Shootin' The Shorts | Page 25 | Script Revolution

Shootin' The Shorts

Shootin' The Shorts is run by J.E. Clarke a longtime prolific screenwriter who loves to give others a little boost in the marketplace by highlighting why she believes their short script may stand out. She brings with her a loyal band of readers who share the same compassionate attitude who have joined her cause as it's grown and grown to connect writers with filmmakers on a monthly basis. Now it finds a home here on Script Revolution.

This is all about highlighting what makes a script great by focusing on the positives. You'll find no negative criticism or lists of issues here. Submitting a short script for consideration couldn't be easier, simply scroll down to the bottom of your script edit page and tick the "Submit to Shootin' The Shorts" checkbox. Please note; it takes time to get through all submissions, everything is subjective, and we're by no means saying these are the best short scripts on Script Revolution, they are simply the ones that have found an admirer within this section - CJ

Dad's Famous Bedtime Stories... Famous in some Creepy Ways, that is....

If habits form at an early age, then I’m sure many of you reading this can remember reading - or listening – to bedtime stories as a child. 

Goldilocks, Aesop’s Fables, and ever more fabulous tales whisked us straight out of our beds; depositing us in mysterious lands where nothing ever seemed impossible, or out of reach.

For instance, animals had human features and feelings.

Often, it’s these very same feelings which gave the stories morals – and deep meaning that still resonates when one transitions from being the listener to the reader himself.

Still, being in the audience weaves a special magic all its own.  That’s an aspect to this ritual of childhood of which young Nicky –protagonist of Dad’s Creepy Bedtime Stories - is all too well aware.

You see, Nicky’s father tells him bedtime stories – throwing in gratuitous violence on the side. Nicky’s not thrilled with the Tarantino spin, but Dad insists - claiming it’s the most important part of the story for Nicky to know.

  • Princess gets her head chopped off? Shouldn’t play with sharp objects, Son.
  • The talking frog burned to death? At least he never played with matches again. 

But Nicky’s not fond of blood and gore.  So he forces Dad to read him The Hare and The Tortoise instead. Something that’s not scary at all!

But, Nicky’s dad has rewritten the script for this one too. And his version has a slightly different theme. OK – a major twist.

What’s that difference? Let’s just say it’s… hard hitting.  An impactful, informative lesson for parents and children alike, Dad’s Creepy Bedtime Stories is a witty and delightful short. Writer Dave Troop really knows how to tell (and tweak) a tale!

The Script

Dad's Famous Bedtime Stories

A loving father tries to teach his young son important life lessons by scaring the bejeezus out of him.

About The Reviewer

Hamish Porter's picture
Real name: 

That guy who does a load of STS reviews and writes when he's not working or reading superfluous interesting articles. My filmmakers Rushmore is Nolan, Kubrick, Hitchcock, and Eastwood. Psychological thrillers, crime, and dramas are my thing, but I'm impartial to anything that's written well and with heart. Surprisingly successful at helping STS writers get optioned.Read more

About The Writer

David Troop's picture
Real name: 

Dave Troop began writing as soon as he could hold a No. 2 pencil. In 2012, he discovered the beauty and the challenge of the five page screenplay while writing short scripts for MoviePoet.com and Simplyscripts. Dave continues to write and review short scripts for Script Revolution and Shootin' The Shorts. He currently is working on a few features and a TV pilot, and plans to take Hollywood by storm. Well, not really storm. More like a light sprinkle. Dave was born on the mean streets of...Read more

Disposal Problems - Some Days, You Just Can't Get Rid of a Body... er... Bomb...

A friend will help you move...

A good friend will help you move a body.

Only when it comes to friends, gruff man-mountain Wilson doesn’t have any. It doesn’t help that Wilson, a.k.a the Lumberjack Killer, likes to brutally murder and bury those he meets in the woods. But then Wilson likes to kill women - he just always has. What’s a guy to do?

Which is what he happens to be doing deep in the woods on a rainy night when he crosses paths with Smith, a.k.a the Gentleman Strangler; who it just so happens is out here tending the disposal of his latest victim too.

Awkward...

It turns out these two are familiar with one another’s work and quickly decide to shrug it off in favour of a little mutual appreciation. It’s not often you get to meet one of your own and, you know, talk ‘chop’… And besides, it’s lonely work digging a grave all by yourself and old Smith ain’t getting any younger...

And just when these two thought the night couldn’t get any better, young Dianna stumbles out of the darkness to join the party. Blonde, pretty, and all alone in the woods with the Lumberjack Killer, the Gentleman Strangler and a freshly dug grave.

Has this innocent rambler stumbled into a girl’s worst nightmare? Or did Wilson and Smith’s serendipitous encounter just go all the way south?

James Barron’s Disposal Problems delivers a darkly comic swipe at serial killer problems with wry dialogue punctuated with deliciously awkward moments of silence and a grad slam of an ending. A fun, fast-paced script with plenty of blood and fury.

About The Reviewer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 

Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount of plaid and uses a calculator for the most basic of sums.Read more

About The Writer

James Barron's picture
Real name: 

I love to write comedy along with the occasional horror/thriller. My work is frequently showcased on Janet's Shootin' The Shorts Blog (which is now part of Script Revolution too!) Feel free to check out more on my website: http://www.jbarronscripts.comRead more

A Cool Green Place - Cool Indeed!

A Cool Green Place
Just when you thought cubicle life couldn’t get more hellish… a disgruntled employee’s new office plant threatens to become a real job-killer.

The worst part about evil work places is there’s usually no escape.

While management delights in concocting increasingly ridiculous demands, employees are expected to engross themselves in soul-crushingly mindless tasks, all while touting the company brand.

Often the only possible respite for discontented throngs of cubicle dwellers is to cultivate workplace comradery by engaging in office pranks. For instance: browse the refrigerator to find appealing foodstuffs to pilfer from their co-workers, doodle inappropriate bathroom stall graffiti or seek vicarious pleasure through media spoofs of office life.

Steve Miles’ A Cool Green Place offers up all of the above…along with a murderous plant.

Protagonist Reuben suffers from typical cubicle life anguish: Worrying whether or not co-worker Frank will need the stapler that Reuben always borrows from him. Whether his unique ability to change the copy machine toner is valued enough by management, and if he can just make it through another day without going positively insane?.

But, today a new irritation awaits Reuben. Entering his cubicle, he discovers a novel addition infringing upon his already reduced space.

A Yucca plant has invaded his work area, irritatingly dangling its leaves over Reuben’s monitor.

REUBEN
What’s with the shrubs?

FRANK (O.S.)
S’posed to make us more productive.

REUBEN
Productive, how?

FRANK (O.S.)
You work better when you’re
relaxed. My guess, some ass-hat in
H.R. got a subscription to Forbes.
Don’t you feel more relaxed?

To his horror, Reuben quickly realizes that his new office mate is not your average Yucca.

The shrub not only talks, but also appears intent upon finding ways to interrupt Reuben’s productivity. As if such distractions weren’t enough, the shrub demonstrates an unnerving commitment to convincing Reuben to murder one of his colleagues.

Will the plant succeed?
Will Reuben ultimately unleash one of his deepest-held desires?
Will cubicle hell be eliminated for eternity?
Has Reuben simply lost his mind?
What’s the plant’s name? Audrey?
(Those unfamiliar with Little Shop of Horrors should look this up.)

Whatever the ultimate answer to these questions, Miles’ A Cool Green Place provides the needed escape from office purgatory that audiences throughout the world will crave.

The Script

A Cool Green Place

A paranoid office worker finds himself at the mercy of a caffeine loving Yucca who yearns for freedom. Freedom and maybe some casual murder…

About The Reviewer

Julia Cottle's picture
Real name: 

Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing.Read more

About The Writer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 

Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount of plaid and uses a calculator for the most basic of sums.Read more

Bump In The Night - don’t assume that old people are helpless. They were once young bastards, too.

Our culture has such a schizophrenic view of old people. On one hand, we infantilize them. Awwwww, they’re so cute and polite. Innocent beings brimming with wisdom, and memories of days gone by. Then we discard ‘em like yesterday’s trash. Old folks’ facilities. Left to fend for themselves in broken down homes. Especially after the children move away. They’re vulnerable to falling; breaking that oh-so vulnerable hip. Not to mention violent home invasions by ruthless predators…

Meet Alexander and Agnes, 60s. A sweet couple living out their golden years in a comfy suburban neighborhood. We meet them in bed. They’re cuddled together – fast asleep. At least until they hear a noise.

It’s an intruder. Baz – a strung-out teen junkie in search of a score. Alexander and Agnes slip out of bed, and tiptoe quiet as mice downstairs.

Baz grabs Agnes’ purse, and turns to go. But his path is blocked by Alexander, wielding a baseball bat. He tells the old codger to F* off, but Alexander’s not deterred. For a mortal battle’s about to ensue. An epic fight for the ages.

Low budget and high entertainment, Bump in the Night has loads in its favor. Colorful characters. A wicked sense of humor. Twists. There’s even a moral hidden deep down in here: don’t assume that old people are helpless. They were once young bastards, too….

Pages: 10

Budget: Pretty low. A handful of actors. A bar, and a house. That’s about as easy as it gets!

The Script

Bump in the Night

A foul mouthed burglar picks the wrong house and the wrong couple to mess with.

About The Reviewer

J.E. Clarke's picture
Real name: 

Known for her unique characters and plots, J.E. Clarke has optioned her feature length horror, "Containment" with Primestar Film Group (director Mike Elliott of Scorpion King 4 attached), her SF feature "Stream" with Purryburry Productions, John Noble of "Fringe" and "Lord of the Rings" attached.  Her fantasy/SF "Evergreen" (cowritten for Adam Zeulhke of Zenoscope Productions), is currently in preproduction, along with Entanglement...Read more

About The Writer

Anthony Cawood's picture
Real name: 

Award-winning screenwriter with one feature produced and a further four features optioned or in pre-production. In addition to features, over forty short scripts produced/sold/optioned - including ten filmed. Also occasionally pens screenwriting articles, interviews with writers and filmmakers, and even a short story or two. You can find out more at www.anthonycawood.co.ukRead more

Teddy Bear - Is This One You Want to Hug?

Was it not ever so? People fear that which they do not know.

Sadly, the endless list goes on and on:

Fear of flying, for plane newbies.
Fear of other cultures for those less travelled.
And if you're a parochial parent, fear of that odd new neighbor who hangs a teddy bear off his porch eaves. Actually, that last one’s kinda weird. Still, all one has to really do is… ask.

With his deeper-than-it-seems short script Teddy Bear, writer Anthony Cawood demonstrates how stereotyping can result in tragic misunderstandings.

Bear’s simple plot reels in readers quick: a group of mollycoddling young moms find themselves biting their nails over the new arrival on their street – a mysterious stranger who moves in at night, and immediately hangs a teddy bear out to decorate. Alpha pack fuss-budget Janet is stridently loud – anyone who does must be a pedophile! Right?

Future discoveries heighten the cliques’ worries. It turns out the newcomer on the block is: A man. Very old. And a foreigner. All red flags – if one’s mind works that way.

One childless woman in Janet’s social circle (Pat) extends a timid olive branch to the new neighbor. After speaking to him briefly, Pat rules him to be… quirky but harmless. But the others aren’t convinced.

As usual, it’s Janet that who voices their dark concerns:

JANET
But what about the Teddy?

An unanswerable question. Who knows?

Before long, the situation rolls out of control. Especially when Janet’s son accidentally throws a ball into the new neighbor’s garden. He ventures over it to retrieve it – trespassing on the lawn.

Is Pat the sane one here? Or will Janet's worst fears come true?

No matter which scenario plays out, Teddy Bear is a clever drama that uses everyday situations to assert its message: that judging someone before you get to know them leads to the worst kinds of risks….

The Script

Teddy Bear

An elderly immigrant moves to a new home, will it be different this time or will he suffer the small minded bigotry that has dogged his entire life?

About The Reviewer

Hamish Porter's picture
Real name: 

That guy who does a load of STS reviews and writes when he's not working or reading superfluous interesting articles. My filmmakers Rushmore is Nolan, Kubrick, Hitchcock, and Eastwood. Psychological thrillers, crime, and dramas are my thing, but I'm impartial to anything that's written well and with heart. Surprisingly successful at helping STS writers get optioned.Read more

About The Writer

Anthony Cawood's picture
Real name: 

Award-winning screenwriter with one feature produced and a further four features optioned or in pre-production. In addition to features, over forty short scripts produced/sold/optioned - including ten filmed. Also occasionally pens screenwriting articles, interviews with writers and filmmakers, and even a short story or two. You can find out more at www.anthonycawood.co.ukRead more

Compulsion - a dark, brooding suspenseful tale much like classic Alfred Hitchcock films

Compulsion – A strong, usually irresistible impulse to perform an act; especially one that is irrational or contrary to one’s will.

We all have them to some degree:

  • Turning on and off light switches a certain number of times before leaving a room.
  • Sticking your money in your wallet or purse with the presidents’ heads facing up.
  • Or the most common compulsion of all – watching porn.

What? Really? No one?

Fortunately, compulsions are usually harmless. Except in the case of Thomas, the antagonist in James Barron’s aptly titled short script Compulsion.

Thomas sits rigidly in the professionally sterile office of female therapist Dr. Selma as he explains his uncontrollable urge to photograph unsuspecting women.

Dr. Selma worries that Thomas’s compulsion and fantasies may lead to more dangerous behavior.

And speaking of unsuspecting women…

As the session goes on, Thomas reveals his latest obsession: a woman he photographs every night. A woman whose scent fills every molecule of air he breathes. A woman who doesn’t regard him as a monster. A woman whose name rhymes with Dr. Melma.

Outraged that Thomas has broken into her home and invaded her privacy, Dr. Selma demands he leave immediately. But Thomas, like all good compulsive psychotics, has distinctly different plans.

Much like classic Alfred Hitchcock films, Compulsion is a dark, brooding suspenseful tale. Directors who appreciate the psycho thriller genre should analyze this short script. Quick – before things go… quite awry.

Pages: 5

Budget: Low. Two characters. A small office. A Hannibal Lecter cutlery set.

The Script

Compulsion

A dedicated therapist struggles to help a troubled young man control his violent impulses.

About The Reviewer

David Troop's picture
Real name: 

Dave Troop began writing as soon as he could hold a No. 2 pencil. In 2012, he discovered the beauty and the challenge of the five page screenplay while writing short scripts for MoviePoet.com and Simplyscripts. Dave continues to write and review short scripts for Script Revolution and Shootin' The Shorts. He currently is working on a few features and a TV pilot, and plans to take Hollywood by storm. Well, not really storm. More like a light sprinkle. Dave was born on the mean streets of...Read more

About The Writer

James Barron's picture
Real name: 

I love to write comedy along with the occasional horror/thriller. My work is frequently showcased on Janet's Shootin' The Shorts Blog (which is now part of Script Revolution too!) Feel free to check out more on my website: http://www.jbarronscripts.comRead more

You Destroy Me - fun, witty, and sure to win over even the most spiteful fans.

Remember the cheesy line from Jerry Maguire: ‘you complete me’?

The world of ‘You Destroy Me’ may not be that romantic. But who needs romance when you have lust!

On your mark, and get set – to meet protagonists Max and Grace. They’re two strangers in a park, minding their own business and enjoying lunch.

That is, until the twin forces of repulsion and attraction rear their ugly heads.

Try as they might to ignore each other, this odd couple just can’t help but exchange insults.

MAX
You know what they say about guys with big noses.

GRACE
Yeah. They’re ugly and stupid.

Bringing up a subtle point. No, not about the dimension of noses and quasi-stubby anatomical parts.

Rather, that love and hate are separated by a fine line. A line Max and Grace prove more than happy to cross. Think Pitch Perfect mixed with Bumper and Fat Amy: that’s the gist of the chemistry these two share.

As Max and Grace’s insults spiral out of control, the groping starts – actions so intimate that passersby stop and stare.

When it comes to love and ware, everything is fair. Abandon peace and give love/hate a chance. Especially when it comes to this script. It’s fun. Witty. And sure to win over even the most spiteful fans.

Pages: 7

Budget: Low – easy to cast and set in one location, this is an easy short to shoot. 4 actors – 2 guys, 2 gals. That’s it.

The Script

Daggers

A man sits beside a woman on a bench, but he gradually scoots away from her. When the offended woman questions his actions, it leads to a series of bitter insults which arouses them both.

About The Writer

Jason K. Allen's picture
Real name: 

Jason Allen is a writer and filmmaker from Nashville, TN. He is also a wilderness guide, nature photographer and award-winning journalist. His first produced screenplay was the 2009 feature comedy Lucky Fritz, starring Corey Feldman and Julia Dietze. Since then he's won Best Screenplay honors at the Nashville Film Festival, San Diego Film Awards, Mountain of Laughs Comedy Fest, TSA Screenwriting Awards, and Artlightenment Film Festival among others, and is a seven-time finalist of the...Read more

What A Good Boy Does - Or is Tragically Asked to Do....

Secrets. We all have them. We all hear them.

Whether we like hearing them, however, depends on the secret itself. Because some things truly are better left unsaid.

In For What A Good Boy Does, 9-year-old Bobby has a big secret to hide from his parents.

It's not his preference to hide it. Someone told him to.

Someone that neither Bobby nor his parents can afford to confront.

Still - Bobby's mother Julie notices something ominous is up with her son.

He's not eating.

He's wetting the bed for the first time in ages.

And he's asking some odd questions too:

BOBBY
When you keep secrets, do you feel bad about it?

Eventually, Julie discovers the horrible truth behind Bobby's emotional struggles.
But it's a truth that proves very hard for her to handle, as well.
One that threatens her family’s wellbeing to the core.

So Julie does the next best thing: explaining to Bobby that sometimes you have to do things you don't like doing to make those you love safe. In Bobby's case, keeping the secret to himself… to ensure the household’s “greater good”.

What is Bobby's big secret? Who told him to keep it hidden?
And why does Julie – a clearly loving mother – agree to go along with that?

All those questions (and more) are answered by this haunting and disturbing script.
Serious filmmakers: pick this one up and reveal its secrets to the screen.

Budget: Very low. A house. Good actors. Nothing more required there! Just do a terrific job... and watch the festival kudos roll in.  :/

 

The Script

What A Good Boy Does

A young boy discloses a traumatic event to his parents -- only to discover that they might not want to know.

About The Reviewer

Hamish Porter's picture
Real name: 

That guy who does a load of STS reviews and writes when he's not working or reading superfluous interesting articles. My filmmakers Rushmore is Nolan, Kubrick, Hitchcock, and Eastwood. Psychological thrillers, crime, and dramas are my thing, but I'm impartial to anything that's written well and with heart. Surprisingly successful at helping STS writers get optioned.Read more

About The Writer

Ben Clifford's picture
Real name: 

I'm an Australian screenwriter interested in writing drama and comedy. I am greatly inspired by the works of Peter Weir, Harmony Korine, the Marx Brothers, Todd Solondz, Andrea Arnold, and Cate Shortland.

My shorts are all free to use with my permission. Please feel free to contact me and let me know if you have any questions, comments, requests, or feedback.

Thanks for visiting my bio.Read more

Sleeping With Fishes - Slick dialogue, engaging characters and tense narrative (what more could a Goodfella want?)

Two wise guys.
A dead guy in a bag.
A lot of unanswered questions on their (and our) minds.

That’s a set of dark ingredients that makes for a very uncomfortable late night boat trip...
In Dave Troops’ gritty mafia tale Sleeping With Fishes, underlings Jimmy and Harry just have one job:

Offload an inconvenient body into a watery abyss.
Now, one should never toss trash just anywhere.
That’s taking care of business, amateur style.

No: the Boss specifically wants this corpse at the bottom of a lake. And we’re not talkin’ the shallow end.

This cadaver’s going deep; it’s a big, bold lake out there. And – while loyal - our hoods are none too happy. Who would be, rowing around on such a cold foggy night?

To top it off, one of these goons may well have a deeper motive in mind.
The kind of motive that leads to awkward conversations about missing money – while one’s rickety boat cruises through several hundred feet of ice…

Can these two work it out? Or will there be more than one man overboard?

You a fan of Quentin Tarantino? GoodfellasSopranosScarface?

Then listen up carefully. Sleeping With Fishes serves up a darkly comic crime drama – complete with slick dialogue, engaging characters and a tense narrative in a confined space to drive this story to the point of no return.

Pages: 9

Budget: Potentially low - two characters, one boat and some minor gunplay. Access to a boat (or two) is key to getting this just right. Worried about rocking that boat? Just think out of the box. Creative angles can pull this one off without much expense or fear of getting wet.

 

The Script

Sleeping With Fishes

Two goodfellas row a boat into the middle of the lake - will both of them make it back to shore?

About The Reviewer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 

Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount of plaid and uses a calculator for the most basic of sums.Read more

About The Writer

David Troop's picture
Real name: 

Dave Troop began writing as soon as he could hold a No. 2 pencil. In 2012, he discovered the beauty and the challenge of the five page screenplay while writing short scripts for MoviePoet.com and Simplyscripts. Dave continues to write and review short scripts for Script Revolution and Shootin' The Shorts. He currently is working on a few features and a TV pilot, and plans to take Hollywood by storm. Well, not really storm. More like a light sprinkle. Dave was born on the mean streets of...Read more

Toilet Horror - what every director searches for in comedy

Anxiety: psychological pain that turns the simplest of daily tasks into obstacles of utter fear. Like using a public toilet when one’s “bladder shy”. What’s the worst that could happen? Truthfully? Tons of things. A stranger could embarrass you. The bowl could overflow. Or… something even worse.

Fortunately, such happenstances are rare: right?

According to Spencer, the awkward yet intellectual protagonist of Toilet Horror, the many dangers in using office toilets are rife. Someone could be in there, and conversation at the urinal might ensue.

So – when nature inevitably calls – Spencer calls someone, too. His therapist, who assures him “everything is normal”. So a timid Spencer summons his courage and enters the room.

At first, it’s Spencer’s best case scenario. He’s got the urinal to himself. His worries fly out the window, and he successfully unzips his pants. Prepared and ready to…

To his horror, a man enters. One that both looks and acts kinda weird. But not weird enough to convince Spencer to flee. Choosing instead to hide, he ducks into a stall for privacy.

Sadly, the talkative stranger enters a cubicle next to his. And the man appears to be having some trouble with… dare we say it? The runs. Leading a horrified Spencer to consider what events will “pass” in there next.

Toilet Horror is what every director searches for in comedy. A relatable situation – with some tense twists and turns. Direct this well, and you’ll have an end product that’s the opposite of crappy. And the festival awards will… flow.

Pages: 10

Budget: Well, you’ll need a bathroom (but doesn’t everyone… sometimes?)

The Script

Toilet Horror

A man struggling with public bathroom phobia discovers his fears may not be imagined.

About The Reviewer

Hamish Porter's picture
Real name: 

That guy who does a load of STS reviews and writes when he's not working or reading superfluous interesting articles. My filmmakers Rushmore is Nolan, Kubrick, Hitchcock, and Eastwood. Psychological thrillers, crime, and dramas are my thing, but I'm impartial to anything that's written well and with heart. Surprisingly successful at helping STS writers get optioned.Read more

About The Writer

James Barron's picture
Real name: 

I love to write comedy along with the occasional horror/thriller. My work is frequently showcased on Janet's Shootin' The Shorts Blog (which is now part of Script Revolution too!) Feel free to check out more on my website: http://www.jbarronscripts.comRead more

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