories that matter so that the world can begin to understand the necessity for the valuable representation of marginalized communities. I am a queer black woman, and that is essential to how I approach my writing; whether it be through characters, settings, or experiences. All my short...Read more

Thyme - Time Changes...Everything.

Where the Wild Thyme Grows
A curious young boy stirs the ire of a local witch when he stumbles upon a long buried treasure.

Throughout the ages, witches have been portrayed as vindictive old crones, putting hexes on victims for their own wicked gains.

In Steve Miles’ classic screenplay, “Where the Wild Thyme Grows” - Witch Marie may be old. And she does indeed cast a spell.

But Marie isn’t vindictive... and her hex may ultimately not be bad.

The subject of her spell is Caleb, a boy who uncovers buried treasure. A "scrap of idle mischief", Caleb is but 12 years old, and too innocent (in certain ways) to know the rhyme "finders keepers, losers weepers” can hold much more sentiment (and conflict) than the child-like song implies.

EXT. VILLAGE PARK - PLAYGROUND - DAY

Caleb sits on a swing. He tears the wrapper from a stick of gum, tosses it away. The wrapper tumbles with the wind --

The tip of a walking stick pins it to the ground. Caleb thumbs his mobile phone.

MARIE
Did you lose something, child?

Caleb startles. He turns to find Marie close behind him. She holds out the wrapper.

CALEB
No.

MARIE
Are you sure?

CALEB
Yeah.

MARIE
Then perhaps you found something?

She moves around in front of him.

MARIE
A small shiny thing. The kind of small shiny thing that doesn’t belong in the claws of a young magpie.

She stops, holds his eyes intently.

MARIE
Sometimes we’ve good reason to bury the past. It brings great comfort to those that don’t know they’re no longer with us.

CALEB
I ain’t found nothin’.

MARIE
You’re sure? Only I fear I may not be the last to come looking.

He draws back on the seat, as if to swing forward.

CALEB
You’re in my way.

Marie straightens.

CALEB
You gonna hit me?

MARIE
Where would the sense be in such a thing?

Caleb pulls his feet up -- Marie just manages to step aside in time.

CALEB
Then piss off, you old witch.

She sighs. Watches him swing back and forth --

A bad start to a relationship, no doubt. But - when a spell is cast for the right reasons, is there any harm in adding a dash of terror to the brew?

The visual imagery of “Where the Wild Thyme Grows” is laced with terror... and poetic beauty as well: everything from the hillside setting to an eerie abandoned cottage, where deep secrets of Marie's heart lie. Produce this script, and your audience will visit them, too.  Make no mistake: magic lurks inside these pages. Consider Wild Thyme for your next project, and let the setting and story cast its spell.
 

The Script

Where The Wild Thyme Grows

A curious young boy stirs the ire of a local witch when he stumbles upon a long buried treasure.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen short screenplays, three feature screenplays and two TV pilots. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood...Read more

About The Writer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 

Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount...Read more

Strayed - Love Requires Some Things Be Hidden... Right?

Strayed
A distraught little girl spots her mother stuffing a suspicious bag into a trash bin soon after her dog goes missing.

Disappointment in a child’s eyes can ravage a mother’s soul. Haunt and eat away at it. Create its own sore of sadness that can only be healed by an act of redemption.

As some wise folks often say, “A mother is only as happy as her unhappiest child.”

Brandi Self’s “Strayed” shows how one quick-thinking mom attempts to handle the unexpected...in her daughter’s best interests. She thinks.

EXT. HOUSE - CONTINUOUS

April gets out of the car. Stares wide eyed as she looks down.

APRIL
Wha...

Blood runs down the street and hits her feet. She slowly backs up.

APRIL (CONT’D)
Oh god, what did I do?

EXT. HOUSE - LATER

April finishes wrapping it up in a black trash bag. Begins washing the bloody spot off the street with a large sponge.

EXT. HOUSE - NIGHT

April crams the black trash bag into the bin.

RILEY (O.S.)
What’s that?

APRIL
(whirls around, flustered)
Oh, hi honey. How was the park?

RILEY
Bo Bo’s gone.

April sees a spot of blood on her own hand and quickly wipes it away.

“Strayed” shows that In the big scheme of things, death is a part of life. As parents, we do our best at shielding our children from the sadness of loss.

But, just how far should a mother go to save her child from heartbreak?

With a couple of locations, a couple of characters, and an ending that will leave you gasping, “Strayed” wraps it up nicely. But certainly not in the neat way you'd expect.

The Script

Strayed

A sullen little girl spots her mother stuffing a suspicious bag into a trash bin soon after her dog goes missing.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen short screenplays, three feature screenplays and two TV pilots. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood...Read more

About The Writer

Brandi Self's picture
Real name: 

I create surreal, carefully constructed stories that dissect love, morality, oppression, identity crises, alienation, and stagnation by catapulting characters into absurd, almost comically juxtaposed worlds where they must use self-examination as a tool for escape and redemption. 

...Read more

Solitude - Sometimes, It's Better to Face Fate Alone...

Solitude
A man abandons his family to spend his last moments alone.

Does anyone ever truly know what they would do in the face of death?

If you thought there was no way out, and your demise would soon be determined by an astronomic "glitch of fate":  would you choose to be surrounded by family or take your final breath alone?

Thomas J. Campbell’s short screenplay, “Solitude” explores the choice of one young family man.

The phone begins to WAIL again.

This time he does not hesitate in hanging up.

BZZT!

Seconds after he hangs up, a message appears on the screen.

SUZ (TEXT)
Oi! Where are U?!?!

He looks up from his phone - skyward. Above the tree canopy, he can see the looming presence of a large oncoming ASTEROID – a planet killer.

He watches it for a moment as it slowly creeps closer to its final destination.

BZZT!

SUZ (TEXT)
John?! Call me please!

BZZT!

SUZ (TEXT)
I’m taking the kids to mums - it’s best if we’re together.

John removes the bag from his shoulder, unzipping it, he rummages around inside.

If you thought your family might die in front of you, would you fear witnessing it more than the comfort it brought to be with them in those final hours?

Or would you try to prevent the image of your own death from being the last thing they ever viewed?

If you’re looking to film a one-character, one location, sci-fi short that questions moral choices in the face of impending doom, “Solitude” will certainly make an impact. Contact Thomas J. Campbell soon - before it’s too late... for us all!

The Script

Solitude

A man abandons his family to spend his last moments alone.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen short screenplays, three feature screenplays and two TV pilots. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood...Read more

About The Writer

Thomas J Campbell's picture
Real name: 

Thomas J Campbell is a screenwriter based in the south of England with a predilection for strange and weird fiction. Campbell's formative years where dominated by a love of comic books and horror films, a passion which continued into adulthood and would see him write for several fan-sites...Read more

Wild Flowers - Who Knows What Beauty Grows in Even the Darkest Heart?

Wild Flowers
A couple is driven apart by the death of their daughter, until her supernatural murderer intervenes and nudges them back together.

Through a subtle homage to a classic horror film, Anthony Cawood’s “Wild Flowers” brings home the devastation and emotional shutdown that builds between a couple when they lose their only child.

In black and white scenes with no dialogue, the viewer will ‘feel’ the raw emotions of grief that have taken hold of this 1930s couple.

INT. FARMHOUSE, KITCHEN - DAY (B&W)

Madeline sits at the table, head in her hands.

The kettle boils, whistle blows, volume increases steadily. Despite the piercing wail, she’s oblivious.

Ludwig enters, takes the kettle off the stove and leaves again without saying a word.

He scowls as he passes her. Madeline sobs into the silence that follows.

As they often say.... the mystery deepens from there.  Who is responsible for their sweet daughter's death?  Can Ludwig and Madeline overcome their "monstrous" loss, before the grief tears them apart?

“Wild Flowers” weaves a touch of haunting mystery throughout, but the 'aha' ending satisifies even more, and stands out.

For horror movie buff producers looking to take a classic one step further, this short screenplay packs an emotional punch that compliments the original in elegant ways. Scoop up “Wild Flowers” now.  The season of all things eerie is quickly approaching - and this is one bouquet of raw emotion you'll want to pluck!!

The Script

Wild Flowers

A couple are driven apart by the death of their daughter, until her supernatural murderer intervenes and nudges them back together.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen short screenplays, three feature screenplays and two TV pilots. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood...Read more

About The Writer

Anthony Cawood's picture
Real name: 

Award-winning screenwriter with one feature produced and a further four features optioned or in pre-production. In addition to features, he has over forty short scripts produced/sold/optioned - including ten filmed. Also occasionally pens screenwriting articles, interviews with writers and...Read more

Misplaced - Some Things are Better Lost...

Misplaced
A young boy explores the rows of an old antique store and finds something unexpected.

The ambience of an antique store, with its treasures of days past, provides an alluring mix of charm and magic to even a seasoned shopper. But add a chained entrance to a back room that warns with a “Do Not Enter” sign, and the temptation can be too much, especially for a six-year-old boy.

In Misplaced, when Max’s mother brings him along to “Grand Antiques” to get an offer for an heirloom, he marvels at the many rows and shelves of knick knacks and thingamajigs. And even though the antique dealer, with his disfigured face, gruffly warns the child not to go into the back, Max can’t help himself when he hears a jingling sound coming from the chained off room.

After he discovers the source of the sound, he finds himself in a seemingly innocent game of “Monkey See, Monkey Do.”  However, things are not always what they seem, as shown in the script segment below.

Max reaches out and their hands are within centimeters of touching. Max is suddenly jerked backwards and is face to face with the Antiques Man.

Max freezes with fear as he stares at the Antiques Man terrifying scowl. A deep scar runs up his right cheek, over his dead eye and up over his forehead.

ANTIQUES MAN
I told you to stay out of here.

Max can’t respond as he trembles. The Antiques Man takes a good look at him.

ANTIQUES MAN
Do I scare you Max?

Max nods.

ANTIQUES MAN
Then your fear is sorely misplaced, boy.

Max is frozen to the spot. The Antiques Man releases him.
.
ANTIQUES MAN
Get out of here.

The Antiques Man watches Max run and disappear through the shelves.

For directors who want to express a “Twilight Zone” type of horror through the eyes of a child, this one will meet the mark. With its detailed visuals and a well executed play on the innocence of youthful curiosity, audiences will certainly recall their own childhood fears. And if that isn’t enough, the ending creates an image that will haunt long after the credits roll.

 

The Script

Misplaced

A young boy explores the rows of an old antique store and finds something unexpected.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen short screenplays, three feature screenplays and two TV pilots. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood...Read more

About The Writer

Matthew Corry's picture
Real name: 

I am a writer who prides himself on creating original horror stories that avoid standard tropes and cliches. It is my goal to create stories that not only leave a stroke of fear through the viewer but also to create strong realistic characters to ensure the horror and tragedy is not simply...Read more

Mother Nature's Joke - Don't Fool with Mother Nature... Unless it's REAL Funny....

MOTHER NATURES JOKE
What could be worse than being a were-hamster?

Meet Harold.

Harold is an army vet traumatized by his experiences.  But it’s not what you think.  Harold’s trauma stems from an altogether more curious trait: his ability to ‘morph’ at the slightest hint of arousal.  While useful (and sometimes not so useful) for infiltrating an enemy stronghold, it’s long been a burden on his love life.

As Harold delves deep into his furry and frustrated past, increasingly skeptical psychiatrist, Mischa, begins to wonder if she’s been had.

If the first step to recovery is admitting you have a problem; the second is convincing your psychiatrist you turn into a hamster with every erection…

Yup. Stick with us. That's the plot.

Cam Gray’s Mother Nature’s Joke is a short ode to bar stool humour with a sprinkling of the surreal thrown in for flavour.  From the psychiatrist’s couch to a hamster’s eye tour through the corridors of Saddam’s palace in search of WMD, Mother Nature’s Joke threatens to poke more than just fun.  

That is if Harold can keep it in his pants long enough to keep himself out of a cage.

Make this your next comic project, and you'll have 'em rolling (furry or not) in the aisles!!

The Script

Mother Nature's Joke

An Iraq war veteran with PTSD reveals more than his psychiatrist was expecting.

About The Reviewer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 

Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount...Read more

About The Writer

Cam Gray's picture
Real name: 

Surreal comedies are my release, but everyone else seems to like my dramas so I've put them up here for the sensible readers...

Currently studying at the London Film School and in my spare time I'm attempting to get some of these wonderful pieces of work out there into the real...Read more

Dog Years - Memories Never Get Old... Even If Our Furry Friends Do

Dog Years
Take a trip down memory lane. The paw-sibilities are endless.

Fun fact: Did you know 1 human year equals 7 dog years?

And we should measure things in dog years. Maybe then, we’d recognize every precious moment for what it is. Sure, “What-ifs” are important. But our “right nows”: even more.

Which is a lesson Barley – the nap loving pup – has been giving troubled owner Bobby for quite a while.  Now in the golden age of his furry life, Barley’s still the best buddy Bobby’s ever had.  And that’s a realization his human companion confirms, as they take a trip (and walk) down memory lane.

From the very first day they met, that trip’s been full of moments one shouldn’t forget. For instance:

  • That day in the cemetery Bobby drank whiskey near his mother’s grave.  And encountered a then-puppy Barley… yet another desperate stray.
     
  • That time Bobby met his human soul mate besides a lake – while Barley romped with her poodle nearby.
     
  • The numerous nights Bobby pursued his passion for writing, and faithful Barley snoozed at his feet (rather than pursuing a tennis ball instead.)
     
  • And that time Bobby almost saw his journey end in a horrific car crash – if it hadn’t been for Barley slipping out the destroyed back window and finding help.

Yep: for Bobby Barley’s been there, every step.  But now that journey’s nearing its end – because whether one walks on two feet or four, time eventually catches up to us all.

Have you ever shared Life with a dog?  If not, shame on you: go adopt one now, and don’t miss out!  But if you have:

We GUARANTEE the message of this short will rip at your heartstrings and tear ducts.  It’s real. It’s human. It’s everything that makes dog-life worthwhile.  Much like the classics Where the Red Fern Grows and Old Yeller, Dog Years will suck you in (and lick your face) from the start. Short, sweet, and chock full of sentiment, Dog Years is paws down the most endearing story of man’s best friend that you’ll read in some time.

It’s like taking a long walk with a furry BFF. Bring this tale to the screen, and audiences will remember it’s ending for years (both human and dog) to come.

 

 

The Script

Dog Years

Bobby and his canine companion, Barley, go for one last walk, reminiscing about their eventful and emotional 100 dog years together.

About The Reviewer

Karis Watie's picture
Real name: 

Karis Watie is a screenwriter from Texas who was accidentally transplanted in New England. She copes with the weather by closely studying television shows and thinking up more dramatic ways to develop characters in her own scripts. She tried the spotlight and it wasn't for her because she...Read more

About The Writer

Jeremy Storey's picture
Real name: 

Jeremy Storey, originally hails from the United Kingdom, but now resides in Seattle, WA. He first discovered the joys of writing at school, penning short stories and collaborating on comic books with his friends. Coming from a writerly family, it was clearly in his DNA to tell stories. However,...Read more

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