Shootin' The Shorts | Page 5 | Script Revolution

Shootin' The Shorts

Shootin' The Shorts is run by J.E. Clarke a longtime prolific screenwriter who loves to give others a little boost in the marketplace by highlighting why she believes their short script may stand out. She brings with her a loyal band of readers who share the same compassionate attitude who have joined her cause as it's grown and grown to connect writers with filmmakers on a monthly basis. Now it finds a home here on Script Revolution.

This is all about highlighting what makes a script great by focusing on the positives. You'll find no negative criticism or lists of issues here. Submitting a short script for consideration couldn't be easier, simply scroll down to the bottom of your script edit page and tick the "Submit to Shootin' The Shorts" checkbox. Please note; it takes time to get through all submissions, everything is subjective, and we're by no means saying these are the best short scripts on Script Revolution, they are simply the ones that have found an admirer within this section - CJ

The Resident - Time to Leave

THE RESIDENT
When the apocalypse comes, one care home resident refuses to take it lying down.

In the bed, BEN (80s) lies awake, a towel and razor abandoned on his chest. Shaving cream flecks his face and his blank eyes stare at nothing. Next to the bed, an empty chair.

FOOTSTEPS approach from down in the hall, running. He looks to the sound.

A NURSE races by his door. Her footsteps fade. A door bangs.

Ben's eyes shift to the window. Outside, a car starts. The tires spit gravel as it peels away. Then silence again.

When his nurse fails to return, Ben investigates and soon discovers it’s more than his daily shave that’s been abandoned.  Grabbing his slippers, Ben negotiates the confines of the Burton Lodge Nursing Home, shuffling his way to freedom in a bid to see what all the fuss is about.

Outside, he finds a world of blue sky, lost dogs, and impending disaster.  For Ben, it’s a moment of clarity as the looming destruction awakens memories of lost love and a chance to reach into the past and live out his dreams one last time.

Dawn Johnston’s The Resident is driven by mystery and neatly wrapped up with a bittersweet nod to the past.  This dialogue-free short script packs a lot into its 3 pages, delivering a simple story with universal appeal.  A great short for both first-time filmmakers and more experienced directors looking to grow their portfolio with heartfelt, visual storytelling.

The Script

The Resident

An old man who's been abandoned in a locked ward finds his way to freedom.

About The Reviewer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 

Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount of plaid and uses a calculator for the most basic of sums.Read more

About The Writer

Dawn Johnston's picture
Real name: 

I’m a Canadian screenwriter who specializes in drama, dramedy and darkly comic scripts.

My short script, Goodbye Today was produced by a local filmmaker and my feature drama script, Mother, was a Nicholl Fellowship quarter-finalist. More recently, I am in development with director Barnet Bain on a modern adaptation of a classic book. I'm also working with producer Sean...Read more

Branded - What Good is Heaven... All Alone?

BRANDED
When a drug addict who has committed suicide enters her new 'post mortem' residence, her only objective is to find her baby.

Described as the great beyond, afterlife, or the hereafter, ever wonder what it looks like up there? In Natalie Ekberg's dramatic fantasy, Branded, apparently there's a lot of pink and purple. The gated entrance is "bright pink and glittery, decorated with intricate metal pieces that intertwine each other and create various shapes." A big WELCOME sign hangs over the gate. There's a greeter too, Carmelita.

Carmelita, a humanoid Unicorn, beautiful, pink and sparkling, sits at the gate. Between her forehead and her horn - a police-like cap, with letters ‘HV’ on it.

CARMELITA
Welcome to Happy Valley, your new residence.
I am Carmelita, your Immigration office representative.
Your name, please?

It all seems friendly enough. But contrary to its colorful exterior, Happy Valley has it’s dark side, too. It's a place where atonement comes at a price.

Waiting in line at the gate is a disheveled 28-year-old named Lisa Goodman. Clearly, her previous life on Earth was no picnic. After Carmelita checks Lisa's name off a list, she suddenly pulls up Lisa's jumper. Underneath are "multiple bruises and needle marks."

Carmelita's prepared. Retrieving a branding iron from a drawer, she grabs Lisa's hand and swiftly brands it with an "A" inside a circle.

Lisa snatches her hand away.

LISA
Aaaaw! Are you mad?

CARMELITA
Com’on, love. We both know you’ve been through more pain in your previous...ahm...place...

Carmelita hands Lisa a thick folder.

CARMELITA
Your welcome pack. The antiseptic cream is inside, use as needed.
No painkillers for you. Obviously.
Cottage number 50343. Any questions?

Lisa takes the package and looks around.

LISA
Yeah. Do you do any other colours in here?

Carmelita smiles.

CARMELITA
You ain’t seen nothin yet, sista. Enjoy! Next!

Passing through the gate and into an open meadow, Lisa finds herself surrounded by yet more pink and purple. Pretty quickly, Carmelita’s prediction proves (pardon the dark but sequined pun) dead right. Among the Alice in Wonderland characters Lisa encounters next:

  • Drink carrying dragons on pink scooters.
  • A Pegasus style horse that provides “taxi service” over purple cottages.
  • And not-so cheery Peter, who reveals he expired from a heart attack… after Lisa admits she “used a noose.”

Scratch this glittery fairy tale, and you find real world Hans Christian Anderson Grimness underneath. Adventure, too…

… Because Happy Valley isn’t all cherub angels playing harps in the pink sunshine. Looks can be deceiving – and treacherous. Will Lisa find her baby daughter? If so, what price will she have to pay?

Branded is a visual feast. Guaranteed to get creative juices flowing, it's a perfect fit for a filmmaker eager to put their stamp on a scintillating fantasy; one rich in visuals - and real life pain, all at once!  

 

 

The Script

Branded

When a drug addict who has committed suicide enters hew new 'post mortem' residence, her only objective is to find her baby.

About The Reviewer

KP Mackie's picture
Real name: 

Über reader. I enjoy writing animated scripts, historical-fiction and westerns, when I'm not reading or researching new story ideas. So many ideas, so little time...

Script Revolution is a great place to interact with old friends and make new friends. It's all about networking!  ;D  
 Read more

About The Writer

Natalie Ekberg's picture
Real name: 

Hi, I am a London based screenwriter. I started writing full time 2 years ago and have written a couple of feature films and a handful of TV projects so far.  I just had a short movie produced and can't wait to add another one to the slate!  I am excited to be part of 'Script Revolution', a great community for writers and creatives. Read more

Food Fight - Ready, Aim, and... Bon Appetite?

Food Fight
A young couple takes a unique approach in deciding who will choose where they eat for their lunch date.

I’m sure we can all use a good laugh right now while cooped up in isolation during these very, very strange times. And I’m sure once society kinda/sorta gets back to normalcy, we’ll still be in need of some laughter to keep our spirits bright as we continue to adjust.

When the time comes and we’re all allowed to leave the house again, I’m sure one thing we’re all going to be looking forward to is being able to dine out again – I, myself, am growing tired of ordering take-out. And my cooking is just deplorable. But one topic of discussion that I’m sure will pop up, whether we’re with friends or with our significant other, will be choosing where to have our first post-quarantine meal.

In Christopher Stewart’s hilariously absurd comedy short, Food Fight, Lori and Adam, your modern, every-day, twenty-something couple, have run into this all-too-familiar pickle – deciding where to go for dinner. Yes, it seems like such a ludicrously mundane thing to debate over. But it can feel like a life or death decision once those tummies start growling at us.

Clouded with indecisiveness, Lori and Adam go back and forth, putting pressure on the other to decide. Trust me, I’ve been there before, myself. This type of debate can go on and on for hours. It’s actually ruined relationships.

But Lori and Adam’s relationship is a strong and healthy one. And, instead of continuing this potentially endless game of hot potato, they decide to settle this conundrum using a conflict resolution technique that they read about online; a technique that you’d probably only see in a WWE story line – an extreme rules, last-man-standing brawl.

Absurd? Yes. Hilarious? Insanely.

In one of Christopher’s perfectly timed sight gags, we then cut to a display of weapons laid along their coffee table: A taser. Baseball bat. Pepper spray. Baton. Steel pipe. Heavy chain.

LORI
No hard feelings, right?

ADAM
Of course not.

Adam grabs the chain and wraps it around his hand. He looks at Lori with genuine affection.

ADAM
I love you.

Lori picks up the steel pipe, admiring Adam’s handsome face.

Lori
I love you, sweetie.

They both suddenly yell out WAR CRIES as they charge right at one another.

If that doesn’t crack you up enough, the next perfectly-timed sight gag will have you in stitches.

As preposterous as this farce of a comedy short is, the premise is so simple and relatable that it just works. Part of the reason it works so well, outside of the sight gags, is because of Lori and Adam’s chemistry. Their dialogue is so nonchalant and casual throughout all of this, it’s actually kind of sweet and endearing – giving this Seinfeld meets Key & Peele-style sketch another unexpected dimension.

The Script

Food Fight

A young couple take a unique approach in deciding who will choose the restaurant they eat at.

About The Reviewer

Michael Kospiah's picture
Real name: 

Hey, what's up? 

I'm an award-winning screenwriter based out of New York City who specializes in darker subject matter and themes. My first produced feature film, "The Suicide Theory" won the Audience Award at the 2014 Austin Film Festival as well as the Grand Jury Prize (Best Picture) at the Dances With Films Festival in Hollywood. After a brief theatrical release and a three-year run on Netflix, "The Suicide Theory" is now available to watch on Amazon Prime, Itunes...Read more

About The Writer

Christopher Stewart's picture

I am a licensed paramedic and a lifelong movie fan. As a random hobby, I taught myself how to write screenplays by reading thousands of produced movie scripts. Since then, I've been dabbling here and there with story ideas and original short scripts. My real passion is helping others polish their work and doing uncredited re-writes. After all, a great script never finds its best footing without multiple drafts and input of those who want to see it succeed. Iron strengthens iron.Read more

Here Comes the Bogeyman - Heads Up...

Here Comes the Bogeyman
When an evil entity demands that a single mother choose one of her two children for a blood sacrifice, she must find a way to save them both.

He said he’s coming tonight.

Kids say the darnedest thing, don’t they? It’s always unsettling when that darndest thing happens to be something super creepy. Yes, it’s a very familiar horror trope. But it’s a horror trope that never fails to weird me right-the-F-out every time I see it in a film. It just works… if done effectively. And in, Here Comes the Boogeyman, it most certainly works – to very, very creepy effect.

But that’s merely the set-up to writer, Zack Akers’ atmospheric bone-chiller, which centers around another familiar trope in horror films and campfire tales alike – the Bogeyman.

The story opens with single mom, Mary, tucking in her six and eight year-old sons, Tyler and Devin, respectively, to bed. But, for some reason, Tyler and his older brother choose to sleep in the same bed. When asked why, Devin falls to tears, afraid to tell his mother.

“The Bogeyman,” Tyler tells her, speaking up for his older brother.

Like most children have at some point of their adolescence, Devin has been having nightmares about the Bogeyman. Mary comforts the boys, telling them it was just a dream and the Bogeyman isn’t real. Because of course it’s not. But that’s when Devin says that “darndest thing” – “He said he’s coming tonight.”

The comment seems to bother Mary as she talks about it over the phone with her boyfriend, Luke. He tells her there’s nothing to worry about, to which Mary reluctantly agrees – “Yeah, you’re right. I’m probably just overreacting.”

But later in the night, as Mary makes her way to bed, her doorbell rings… followed by four slow knocks at the door. This, indeed, turns out to be the Bogeyman – at least he knocked, right?

In what plays out like a cat-and-mouse home-invasion film, the Bogeyman has one unsettling request – “Give me one… or I’ll take them both.” Refusing to accept the “Sophie’s Choice”-option given to her, she decides to try and fend off the Bogeyman. But she makes some very bad decisions in the process, those moments that make audience members yell, “What the F are you doing?!” at the screen. This ends up resulting in the gruesome demise of the whole family.

Although it sounds like I just spoiled the ending for everyone, I assure you, it’s only just the beginning. And to see exactly what I mean, you’ll have to check it out for yourself. But I will say that it’s at this point that the story takes all these familiar horror tropes and uses them to create something truly unique and original. I especially came away impressed with how our protagonist, Mary, learns from her earlier mistakes (that so many horror characters tend to make). And, yes, I know I said she met her demise. But, again, read it for yourself. It’s soooo worth checking out.

This is the type of film I can see raking in some serious views on Youtube, Vimeo and maybe even Shudder, who I know lists short films from time to time. Atmospheric and suspenseful with some truly terrifying visuals and a gut-punch of an ending, “Here Comes the Bogeyman” is what nightmares are made of.

The Script

Here Comes The Bogeyman

When an evil entity demands that a single mother choose one of her two children for a blood sacrifice, she must find a way to save them both.

About The Reviewer

Michael Kospiah's picture
Real name: 

Hey, what's up? 

I'm an award-winning screenwriter based out of New York City who specializes in darker subject matter and themes. My first produced feature film, "The Suicide Theory" won the Audience Award at the 2014 Austin Film Festival as well as the Grand Jury Prize (Best Picture) at the Dances With Films Festival in Hollywood. After a brief theatrical release and a three-year run on Netflix, "The Suicide Theory" is now available to watch on Amazon Prime, Itunes...Read more

About The Writer

Zack Akers's picture
Real name: 

I'm an aspiring screenwriter who has been writing for over fifteen years now. I'm a horror guy. Love to take old horror tropes and put a new spin on them. Am firm in my belief that horror should be, above all else, scary. I've written over thirty shorts, quite a few of which have been produced. Currently working with a couple of talented filmmakers on some very exciting projects.Read more

Dialled Up - Just Reach Out and Touch Someone...

Dialled Up
A grieving old man tries to hold off the bailiffs in order to answer one last call.

What would you do if you could go back in time? Would you right an old wrong? Go left where you once went right? Or maybe just take a moment to say I love you to someone who needs to hear it most. It’s a hard choice to make. Now, what if that same opportunity presented itself every single day?

Every single day. Same time. For 43 years.

That’s what happens with Frank, a man beaten down by life and on the verge of eviction. Perhaps he’s gone a touch mad, too, alone in that small apartment with the faded wallpaper and sickly green rotary phone. Yet, there’s one thing that keeps him waking up every day. A phone call he knows is going to come. A call he must take, and answer correctly. For if he answers incorrectly, his son dies. Again, and again.

Somehow, some way, that’s exactly the situation he’s in. The year is 1977 and an impatient Frank waits, anxious, wanting to know where his car has gone. But he knows the answer already. It’s Andy, his son. Always Andy, it seems. He took the car again, didn’t bother to ask permission, and now it’s getting on 3:00 and nary a peep has been heard.

That’s when the phone rings. That sickly green rotary phone you’ll see throughout this expertly crafted story. Frank’s anger boils to the surface as Andy tries to explain where he’s been. But Frank’s not having it. Not this time. He slams the phone down, maybe like he’s done a hundred times before. Beyond frustrated and so done.

If Frank had only known he would never see Andy alive again, he might have been inclined to take it a little easier on his son.

An accident has claimed Andy’s life, setting in motion a grim daily routine that will last for years and years. By some miracle that stretches the fabric of existence, Andy calls again nine days later. It’s the same call. He’s still late and he still has the car. At first Frank thinks it’s a sick joke, but as time goes by –call after call — he realizes it’s not. This is real. Somehow, it’s real.

Armed with that new knowledge, a curious question is asked…

What if he can stop it? What if Frank can save Andy’s life by saying something different this time? Telling him to make a left instead of a right. Or maybe just by saying I love you.

Maybe there’s a way. Besides, Frank only has the next 43 years to get it right.

With Dialled Up, Matthew Taylor has crafted a powerful, easy to film 7 page story – one actor, one location, and enough emotion to fill the movie poster with laurels. It’s available to the right director. 

The Script

Dialled Up

An old man tries to hold off the bailiffs long enough for one last call with his son.

About The Reviewer

Steven Clark's picture
Real name: 

A writer since 13, I began screenwriting four years ago as a more direct outlet for my creativity. Since then, I've had two short scripts produced, and two more optioned. My writing style is subtle and understated, yet powerful in its emotional simplicity. I'm currently collaborating on a thriller feature -- and there's more to come. Much more. I can be reached at SAClark69@verizon.netRead more

About The Writer

Matthew Taylor's picture
Real name: 

I am a new writer simply trying to bring interesting stories and characters to life.

I have no formal training, just a passion to write and hours spent researching and reading. I would like to get involved in the writing community so that we can all help each other to get our stories to the screen.

If you are interested in any of my stories, please don't hesitate to contact me.

 

 

 

 Read more

The Other Side - Should We Peek... or Not?

The Other Side
A young woman and her boyfriend make the innocent mistake of playing on a Ouija Board and find out the hard way that the other side is not to be messed with.

Being home alone, especially at night, can be a little scary sometimes. It’s something we can all relate to, especially now, in our current climate. Even just the slightest noise can make us stop and conjure up the possibility, just for a moment, that maybe we aren’t the only ones there. Is it our minds playing tricks on us? Probably – which is what most of us tell ourselves in order to find comfort. But there’s always the possibility of a home intruder. Or, depending on personal beliefs, maybe something paranormal.

In Kirsten James’s spooky, supernatural horror short, The Other Side, it’s something much, much worse.

After having her boyfriend, Josh, over two nights in a row, Samantha finally has a night to herself. And she’s using her free time wisely – we’re introduced to her as she’s getting in a nice Stair Master workout while rocking out to music. Not a worry in the world…

We then see a messy coffee table, a mess she hasn’t yet cleaned up from the previous night – an empty wine bottle, some candy wrappers, an opened Ouija board, half a bottle of Jack Daniels …

Wait… a Ouija board? Oh, that can’t be good. In fact, specifically in horror films, the presence of a Ouija board is NEVER good. But Samantha doesn’t know she’s in a horror film. Just like in real life, people like to be scared for fun. And, often times, this “fun” comes in the form of a Ouija board – I am DEFINITELY not one of those people.

Right from the jump, unbeknownst to Samantha, there’s a dark, creepy figure just lingering in the shadows. Is it a person? Something worse? We don’t know yet. It could be anything. But it isn’t until a loud grinding noise from the kitchen grabs Samantha’s attention.

She inspects, discovering a planchette stuck in the sink’s garbage disposal. Immediately, perhaps to convince herself nothing is wrong, she suspects her boyfriend, Josh, is messing with her. As she looks around the apartment for Josh, she discovers more things that make her suspect that her hubby is playing a prank on her.

Fed up, she gives him a call – but we see that Josh is clearly at his own place (living with his mother), working on a college assignment. As things continue to go bump in the night, we come to find out that Josh and Samantha, under the influence of alcohol and munchies, may have conjured something up while messing around with that Ouija the previous night.

But there’s a problem – Josh says he wasn’t there the previous night. But… if he wasn’t there last night… who did Samantha have sex with? Did the Ouija board somehow conjure up some demonic doppelganger?

All those questions are answered in what plays out like a chillingly clever mash-up of Paranormal Activity meets Jordan Peele’s Us. Packed with all the things you look for in a horror story, The Other Side is a mind-bending, frightening read and that would translate even better on screen. I highly recommend it to any filmmaker looking to make some noise in the horror film festival circuit.

The Script

The Other Side

A young woman and her boyfriend innocently play on a Ouija Board only to discover the other side is not to be messed with.

About The Reviewer

Michael Kospiah's picture
Real name: 

Hey, what's up? 

I'm an award-winning screenwriter based out of New York City who specializes in darker subject matter and themes. My first produced feature film, "The Suicide Theory" won the Audience Award at the 2014 Austin Film Festival as well as the Grand Jury Prize (Best Picture) at the Dances With Films Festival in Hollywood. After a brief theatrical release and a three-year run on Netflix, "The Suicide Theory" is now available to watch on Amazon Prime, Itunes...Read more

About The Writer

Kirsten James's picture
Real name: 

In 2014 Kirsten was inspired by a friend to start writing short stories. After a year she realized she wanted to see her stories on screen and turned one of her shorts into a screenplay. She has never forgotten the rush of excitement she felt the moment she typed her first ever ‘FADE IN’. It was as if something clicked. Since then, Kirsten has written several shorts, mostly in the horror genre, with a couple of comedies and dramas thrown in. She’s had a few picked up for production. A short...Read more

Driver Les - Is Less More?

Driver Les
When their getaway driver leaves them stranded after a bank robbery, two thieves unknowingly hijack a driverless car with a mind of its own.

As a middle-aged man who grew up in the 90’s, it’s insane to think about just how much technology has advanced over the years. I was just watching Total Recall – the good one, with Arnie and the lady with the three mammaries – and I remembered, as a child, having my mind seriously blown by all the computers and holograms and neat, futuristic gadgets. One of those scenes that really captured my imagination as a child was when Arnie’s character hitches a ride with a computerized taxi cab (Johnny Cab, it was called).

“No way!” Is what I was thinking. Even in the mid 2000’s, I never thought a self-driving car would be a possibility in my lifetime. Maybe my imagination just wasn’t vivid enough …

Self-driving cars, or autonomous vehicles, are indeed a thing. Kinda. It’s getting there. There’s been trials and experiments, to the best of my knowledge – with mixed results.

In Larry Postel’s highly-amusing Driver Les, two bumbling bank robbers find out for themselves just how mixed those results can be. Right after robbing a bank, the two nincompoops make a run for the getaway car. But there’s a problem – the getaway car is not there.

With time of the essence and the fuzz in hot pursuit, the two robbers have no choice but to hijack a vehicle. But when they do, they quickly find out that they’ve hitched a ride with a driver-less vehicle named Driver Les. The driver’s seat empty, all they hear is a robotic voice.

With zero time to waste, the two masked bandits try to make the best of their situation. And, to their pleasant surprise, Driver Les is quite the host…

DRIVER LES (V.O.)
Would you care for some music? We have
R and B, country and western, blues,
smooth jazz, show tunes, classic hits
from the 70’s, best of the Eagles
volume 1…best of the Eagles volume 2…

ROBBER 1
No… no music.

DRIVER LES (V.O.)
No music selected.
(pause)
Would you care for a beverage? I have Coke,
Coke Classic and Diet Coke in my trunk.

ROBBER 1
I could go for some Mountain Dew. You got that? 

Driver Les turns out to be quite the gentleman. The robbers feel so comfortable around their new robot friend that they even decide to take off their masks…

DRIVER LES (V.O.)
They have no reason to check my photo
memory unless I report suspicious activity.
(pause)
But you gentlemen are very pleasant.
There is no suspicious activity here.
(pause)
Other than the fact that you are skiing
in the middle of July.

The rest of their getaway goes about as smooth as a getaway can get. So much so that the two robbers make an appointment with Driver Les for their next heist.

But what would a story be without conflict? During their next trip, our masked morons find out that, just like any regular Uber ride, things can go terribly, terribly wrong… in the most hilarious way possible. Packed with side-splitting, back-and-forth banter, especially the dialogue between the robbers and their new robot friend, Driver Les is sure to provide some much-needed laughs.

About The Reviewer

Michael Kospiah's picture
Real name: 

Hey, what's up? 

I'm an award-winning screenwriter based out of New York City who specializes in darker subject matter and themes. My first produced feature film, "The Suicide Theory" won the Audience Award at the 2014 Austin Film Festival as well as the Grand Jury Prize (Best Picture) at the Dances With Films Festival in Hollywood. After a brief theatrical release and a three-year run on Netflix, "The Suicide Theory" is now available to watch on Amazon Prime, Itunes...Read more

About The Writer

Larry Postel's picture
Real name: 

Larry credits his early interest in writing to his dad, a wonderful wordsmith and storyteller who had an advertising company he aptly named Post 'n Tell. Larry went on to study and work in advertising himself. His love of movies led him to screenwriting, with a focus on family comedy and character-driven drama.

A battle with cancer (Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma) in 2012 made Larry more determined than ever to achieve his dreams. In 2019, he had three original spec screenplays produced. The...Read more

Rear View - Objects in the Rear View Mirror May Appear... Well, You Know!

Rear View Mirror
An elderly gent with distinctly modern tastes wishes he’d never got a car with a reversing camera.

As technology continues to become more and more advanced each day, the more technologically dependent our society becomes. Many of these innovations change the world we live in and help us to perform tasks with great efficiency, making our lives easier. But when these neat, innovative gadgets we depend on break down and malfunction, it leaves many of us helpless.

For Ross, the protagonist in Anthony Cawood’s ultra-creepy micro-short, Rear View, that doesn’t seem to be the case. Always up to date with the newest advancements in technology, Ross is a well-off gentleman who finds out that one of his devices might be working a little TOO well.

In Ross’s case, that device is a built-in rear-view camera feature in his brand new, fancy-schmancy white Range Rover Evoque. Breathing in that still-fresh new-car smell, Ross is about to head out for a nice cruise around town to show off his new wheels.

But, as he backs out of his driveway, he glances into his rear-view camera and hits the brakes just in the nick of time – two small children in all black just stand there with their heads bowed. Despite almost getting plowed over, they don’t seem to be bothered in the slightest. In fact, it’s almost as if they’re purposely keeping Ross from leaving his driveway.

Annoyed, Ross looks into both rear-view mirrors – but the kids aren’t there. He turns, looks out his back window – nothing. He turns back to the camera and sees the creepy children again – a boy and a girl, no older than 10. And this time, they’re looking directly into his rear-view camera. Staring. Their eyes dark and soulless…

I don’t know about you, but the thought of seeing any children appear suddenly, out of nowhere, being super creepy, makes me shudder. And when you seem them in a horror flick, it’s never a good thing. But Ross doesn’t know he’s in a horror flick. Thinking it’s some punk kids playing a prank, Ross leaves the car only to see that the creepy little bastards are nowhere to be seen – What gives?

I won’t give away any more details, but Rear View has that creepy, skin-crawly vibe I got from popular horror micro-shorts like Lights Out (which later became a successful and pretty solid feature film) and Selfie From Hell (almost 30 million views on Youtube).

Like the shorts I just mentioned, Rear View is all about the scares and the creep factor. And it really nails it. Very easy to film (a lot of newer model cars have the rear-view camera feature built in), this could be that next viral horror hit – of course, in the hands of a capable director with a panache for nightmarish visuals.

Playing off the popular black-eyed children urban legend, Rear View is sure to make you think twice before using your rear-view camera feature again.

The Script

Rear View

An elderly gent with distinctly modern tastes wishes he'd never bought a car with a reversing camera.

About The Reviewer

Michael Kospiah's picture
Real name: 

Hey, what's up? 

I'm an award-winning screenwriter based out of New York City who specializes in darker subject matter and themes. My first produced feature film, "The Suicide Theory" won the Audience Award at the 2014 Austin Film Festival as well as the Grand Jury Prize (Best Picture) at the Dances With Films Festival in Hollywood. After a brief theatrical release and a three-year run on Netflix, "The Suicide Theory" is now available to watch on Amazon Prime, Itunes...Read more

About The Writer

Anthony Cawood's picture
Real name: 

Award-winning screenwriter with one feature produced and a further four features optioned or in pre-production. In addition to features, over forty short scripts produced/sold/optioned - including ten filmed. Also occasionally pens screenwriting articles, interviews with writers and filmmakers, and even a short story or two. You can find out more at www.anthonycawood.co.ukRead more

Relive - Life Takes Interesting Turns..

Relive
While rushing to the hospital, Ben and his pregnant wife, Anna, accidentally injure a mysterious woman with their car. When they try to help her, the night takes a very bizarre turn for the worst.

“Be careful who you help…”

We’ve all been there – whether in a rush or running late for an appointment, we’ve all, at some point, exceeded the speed limit to get somewhere quicker. But there are consequences to driving too fast sometimes: speeding tickets, traffic violations, minor fender-benders… and sometimes, much, much worse.

Driving past the speed limit is rarely warranted but, for Ben and Anna, it’s necessary, in Luke Anthony Walker’s twisty mind-bender, Relive.

We’re taken to a dark, desolate road in the middle of the night as Ben drives his very pregnant wife, Anna, to the hospital. With time of the essence and no other cars in sight, Ben keeps the pedal to the metal as they get closer to their destination.

Playing soothing classical music to calm Anna’s nerves, they’re not too far now. But that’s when the proverbial poop hits the fan…

A WOMAN caked in mud, with long, sodden hair covering her face and wearing nothing but a dressing gown, suddenly appears in the middle of the road with her hand held out, gesturing for the car to stop.

Ben slams on the brakes, jolting the couple forward. The car comes to a screeching halt, but still hits the woman, knocking her to the ground and out of sight.

Who is this woman? And what was she doing in the middle of the road… in the middle of the night… in the middle of nowhere?

Ben isn’t sure what to do – Call the cops? Wait for help? But, with his wife’s contractions getting stronger and more painful, Ben doesn’t have much time to act. So, he does what any good person would do – he helps the injured woman.

Already in a hurry to the hospital anyway, Ben loads the mysterious, unconscious stranger into their car – two birds, one stone, right?

But, as if having a baby wasn’t nerve-racking enough, they now face some pretty grim circumstances, unsure if the injured woman is even alive. Already at wits end, things seem like they couldn’t get any worse…

But they do.

Ben attempts to comfort Anna, his attention switching between her and the road ahead.

Unseen by them both, the woman sits up straight, her long hair dangling across her face.

She raises her hand and points toward the road ahead.

WOMAN
(shrieking)
Stop!

EXT. ROAD – NIGHT

A stag suddenly appears in the middle of the road, caught in the headlights.

The vehicle swerves to avoid it.

EXT. DITCH – NIGHT

The car careens off the road and crashes straight into a tree at the bottom of a ditch.

And this is when things start to get really bizarre.

I won’t spoil the ending for you, but I will say that the way Luke’s story unravels is one hell a trip. It draws comparisons to films such as the criminally underrated Mexican film, “The Incident”, and the also very-underrated cruise-ship horror flick, “Triangle”.

Relive is a creative, mind-bending read that would be a terrific notch on any filmmaker’s belt. And it would be one hell of a ride (pun intended) for its viewing audience.

The Script

Relive

While rushing to the hospital, Ben and his pregnant wife, Anna, accidentally injure a mysterious woman with their car. When they try to help her, the night takes a very bizarre turn for the worst.

About The Reviewer

Michael Kospiah's picture
Real name: 

Hey, what's up? 

I'm an award-winning screenwriter based out of New York City who specializes in darker subject matter and themes. My first produced feature film, "The Suicide Theory" won the Audience Award at the 2014 Austin Film Festival as well as the Grand Jury Prize (Best Picture) at the Dances With Films Festival in Hollywood. After a brief theatrical release and a three-year run on Netflix, "The Suicide Theory" is now available to watch on Amazon Prime, Itunes...Read more

About The Writer

Luke Walker's picture
Real name: 

Luke Walker is a self taught, award winning horror screenwriter from Bristol, England, and a stay at home Dad with two young Padawans.

Best known for short films 'Paralysis' (2015), and 'Mothers' (2020).
Feature screenplay 'The Guest House', Winner of Short Stop International Film Festival (2020).
Short screenplay 'Rose', Winner of 'Lets Make It! Screenwriting Contest (2016) / Antic Horror – International Short Screenplay Contest (2018) / 13 Film and Screenplay Contest (...Read more

Inbox(1) - 'You've Got Mail' Isn't Always Good...

INBOX (1) 
After receiving increasingly disturbing emails, a deaf customer services agent must battle with his mind in order to make sense of his night.

The workplace can be a very stressful environment, especially when it’s at a boring, mundane, nine-to-five office job. With constant worries of job security, the pressure of meeting deadlines and performance goals and dealing with the seemingly infinite monotony of each unimportant shift, the office is often the last place we want to be. But the one thing that gets us through each day is the camaraderie we share with co-workers, bonding over all the things that make us hate showing up for work in the first place. This is how some of our closest, most precious friendships are formed, many of those friendships lasting for life.

But, with so many variables and personalities, the workplace can also be a way to make mortal enemies – there’s clashing of egos, competition, employees fighting to move up that corporate ladder and, at times, bullying.

In Matthew Taylor’s dark psychological thriller, “Inbox (1)”, customer service rep, Freddy, isn’t having the easiest of times. Most likely the target of bullying his whole life due to his disability (he’s deaf), he takes medication for what we believe is either anxiety or depression. His coworkers haven’t exactly been very kind to him – Eric and Danielle mock him behind his back, spewing insults out loud knowing he can’t hear them. His boss, Ian, lets him know, every chance he gets, that the only reason he hasn’t been fired yet is BECAUSE he’s deaf. And even Christina, the only nice one in the office, speaks to him loudly and overly pronounced despite being reminded repeatedly that he can read lips.

After getting chewed out by Ian, Freddy finds himself staying late, stuck with the exhilarating duty of clearing the day’s email backlog – 523 inbox messages, to be exact.

Freddy sucks it up and gets to work, responding to email after email… after email. Finally, after hours of pedantic, repetitious tasks, he looks to his screen – INBOX (1). Ever so close to sweet, sweet freedom, Freddy opens up the predictably unpleasant final message. Trying his best to maintain his professionalism, he goes by the book and responds to the message with the utmost courtesy until finally – INBOX (0). Yes!

Ready to shut down his computer, Freddy gives the screen a glance and, to his chagrin, he sees INBOX (1) again. He opens the message to find out that it’s the same exact person as the last email. Freddy’s been doing this for a while, so he’s used to the aggressive insults thrown his way. But it isn’t until this “customer” in particular makes fun of his duck-patterned tie that Freddy suspects something more sinister is at play.

Fed up, Freddy confronts each coworker at the office, starting off with the most obvious suspects, Eric and his partner in crime, Danielle. A fracas ensues, Freddy’s deep-seeded rage boiling to the surface, resulting in him throwing a glass of water into Freddy’s face. But, upon further investigation, Freddy finds out that it wasn’t Eric or Danielle at all… so it appears. In fact, there’s no evidence that it was ANYBODY in the same room.

Determined to get to the bottom of this, Freddy returns to his computer to find yet another message in his inbox. He opens it up to see a photo of himself. WTF? But it gets even more disturbing when a virtual knife slides across the screen, slicing Freddy’s pixelated throat and splashing animated blood. As if things couldn’t get any stranger, the lights suddenly flicker off…

What begins as a dark, who-dun-nit mystery delves into terrifying, psychological horror territory. And Freddy is forced to explore the darkest depths of his own fragile mind.

In one of my favorite shorts that I’ve recently stumbled across, Matthew Taylor has crafted an atmospheric, pitch-black, psychological, single-location thriller with imagery that will linger with you long after the final credits roll.

The Script

Inbox (1)

After receiving increasingly strange emails, a deaf customer services agent must battle with his own mind if he is to make sense of his night.

About The Reviewer

Michael Kospiah's picture
Real name: 

Hey, what's up? 

I'm an award-winning screenwriter based out of New York City who specializes in darker subject matter and themes. My first produced feature film, "The Suicide Theory" won the Audience Award at the 2014 Austin Film Festival as well as the Grand Jury Prize (Best Picture) at the Dances With Films Festival in Hollywood. After a brief theatrical release and a three-year run on Netflix, "The Suicide Theory" is now available to watch on Amazon Prime, Itunes...Read more

About The Writer

Matthew Taylor's picture
Real name: 

I am a new writer simply trying to bring interesting stories and characters to life.

I have no formal training, just a passion to write and hours spent researching and reading. I would like to get involved in the writing community so that we can all help each other to get our stories to the screen.

If you are interested in any of my stories, please don't hesitate to contact me.

 

 

 

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