Shootin' The Shorts | Page 5 | Script Revolution

Shootin' The Shorts

Shootin' The Shorts is run by J.E. Clarke a longtime prolific screenwriter who loves to give others a little boost in the marketplace by highlighting why she believes their short script may stand out. She brings with her a loyal band of readers who share the same compassionate attitude who have joined her cause as it's grown and grown to connect writers with filmmakers on a monthly basis. Now it finds a home here on Script Revolution.

This is all about highlighting what makes a script great by focusing on the positives. You'll find no negative criticism or lists of issues here. Submitting a short script for consideration couldn't be easier, simply scroll down to the bottom of your script edit page and tick the "Submit to Shootin' The Shorts" checkbox. Please note; it takes time to get through all submissions, everything is subjective, and we're by no means saying these are the best short scripts on Script Revolution, they are simply the ones that have found an admirer within this section - CJ

Midnight Clear - It's Always Darkest...

Midnight Clear
Nearing Christmas, a man with a peculiar talent attempts
to give his grieving wife the most precious gift of all.

“Stages of grief” have become a popular way of describing the numerous ways people navigate the loss of a loved one. But grieving is rarely unidirectional. Within moments of profound sadness, there can be instances of peace and even joy; flashes of happiness torn asunder when the reality of loss manifests again.

Steven Clark’s Midnight Clear beautifully captures the melancholic twists that the path of grieving often takes.

Married couple Steve and Bryn’s shared life seems ideal. When the script opens, they’re home together for the holiday. The house itself is cute; chock full of character and charm. Steve sips on champagne as he puts the finishing touches on a model village. He taps gently on the church steeple, the entire town lights up like a million dots of fairy dust. Magic. Or so it seems.

Bryn compliments her husband on the amazing dinner he prepared. Effortlessly, she clears the table and starts the dishwasher. As a favorite LP plays, the two embrace and affectionately reminisce about their first dance.

Continuing the late night celebration, Bryn and Steve take a walk together with their son to a nearby park. Steve leans back against the car – while mother and child play a game of hide and seek.

Basketball, tennis courts. See-saws and swings.

Bryn meanders around a jungle gym, searching. Another tug at her coat.

BRYN
There you are!

She giggles and gives chase.

But the specter of grief haunts them all – and in very different ways.

Maybe Bryn and Steve don’t realize it (or perhaps they do), but the harmony of their picture perfect evening will soon come to an end. The reality of their loss will return full force, leaving audiences surprised… and deeply moved.

Are you a director with a preference for naked, true drama – yearning for a story with soul? Then give Midnight Clear a read. If you’ve got a poet’s touch, maybe you’re fated to shepherd it to the screen.

The Script

Midnight Clear

Unable to forget the past, Bryn has just one Christmas wish, and her husband, who possesses a very special power, is just the man to grant it.

About The Reviewer

Julia Cottle's picture
Real name: 

Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing.Read more

About The Writer

Steven Clark's picture
Real name: 

A writer since 13, I began screenwriting four years ago as a more direct outlet for my creativity. Since then, I've had two short scripts produced, and two more optioned. My writing style is subtle and understated, yet powerful in its emotional simplicity. I'm currently collaborating...Read more

Bon Appetit - Savor this short to the max!

Bon Appétit
"A jubilant gourmet stops at nothing to please."

Ask anyone who loves to cook what drives their passion and the answers are universal: It's relaxing and creative, for family and friends that I care about, and I love to eat! 

With the abundance of popular tv shows like Emeril Lagasse, Rachael Ray, Top Chef, The Great British Baking Show, and movies such as No Reservations, Ratatouille, Julie & Julia, The Hundred-Foot Journey and Burnt, it's easy for any wanna-be-chef to satisfy their craving.

Bon Appétit, Barry Katz's one-page script, presents a gourmet Chef preparing an exquisite meal. The mood has been set -- classical music plays in the background and candles are lit -- and he revels in the "zone."

"The chef slices and dices meat and veggies with the precision of a surgeon. He sautées the medley, humming along while his razor-sharp utensils clang against the cookware in a syncopated beat."

When steam envelops the kitchen, "the chef takes in the aroma, wafting it toward his flaring nostrils."

His chef-d'oeuvre is almost complete. Ahhh, bellissimo...

Does the chef labor for his own pleasure? Or, is his exuberance for a deserving and grateful recipient? 

Bon Appétit  is an endearing script. Short and sweet, it's certain to satisfy any director with exceptional taste.

The Script

Bon Appétit

A jubilant gourmet stops at nothing to please.

About The Reviewer

KP Mackie's picture
Real name: 

Über reader. I enjoy writing animated scripts, historical-fiction and westerns, when I'm not reading or researching new story ideas. So many ideas, so little time...

Script Revolution is a great place to interact with old friends and make new friends. It's all about networking!  ;D  ...Read more

About The Writer

Barry Katz's picture
Real name: 

I have enjoyed creative writing from as far back as I can remember. It's the one talent in life I can truly say I have. While I don't currently make my living as a screenwriter, it is certainly something I aspire to do. For now, I enjoy the art of making art and most of all, I enjoy...Read more

Pillow Girl - Hittin' Hard!

The Painful Side of the Pillow
Pillow Girl is determined to fight to create a better society.
But, evil is lurking in some very unexpected places…

Who has never experienced a desire for superpowers to miraculously make the worst of their troubles merely disappear? Most comic strip and film superheroes fall into “superherohood” because of some unplanned event-such as being born with superpowers, drinking some potion, or suffering an accident- that permanently alters their physical constitution and consequently limits their ability to pursue other less noble career goals. Sometimes reluctantly, other times enthusiastically, they choose to pursue their calling and bravely set out to eradicate evil.

For Tabitha, the protagonist in Jason K. Allen’s latest work, The Painful Side of the Pillow, becoming a superhero is a conscious decision. From a young age, she knows that she would like to deploy her budding pillow-fighting abilities “… to make a positive impact on society.” She determinedly develops her skills to become the superhero she always wanted to be …Pillow Girl.

In the tradition of superheroes like the Electric Company’s Letterman, Pillow Girl is a gentle superhero. She doesn’t kill off villains or save the world from total destruction. She simply encourages people to do the right thing. And, she achieves that with a superpower that is comic. Viewers will love the campy humor as Pillow Girl thwarts everyday minor transgressions to the raving praises of the witnesses to her noble deeds.

There is so much fun in this piece that viewers will be surprised when the story twists to reveal a dark side to Pillow Girl’s trajectory of which even she was unaware, along with an enemy she had no idea existed. 

The Painful Side of the Pillow proves both entertaining and extremely provocative as it probes common understandings about heroes and villains, strength and weakness, and good and evil. You won’t rest until you see this one!

The Script

Pillow Girl

As a little girl, Kayley never lost a pillow fight. Now an adult, she decides to use this talent to fight evil and impact the world.

About The Reviewer

Julia Cottle's picture
Real name: 

Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing.Read more

About The Writer

Jason K. Allen's picture
Real name: 

Jason Allen is a writer and filmmaker from Nashville, TN. He is also a wilderness guide, nature photographer and award-winning journalist. His first produced screenplay was the 2009 feature comedy Lucky Fritz, starring Corey Feldman and Julia Dietze. Since then he's won Best Screenplay...Read more

$1.50 a Scoop - Summer Days Don't Get Better Than This!

$1.50 A Scoop
A boy just wanted some ice cream.  Little did he know everything that came with the $1.50 scoop…

Audiences always love a riveting story about two very different people; from opposite ends of the tracks. Ones whose lives come crashing into each other like a runaway train. Especially when one is so good. And the other… so very, very bad.

Even more exciting is what happens next: when the “nice” get ensnared in “naughty” schemes.

Think Oliver and the Artful Dodger, for one. Other classics work as well: Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn. And then there’s Les Miz – Javert and Jean Valjean. Cosette and Eponine.

In every instance, the conflicting enticement’s the same. We just can’t wait to see if good prevails, or evil triumphs above all. Do the characters eventually switch roles? Or will everyone just brush the dust off their lapels, and climb unsteadily to their feet?

After all, the Artful Dodger and Fagin dance off in just that manner – continuing on the same path they’ve tread every day. But folks, character arcs should never be predictable… no matter what STC might say.

And that’s the excitement Khamanna Iskandarova dishes up in $1.50 a Scoop, a little drama as sweet as pure ice cream.

In Scoop, Greg and Mike couldn’t be more different. Mike’s only twelve years old – sweet, considerate… and mute. Greg is eighteen – tougher than steel, and a thief. But they do have one thing in common. Both boys looooove their ice cream.

Their paths cross as Mike is counting out coins he’s collected to see if he can afford $1.50 for a single scoop. Greg’s got considerably more moolah – so he buys his cone, and tosses Mike the change. A grateful Mike seizes the moment, and selects the flavor he’s been eying all this time.

But right as Mike’s about to enjoy a much-awaited treat, he sees Greg steal from an elderly woman. Souring the taste of the ice cream Greg’s paid for – before it reaches poor Mike’s mouth.

Being the good kid he is, Mike just wants to do the right thing.

But the tables swiftly turn – leaving Mike accused of the very crime that “belongs” to Greg. Ironically, Greg’s the only one who can save him. But will a hardened thief ever change his ways? Will Mike ever enjoy ice cream again?

A sweet little drama that’ll be a breeze to film (and a favorite of festivals everywhere), $1.50 a Scoop takes little Mike on a journey he’ll never forget. Nor will your audience. We guarantee.

The Script

I.50 A Scoop

A mute 12-year-old boy says no to free ice-cream from a nice man when seeing the latter steal from an old lady

About The Reviewer

Julia Cottle's picture
Real name: 

Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing.Read more

About The Writer

Khamanna Iskandarova's picture

I'm originally from Baku, Azerbaijan but reside in the US at the moment. I've done a lot of writing and achieved some results. My latest achievement is being placed in the top 5 of the BlueCat feature competition which encountered 2,472 feature works for that year. 

 Read more

Calling Home - A Call You Don't Want to Miss

CALLING HOME
A driven depression therapist enjoys her star client's final moments with her at the top of a bridge.

On the surface, Calling Home by Nikki April Lee is a timely tale about the tragic implications of the psychological suffocation inherent to trauma. An intense, invisible pain that erodes the soul, causing such suffering that sometimes there is only one way out.

But beneath the veneer of Lee’s story is something more sinister and fatalistic that poses a unique question about the ultimate value of trying to help those who are beyond salvation.

The story starts with a set of women sitting in circle, attending what must be a support group lead by Mya Sanders. A thoughtful, quietly strong spiritualist determined to impart her affirmative wisdom on the women who attentively hang on her every word.

MYA
Everyday is a struggle, but we must remember not to think of our lives in weeks, months, and years.
It only increases this pressure that is on your mind.
Think of life in minutes, hours, and days.

Mya grabs her necklace’s heart pendant with a semicolon carved out of the center.

MYA
Every minute your heart beats, is another minute you are stronger; a warrior; a survivor.

One of the women in Mya’s group is Skylar; a young lady in her late 20s, who has been attending the group over the past year.

She alludes to having two young kids and a husband. With Mya’s help and the support of the other women, she’s in a much better place now with herself and her family.

SKYLAR
I am. I feel so much better ever since I started coming here last year.
I didn’t think I was going to make it, but here I am.

MYA
That’s right, and here you will stay.

Mya indefatigable commitment to the cause of helping women suffering deep psychological wounds is admirable and inspiring. Nowhere is this more apparent than in her own home, when she interacts with her dutiful husband Charlie. He isn’t just supportive of his wife, but is in awe of her superhuman selflessness. 

CHARLIE
You are a hero without a cape, my love. Don’t ever forget that.

It would seem no matter the time or day, Mya is the perpetual harbor in the tempest for the women under the protection of her emotional bulwark.

So, when Skylar texts Mya in the middle of the night, with a cryptic message that reads: ‘The Angels have called…’, Mya immediately jumps out of bed, called to action to rescue one her flock.

Or so it seems.

Calling Home takes a unique, yet brave moral turn that’ll leave the audience feeling unsettled and baffled simultaneously. Lee deftly sets up the story in such a way that when the morbid end comes, it’s jarring and disquieting, with far more unanswered disturbing questions than satisfying, yet obvious answers.

Stories like this rarely come along. A chance to make a movie that forces the audience to get out of their comfort zone and ponder some of humanity’s more complex debates, is the sort of opportunity a brave, filmmaker should tackle… especially if they’re craving to make a short film that will leave their audience speaking about the story long after the credits roll.

 

 

The Script

Calling Home

A driven depression therapist enjoys her star client's final moments with her at the top of a bridge.

About The Reviewer

Jeremy Storey's picture
Real name: 

Jeremy Storey, originally hails from the United Kingdom, but now resides in Seattle, WA. He first discovered the joys of writing at school, penning short stories and collaborating on comic books with his friends. Coming from a writerly family, it was clearly in his DNA to tell stories. However,...Read more

About The Writer

Nikki Lee's picture
Real name: 

The first time I started thinking about screenwriting was about five years ago. Since then it has been an adventure of a lifetime. Scriptwriting has allowed me to create something out of the smallest of details in life. Everything from a quote to a crawling insect can spark material for a script...Read more

The Oath - With Great Responsibility Comes Great Consequences....

THE OATH
A comic book shop owner, caught in a moral dilemma, is faced with the consequences of his actions.

For most youngsters, comic books are a rite of passage.  A whiling away of the awkward years before the onset of teenage shenanigans. 

Not so for chubby 16-year-old Marcel Stewart.  For Marcel, each carefully inked panel is a window to the soul of adventure itself.  So when Marcel lands a job at his local comic book store, it’s more than just a paycheck.  It’s a sworn duty.

MARCEL
I, Marcel Stewart, as a trusted representative of Champion Comics.

NATHAN
Do solemnly vow to uphold the dignity and integrity in which our customers expect.

MARCEL
Do solemnly vow to uphold the dignity and integrity in which our customers expect.

NATHAN
So help me god.

MARCEL
So help me god.

Cut to twenty years later and Marcel is running the show.  A little older and heavier; a touch jaded even as twenty years in customer service are wont to do. But Marcel has never lost sight of that guiding principle.

That was until he found himself holding a 1939 copy of Detective Comics #29 (in a 4.5 condition no less).

A musty old comic to the casual observer, but to those in the know (those like Marcel) this is the holy grail of ink and paper.  

Marcel freezes, not believing his own eyes.

England’s Crown Jewels. The Mona Lisa. A Guttenberg bible. The necklace the old lady from Titanic wore. This beats them all hands down. The very first appearance of the Caped Crusader, the Dark Knight, the one and only... BATMAN.

And Marcel is holding the book in his very hands. 

ACROSS THE STORE

Rose admires a heroic statuette. Inquires...

ROSE
So, see anything of value yet?

The problem is, this particular Detective Comics #29 belongs to the sweet and unassuming Rose Chance, merely looking to clear out her late father’s estate.

With the words of his mentor ringing in his ears, Marcel is forced to make a choice.  Little does he know that some oaths are not to be broken...

Ron Houghton’s The Oath serves up a tale of greed and redemption as told through one man’s love of comics.  A handful of characters and some fairly straightforward locations could see this quirky tale brought to life on a shoestring.  A great short script for any filmmaker searching for their next project.

The Script

The Oath

A comic book shop owner, caught in a moral dilemma, is faced with the consequences of his actions.

About The Reviewer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 

Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount...Read more

About The Writer

Ron Houghton's picture
Real name: 

An avid cinephile, and former film critic. In recent years I have discovered a passion for screenwriting. In recent years I have been fortunate to have five of my short scripts optioned, with four currently in production. In between work and life,  I am currently working on two ambitious...Read more

Zombie Romance - What Would YOU Do For Love?

ZOMBIE ROMANCE
On the eve of a zombie apocalypse, a young wife has to make a life or death choice in the name of love.

You’d be forgiven for thinking the horror staple of Zombies has reached saturation point and that our appetite and continuing hunger for the lumbering, rampaging, bloodthirsty undead has waned.

Future Box Office however, tells a different story.

There are some twenty Zombie horror flicks already slated for 2018/19 with titles such as The Cured, Little Monsters, Cargo, Patient Zero, An Accidental Zombie (Named Ted)Breathers, and Inherit The Earth, to name just some of the titles already released or awaiting release. These movies have big-name stars attached: Lupita Nyong’o, Ellen Page, Martin Freeman, Stanley Tucci, and Joseph Gordon-Levitt. Brad Pitt is returning in the sequel to World War Z 2, and the original cast of Woody Harrelson, Emma Stone and Jesse Eisennberg make their return in Zombieland 2.

Chances are if you’re reading this blog you fancy yourself as the next George Romero, Jennifer Kent, Mike Flanagan, Julia Ducournau, or James Wan. You want to make a short film with maximum impact, which means you need good material with broad audience appeal.

Want something with a little horror, a little romance, and a good dose of humour? Not to mention blood, gore, and a decent dose of foreboding and suspense? Oksana Shafetova’s (aka Miranda Grey's), Zombie Romance, has all these ingredients and more.

We open on Barbara, a young woman lying on a bed in a darkened room. Anyone who’s ever suffered a migraine knows the benefits of quiet and darkness. Only trouble is there’s some weird screaming and carrying on going on outside Barbara’s bedroom window. Rest and recuperation is not going according to plan.

We hear the fumbling of the key in the lock of the front door. Thank God, her loving husband Harry, is home. He can take Max, the dog, out for a walk. He might even be able to explain the weird auditory hallucinations Barbara is hearing from outside.

Maybe it’s all in her head.

Or maybe it isn’t...

One thing’s for sure. The words: ‘for better or worse’ and ‘in sickness and health’, are just about to be sorely tested.

Filmmakers: Zombie Romance is a killer script. One you’ll be dying to get your hands on. There’ll be a lot of clamouring for this one, so best set yourself apart from the hordes and get on it fast.

Contained Horror. One location, two leads, a mutt, minimal SFX, Zombie makeup…

And you’re set to go.

About the writer: Oksana Shafetova has always been fascinated with storytelling, but discovered her inner voice only a couple years ago. Graduated as an editor, she has worked in the fields of journalism and video game narrative, until she finally found her true passion in script writing. Oksana gets inspiration from cinematography, and empathizes with an audience to think up riveting plot twists in her own works. She currently lives with her husband, an illustrator, in Dusseldorf, Germany.  

 

The Script

Zombie romance

On the eve of a zombie apocalypse a young wife has to make a life or death choice in the name of love.

About The Reviewer

L. Chambers's picture
Real name: 

L.Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She currently...Read more

About The Writer

Miranda Grey's picture
Real name: 

Miranda Grey (Oksana Shafetova) has always been fascinated with storytelling, but discovered her inner voice only a couple years ago. Graduated as an editor, she has worked in the fields of journalism and video game narrative, until she finally found her true passion in script writing. Miranda...Read more

At Attention - When Nature Calls, You Salute!

At Attention
On a forest trek, a young man discovers that some of the finer things in life can present themselves unexpectedly.

It doesn’t matter if you’re a lady or a man. When you’ve got to go, you have no choice!

Meet Peter: a young man with dreams of the great outdoors.  When At Attention opens, Peter’s wandering the forest like a weekend warrior. Moments later… nature calls. 

Ever the polite city denizen, Peter heads for privacy in the undergrowth. But as he – and the audience –soon find out, our protagonist is far from alone.

Enter the Narrator: a mysterious gentleman’s gentleman “exuding nobility and bearing a contagious smile.” Wearing white gloves, he waves happily to Peter and points out a spotless urinal at his side.

In the woods?!?  How? Why?!?

NARRATOR
I thought to whistle, but didn't want to disturb his privacy.

Oh, Peter’s disturbed all right! 

He quick-zips, embarrassed at his predicament. The narrator beckons. Peter, alarmed, sneaks a look back the way he came.

Concern overridden by curiosity, Peter tiptoes over. The Narrator – well, narrates – along the way.

NARRATOR
He was, by far, my favorite of that year.

The narrator offers the urinal. Classical music plays to set the mood.

NARRATOR
Just good ol’ customer service….They all need a little encouragement.

So he says internally, all the while beckoning Peter to venture closer… even patting him on the back.

In every genre of film, mysteries like “what’s in the world’s happening” and “will he, or won’t he?” reign above all. And so it is with this short.

Who is this classy, calm professional with no earthly want or need? Will Peter conduct business-as-usual and give in to his urinal’s Siren song? 

Clocking in just over three pages, Matthew Portman’s At Attention is a brilliant surrealist comedy. Questions fly. Time does, too. And you’ll have a constant smile on your face throughout.

If you’re a director looking for a Yorgos Lanthimos style short for the festival circuit, you’ll love At Attention. And for anyone seeking guaranteed laughs, this script won’t “miss the mark” or disappoint!

 

The Script

At Attention

On a forest trek, a young man discovers that some of the finer things in life can present themselves unexpectedly.

About The Reviewer

Cam Gray's picture
Real name: 

Surreal comedies are my release, but everyone else seems to like my dramas so I've put them up here for the sensible readers...

Recently graduated from the London Film School and I'm now attempting to get some of these wonderful pieces of work out there into the real world. If...Read more

About The Writer

Matthew Portman's picture
Real name: 

Films:

  • FLIGHT - Written for a week-long student movie competition.

Accolades:

Next Stop, Salvation... Maybe

Next Stop, Salvation
A supply run turns deadly for a group of commuters when they encounter a monstrous storm.

The key to persuasive world building is to start with a snapshot: a pinhole view into a slither of a different world. This minute morsel of another existence offers a taste of something much larger and alluring. It leaves the audience or reader yearning to learn more. See more. Experience more. Which is why Warren Duncan’s Next Stop, Salvation short is compelling to its core.

Starting with the opening description, you’re immediately immersed in a future world, bereft of life and hope. The very definition of a nightmarish, dystopian landscape:                 

A gas mask sits propped on top of (Mac’s) head, ready for immediate use.

He stares vacantly out over an arid wasteland. Red dirt covers everything for as far as the eye can see.

It’s as if even the light itself is tinted red.

The aptly named Mac drives a rickety ‘heavily fortified’ school bus through a vermillion-hued city, characterized by dust and destruction. His task appears to be the pick-up of a few solitary humans to bring them back ‘home’. Wherever home is.

The first passenger he picks up is Linden: a woman in her 30s who’s been scavenging for supplies. It also becomes clear through their initial taut exchange that Mac and Linden are romantically entwined.

She flings her arms around him, pulls him in tight.

MAC
I missed you.

LINDEN
Me too.

MAC
How’s it go?

Linden releases him, removes the backpack, and opens it.

It’s filled to the brim with medical supplies.

LINDEN
Prosperous day, indeed.

Following his brief reunion with Linden, Mac picks up the twins, Cody and Kane, in their mid-20s. Both weighed down by items they’ve foraged and armed with rifles. All three passengers are in equal parts exhausted, relieved and fearful.

When a frenzied ‘operator’ sends a distorted transmission to Mac via his CB, warning of an impending storm, we witness the true extent of dread this unseen evil entity elicits from the human survivors.

OPERATOR (V.O.)
Mac - - massive – your way –

He lifts the receiver.

Linden, Cody, and Kane all lean forward to listen in.

MAC
Say again, not received.

OPERATOR (V.O.)
The storm’s coming! They’re coming!

Mac throws the receiver down.

LINDEN
Mac? What storm?

MAC
I didn’t want to worry you. It’s ok, I’ve got this.

Kane stands up.

KANE
You’ve got this? They’re fucking coming for us, we’re screwed.

What follows the storm is a nightmarish horror, one that’s presumably responsible for the devastated world in which they now live. Or, we should say… survive?

Their only hope is to make it through this storm to reach salvation. But at what cost?!?

Warren Duncan’s imaginative short will leave you at the edge of your seat wanting to both read more and hide behind a pillow simultaneously.

It’s the perfect proof-of-concept story for directors and producers looking to stretch their skills in VFX and world building production design. Likewise, if you’re looking for a story that emulates the vision and style of such greats as John Carpenter and George Miller, this script might just be your Salvation, too!

The Script

Next Stop, Salvation

A supply run turns deadly for a group of commuters when they encounter a monstrous storm.

About The Reviewer

Jeremy Storey's picture
Real name: 

Jeremy Storey, originally hails from the United Kingdom, but now resides in Seattle, WA. He first discovered the joys of writing at school, penning short stories and collaborating on comic books with his friends. Coming from a writerly family, it was clearly in his DNA to tell stories. However,...Read more

About The Writer

Warren Duncan's picture
Real name: 

I am an aspiring screenwriter from Australia. I have had multiple shorts produced and currently have several on option. I typically enjoy writing horror, thriller, and drama scripts. Please feel free to contact me at Warren_Duncan@hotmail.com or...Read more

Sweet as a Nut: A Tale to Sink Your Teeth Into

SWEET AS A NUT
A timid man has an interesting conversation with the owner of London sweetshop,
who isn't all that he seems.

Imagine - if you can - shopping in London. You walk into a sweet shop (‘candy store’ or ‘confectionary’, in Uncle Sam’s English), and the proprietor happens to be either Hatchet Harry or Bricktop. Would be a bit of an unsettling surprise, right?

Well, if you’re still reading this review, that means you immediately recognized the iconic character names above, having played key roles in two early Guy Ritchie movies: Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels and Snatch.

This also means you have a fondness for such movies and will surely want to know more about Jay Creek’s deeply devilish and sardonic, ‘Sweet As A Nut’.

If you still have no idea what I’m harping on about, but remain out of morbid curiosity… then you probably have nothing better to do. So feel free to tag along!

Meet Tom: in his early-forties, out shopping along one of London’s many bustling high-streets. Or as colloquially described in this story:

Grey. Dour. Colder than a witch’s tit. This is a London street at its finest.

While out and about, Tom discovers ‘Sweet as a Nut’, a distinctively old-fashioned and warmly idiosyncratic sweet shop that stands out amongst a row of non-descript, banal stores on the high-street.

Intrigued, Tom ventures inside to find a beautifully preserved, Victorian-style confectionary. Understandably, everything about this venerable setting takes Tom’s breath away. Which makes it all-the-more disconcerting when his fanciful reverie is smashed to smithereens when interrupted by a man behind the counter;

A gravelly, Cockney bark cuts his reverence in half.

HARRY
What the fuck do you want?

Harry is not Willy Wonka.

No, Harry is an intimidating ‘towering hulk of a man’ with the demeanor and general looks of a classic cockney East London gangster. In short… not someone you mess around with.

Squirming, and slowly dissolving into a puddle of befuddlement and dread, Tom spends the next few agonizing minutes vacillating between ordering what he wants versus what Harry tells him to buy.

TOM
Ahem. Can I please have some lemon sherberts?

Harry looks down at Tom.

HARRY
Lemon Sherbets?

TOM
Uh, yes please.

HARRY
Lemon, fuckin’ sherbets?!

What follows is a rather uncomfortable exchange in which Harry insists Tom check out a variety of other options... ones that may or may not be legal. Which leaves poor Tom flummoxed and beside himself.

Like Tom, the audience for this film will be excitedly disoriented and baffled by the end.

And that’s the appealing point of Sweet as a Nut. Not everything or everyone is what or whom they appear to be. Choc-full of succulent surprises and tasty twists, this script is much akin to Mr. Gump’s enduring box of chocolates:

You never know what you might get, but you know it’ll taste good.

This sly short is ideal material for the filmmaker experimenting with various narrative styles. And: specifically appealing to those who want to emulate the eccentric directing panache of Guy Ritchie and Edgar Wright.

Invariably, what you’ll produce will be… well, ‘sweet as a nut’!

The Script

Sweet As A Nut

A timid man has an interesting conversation with the owner of London sweetshop, who isn't all that he seems.

About The Reviewer

Jeremy Storey's picture
Real name: 

Jeremy Storey, originally hails from the United Kingdom, but now resides in Seattle, WA. He first discovered the joys of writing at school, penning short stories and collaborating on comic books with his friends. Coming from a writerly family, it was clearly in his DNA to tell stories. However,...Read more

About The Writer

Jay Creek's picture
Real name: 

Hello, I'm Jay.
I'm a screenwriter from England, who writes sweary comedies.
Since I was young, I've been a writer, making comic books with friends and writing stories. I'm also a photographer, specialising in documentary and sports reportage.

Below is a list of relevant...Read more

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