Shootin' The Shorts | Page 7 | Script Revolution

Shootin' The Shorts

Shootin' The Shorts is run by J.E. Clarke a longtime prolific screenwriter who loves to give others a little boost in the marketplace by highlighting why she believes their short script may stand out. She brings with her a loyal band of readers who share the same compassionate attitude who have joined her cause as it's grown and grown to connect writers with filmmakers on a monthly basis. Now it finds a home here on Script Revolution.

This is all about highlighting what makes a script great by focusing on the positives. You'll find no negative criticism or lists of issues here. Submitting a short script for consideration couldn't be easier, simply scroll down to the bottom of your script edit page and tick the "Submit to Shootin' The Shorts" checkbox. Please note; it takes time to get through all submissions, everything is subjective, and we're by no means saying these are the best short scripts on Script Revolution, they are simply the ones that have found an admirer within this section - CJ

Hitman's Retirement Party - Is a Celebration in Order?

THE HITMAN’S RETIREMENT PARTY
Retiring is never easy…

A crim’, a clown, and a cat walk into a bar…

Sounds like the opening gambit of a joke, doesn’t it? But there is no bar, and delightfully these three characters are the headlining cast of John Hunter’s screenplay, The Hitman’s Retirement Party.

A rather gruesome opening scene introduces us to titular character – Bill, 60s, balding, glasses, – an ordinary looking Joe Blow, who if you met him on the street, he’d easily pass for an accountant, a bank manager, even a local handyman. But Bill’s anything but what he appears to be. Fact is, he’s a cold calculating killer, fast, methodical, deadly. At the front door of a mark’s house he takes out a small caliber pistol, pops the guy unceremoniously twice – a bullet in the eye, one to the head, one final parting shot to the temple for good measure. As Bill says: It’s nothing personal…

It’s just all in a day’s work. After forty years on the job however, Bill’s decided it’s time to hang up his holster for the last time. A quick call to management to inform them. Now it’s time to kick back and enjoy the spoils of retirement with his loyal sidekick, Buddy.

Buddy is Bill’s best friend, he’s been there for Bill through thick and thin. He’s the one Bill comes home to every night. You might say he’s his soft place to fall – always eager and happy to see his best mate, Bill.

As with all great sidekicks Buddy is the silent type, but don’t be fooled, there’s usually a lot going on – think: Jay and Silent Bob, Penn and Teller, Han and Chewie, The Chief and McMurphy.

There’s just one thing though… Buddy’s a cat. A meow, perhaps an affectionate coil around the legs, is likely about all you’ll get. Despite this, Bill believes he and Buddy share their own special repartee, a symbiotic relationship of sorts, least this is what Bill thinks…

But someone’s about to come between Bill and Buddy, test their loyalty and their future happiness. That someone is a clown named Terry who just so happens to turn up unannounced at Bill’s front door, dressed in fuzzy orange wig, big red nose, large floppy shoes, and holding a handful of helium filled balloons.

Has he come on behalf of management? Bill’s last phone call did lead us to believe he might be in line for a proper sendoff. Perhaps the clown comes with a parting gift, maybe a nice gold watch, or a little retirement bonus? After so many devoted years of faithful service, it’d be no surprise. Or would it?

Well you’re going to have to get to the punch-line – I mean denouement – yourself. Suffice to say John Hunter weaves a Hitman story with a difference, cleverly executed through dark comedy, tongue in cheek dialogue, the element of surprise, and some rather lovely dry wit.

Our parting shot? That Hitman’s Retirement Party is a killer script, sure to draw even the best filmmakers out of retirement.

About The Reviewer

L. Chambers's picture
Real name: 

L.Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She currently works as a freelance web-content editor and lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia.Read more

About The Writer

John Hunter's picture
Real name: 

Former Peace Corps volunteer, big ticket sales engineer, commercial graphic artist, packaging design consultant and recovering golfer. More recently, I’m an award winning and produced scriptwriter living under the shade of a large oak tree in Central Florida. Four of my shorts have been produced, my dystopian horror Baby Soup won the 2013 Florida Independent Filmmakers Contest and in July 2020, I declined an offer from mainland China for my creature feature...Read more

Honey Mustard - Little Things Mean a Lot...?

Honey Mustard – The Perfect Horror Short for Our Times?
A waitress snaps after not being tipped and torments a rude customer.

Michael Kospiah’s short Honey Mustard opens with a moment everyone can relate to.  After receiving bad service at a restaurant, Frank stands up for himself and complains to a “smart-aleck” manager who obnoxiously chews gum the whole time.  

FRANK
It’s one of two things. Your waitress is either a
complete retard or she was trained by a complete retard.

Of course, Frank’s approach has much to be desired.  But, in principle, he’s not wrong.    

FRANK (CONT’D)
It says it comes with honey mustard, right? That’s what it says? I asked your idiot waitress for honey mustard five fucking times.

Frank isn’t likable, but he’s relatable.  

FRANK
Listen. I’ve had a very bad day.  All. I fucking wanted.
Was honey mustard with my God damn chicken fingers.

While Frank complains, his server Patricia is nowhere to be found.  Instead she’s on the phone in the bathroom, “mascara smeared from tears.” 

PATRICIA
I just wanna see my son.
(heartfelt)
I’m really, really trying. I’ve been working like crazy –

Patricia’s immediately likable, a true underdog, but she’s no saint.  She currently has no visitation rights to her son, because SHE’S behind on HER child support payments.  Also, by talking on the phone, she’s ignoring “her only table” and violating the diner’s no phones on the floor policy – something she’s been warned about before. 

And so the dance begins.  Throughout Honey Mustard, audience loyalty ping-pongs back and forth between Frank and Patricia.  When Frank doesn’t leave a tip -- pity for Patricia, hatred for Frank.  When Patricia pockets Frank’s ID with his home address -- fear of Patricia, concern for Frank. 

Frank and Patricia’s collision course climaxes at Frank’s cheap apartment later that night.  In bed, Frank watches the news.   

NEWS REPORTER
(from the TV)
…massacre at a local diner where five employees and
two customers were brutally gunned down.
One of the employees has been reported missing from the scene...

Then the doorbell rings. 

Michael Kospiah’s short Honey Mustard continuously defies expectation by constantly being two things at once.  It’s over-the-top but also restrained.  It’s kitschy but also deeply grounded in emotional reality.  At the end, your jaw will drop in shock, but the corners of your mouth will also turn up into a wicked smile. 

The Script

Honey Mustard

A waitress snaps after not being tipped and torments a rude customer.

About The Reviewer

B. S. Carter's picture
Real name: 

B. S. Carter began his writing career in second grade writing one-page (wide rule) sequels to movies like The Terminator, Ghostbusters, and City Heat (it’s a Clint Eastwood-Burt Reynolds buddy picture).

B. S. attended the University of South Carolina (the other USC) and graduated with a properly unemployable Liberal Arts degree in Media Arts.  While in college, B. S. won the Havilah Babcock Short Story Prize for his short story “Guts,” in which a high schooler tries to stop his best...Read more

About The Writer

Michael Kospiah's picture
Real name: 

Hey, what's up? 

I'm an award-winning screenwriter based out of New York City who specializes in darker subject matter and themes. My first produced feature film, "The Suicide Theory" won the Audience Award at the 2014 Austin Film Festival as well as the Grand Jury Prize (Best Picture) at the Dances With Films Festival in Hollywood. After a brief theatrical release and a three-year run on Netflix, "The Suicide Theory" is now available to watch on Amazon Prime, Itunes...Read more

The Nu You - Good as New?!?

The Nu You
How far would you go to be beautiful?

Cindy’s world is full of beautiful people. They flash beautiful smiles and wear beautiful clothes while driving beautiful cars. Cindy, with her unibrow, rudder nose, and wonky boob, is sure of one thing: she does not belong. But could she? If she’s willing to pay the price…?

The Nu You clinic offers Cindy the chance of a lifetime. They can grant Cindy’s cosmetic wish list with a complete assortment of corrective surgery. And the best part is that she can sleep through the entire recovery process, and awake from her ‘beauty nap’ reinvented as her best self.

But just how much will all this cost, and is beauty the only thing that Nu You is selling? Behind an unassuming office door lies a sinister secret. One that’s waiting for Cindy’s appointment day…

Think the cerebral parts of The Island (though trust me, this ain’t no Michael Bay pic!) with a hint of Gattaca, and a smart, snappy, satirical slant.

Our world today is chock-full of rake-thin models, celebrity worship, and harmful body-image trends. As a scathing critique of our modern celebrity obsession culture, it is destined to be a contemporary festival darling. Perfect for a director with an understanding and affiance for dark humor with social commentary.

So come in, have a seat. The Nu You awaits. Are you – and Cindy – ready to take that step?
 

About the Reviewer: Dane is an attorney based in Hamburg, Germany. He has over 10 years experience with film and film theory and once got to kick-in a door for the German equivalent of CSI. He is currently working on a full-length screenplay that he describes as “a music bio-flick with a kick”.

About The Reviewer

J.E. Clarke's picture
Real name: 

Known for her unique characters and plots, J.E. Clarke has optioned her feature length horror, "Containment" with Primestar Film Group (director Mike Elliott of Scorpion King 4 attached), her SF feature "Stream" with Purryburry Productions, John Noble of "Fringe" and "Lord of the Rings" attached.  Her fantasy/SF "Evergreen" (cowritten for Adam Zeulhke of Zenoscope Productions), is currently in preproduction, along with Entanglement...Read more

About The Writer

John Hunter's picture
Real name: 

Former Peace Corps volunteer, big ticket sales engineer, commercial graphic artist, packaging design consultant and recovering golfer. More recently, I’m an award winning and produced scriptwriter living under the shade of a large oak tree in Central Florida. Four of my shorts have been produced, my dystopian horror Baby Soup won the 2013 Florida Independent Filmmakers Contest and in July 2020, I declined an offer from mainland China for my creature feature...Read more

Shakespeare, Extra Cheese: Everything's Better With Pizza... Right?

Shakespeare, Extra Cheese
A young man’s life takes an unexpected turn after he encounters a naked woman performing Shakespeare.

The job of a pizza delivery driver is a pretty thankless task. They have to deal with the weather, tight deadlines, terrible pay, and then there’s the customers…

Young Bradley is one of these unfortunate drivers of our favourite fast food delight. On one initially mundane shift, he's confronted by a customer who doesn’t offer the normal abuse about timing, a bad tip, or simple rudeness. Instead, she gives him... nudity and the words of the Bard?!?

A moment later, the door opens and an attractive NAKED WOMAN (30) appears. But Bradley is busy pulling the pizza out of its insulated case and isn't looking at her as he speaks.

BRADLEY
How ya doin'? A large with pepperoni, onion and extra cheese.
That'll be nineteen eighty-sev...

Bradley looks up, pizza in hand. His jaw drops as he gets an eyeful.

NAKED WOMAN
(with real feeling)
Come, you spirits that tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here.
And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full of direst cruelty!
Make thick my blood; Stop up the access and passage to remorse,
that no compunctious visitings of nature shake my fell purpose,
nor keep peace between the effect and it! Come to my woman's breasts,
and take my milk for gall, you murdering ministers,
wherever in your sightless substances you wait on nature's mischief!
Come, thick night, And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell,
that my keen knife see not the wound it makes, nor heaven peep
through the blanket of the dark, to cry 'Hold, hold!'

A beat. The naked woman drops character. She reaches out and grasps the pizza box.

NAKED WOMAN
Lady Macbeth from Act One, Scene Five of Macbeth by William Shakespeare.

Bradley, frozen, relinquishes the pizza box as the naked woman smiles, steps back and closes the door. Bradley blankly stares at the closed door, his hand that held the pizza still extended.

Confusion reigns as the poor young man is left there on the doorstep, pizza gone and no money exchanged.

He returns to his work where his boss is furious, and clears up any doubt as to what should happen next. Returning for the money, Bradley's once again foiled by nudity and Shakespeare. Curse that confounded and devious bard!

As the comedy and chaos continue, the script slowly starts to turn - teasing the reader towards an unexpected - and exceptionally funny - end.

Shakespeare, Extra Cheese, is a witty short that keeps the reader guessing. Who is this strange woman? Why is she naked? And what on earth shall become of poor Bradley? If you're a film maker that likes funnies wrapped in eternal prose, this is one surreal skit that pays off!

The Script

Shakespeare, Extra Cheese

A young man's life takes an unexpected turn after he encounters a naked woman performing Shakespeare.

About The Reviewer

Cam Gray's picture
Real name: 

Surreal comedies are my release, but everyone else seems to like my dramas so I've put them up here for the sensible readers...

Recently graduated from the London Film School and I'm now attempting to get some of these wonderful pieces of work out there into the real world. If you're keen on any of them, or actually have comments and thoughts (they're genuinely always welcome), let me know.

Current masterpieces include a drama that stars a peacock and a single mother,...Read more

About The Writer

Garry Messick's picture
Real name: 

Garry Messick is a 2005 graduate of Palm Beach Film School. He has written and directed three short films: THE FLYER and GONE were selections of the Palm Beach International Film Festival in 2005 and 2006 respectively, and AN IMPERIAL MESSAGE was shown at the 2008 Action on Film Festival in Pasadena, Calif., where it earned an award nomination for Best New Director.

Garry’s feature-length script, A COLD RED KISS, topped the monthly best-rated screenplay list...Read more

Fun Size: Sometimes, Big *is* Better...

Fun Size
A trick-or-treater is angry after receiving a “fun size” candy bar.

Halloween may have been and gone for 2019, but everyone’s favourite costume themed day lives on in Jason K. Allen’s dark comedic short, Fun Size.

A doorbell rings and an innocent old man, Elmer McDaniel, greets a little “ghost” on his front door step. The usual Halloween pleasantries are exchanged, along with a few fun sized candy bars.

But the size of the sweets on offer quickly pose a sticky and not-so-sweet problem for the little ghost and our elderly friend.

KID
Trick-or-treat!

Elmer grins. He reaches inside and grabs his platter of candy. He takes a couple of tiny candy bars and drops them into the kid’s bag. The kid stares down into the bag.

KID
What was that?

ELMER
Candy bars. Fun size!

The kid nods knowingly. He turns toward the bushes.

KID
It’s him.

Two kids emerge from the bushes -- a witch and a goblin.

KID
You’re Elmer McDaniel, right? Inventor of fun size candy bars?

ELMER
Yep, that’s me! Fun size Elmer!

The three kids look at each other. They study Elmer.

KID
Tell me: What exactly is fun about miniature candy bars?
I fail to find the hilarity.

ELMER
I, uh... well...

KID
Did you get fun size candy bars when you were little?

ELMER
Well, no. We had... regular size.

KID
That’s what I thought.

With Elmer’s true identity revealed, and the now angry ghost joined by two of his costumed accomplices, the old man’s pleasant evening takes a turn for the worst. Will our geriatric friend survive the unhappy youths, or fall victim to their candy related, sugar fueled rage?

A short and witty script with minimal locations and budgetary requirements, Fun Size is just waiting for the right film maker to bring it to life. Halloween may indeed be no more for this year, but this is one "goulish" indie skit that would make the ideal project for someone looking for a seasonal release in 2020!

The Script

Fun Size

A trick-or-treater is angry after receiving a "fun size" candy bar.

About The Reviewer

Cam Gray's picture
Real name: 

Surreal comedies are my release, but everyone else seems to like my dramas so I've put them up here for the sensible readers...

Recently graduated from the London Film School and I'm now attempting to get some of these wonderful pieces of work out there into the real world. If you're keen on any of them, or actually have comments and thoughts (they're genuinely always welcome), let me know.

Current masterpieces include a drama that stars a peacock and a single mother,...Read more

About The Writer

Jason K. Allen's picture
Real name: 

Jason Allen is a writer and filmmaker from Nashville, TN. He is also a wilderness guide, nature photographer and award-winning journalist. His first produced screenplay was the 2009 feature comedy Lucky Fritz, starring Corey Feldman and Julia Dietze. Since then he's won Best Screenplay honors at the Nashville Film Festival, San Diego Film Awards, Mountain of Laughs Comedy Fest, TSA Screenwriting Awards, and Artlightenment Film Festival among others, and is a seven-time finalist of the...Read more

1-800: Reaching out to touch someone can have unexpected results...

One Eight Hundred
A desperate man comes across one too many misunderstandings when he phones a series of hotlines in search of a fix for his problems.

A drunken mess of a man stumbles down a foreboding dark alley towards a lone phone booth. He fails his first mission in not being able to put his loose change into the machine, but then regards the graffiti and stickers that cover the walls of his new surrounds, and finds a series of numbers to helplines that may or may not give the answer to whatever question it is he seeks.

The choice of helplines include those for drugs and alcohol, gambling and mental health, and our protagonist, the Caller, decides to call each of them for a quick chat.

The Caller picks up the phone and DIALS the first number. He hears the PHONE RINGING in the earpiece. A VOLUNTEER answers.

VOLUNTEER #1
Drug and alcohol hotline.

CALLER
Yeah, hello? I got an alcohol problem.

VOLUNTEER #1
Want to tell me about it?

CALLER
All the liquor stores are closed.

VOLUNTEER #1
It’s late. Are you alright, Sir?

CALLER
Yeah, I’m okay. So how does this work?
Can I pay you guys by credit card?

VOLUNTEER #1
There’s no charge for this service, Sir.

CALLER
You mean it’s free?

VOLUNTEER #1
Yes.

CALLER
Wow. Send me whatever you got, then.

VOLUNTEER #1
Pardon?

CALLER
Anything. Surprise me. I’m at the corner of, uh...
(looks around)
Broad Street and Wellington.

VOLUNTEER #1
This is a telephone help line, Sir.

CALLER
The telephone works fine.
That’s not what I need help with.

VOLUNTEER #1
You need help with your drinking...

CALLER
Yeah. How soon can you bring it?

VOLUNTEER #1
Sir, this isn’t a delivery service.
This is a hotline for people with alcohol problems.

CALLER
Yeah? Well right now, being out of booze after hours is my problem.

The Caller’s misunderstood pestering of each individual helpline is vexing for their volunteers, but in an unforeseen twist, our tragic central character may have met his match on the other end of the telephone, when he pesters the one volunteer group he really shouldn’t have.

From the imagination of author David Pauwels, One Eight Hundred is a wonderful little dark comedy that keeps the reader engaged, and is guaranteed to garner some laughs. With a simple setting and premise, it is also ideal for a film maker who is looking for a short that entertains.

The Script

One Eight Hundred

A desperate man comes across one too many misunderstandings when he phones a series of crisis hotlines in search of a fix for his problems.

About The Reviewer

Cam Gray's picture
Real name: 

Surreal comedies are my release, but everyone else seems to like my dramas so I've put them up here for the sensible readers...

Recently graduated from the London Film School and I'm now attempting to get some of these wonderful pieces of work out there into the real world. If you're keen on any of them, or actually have comments and thoughts (they're genuinely always welcome), let me know.

Current masterpieces include a drama that stars a peacock and a single mother,...Read more

About The Writer

David Pauwels's picture
Real name: 

Dave has written and optioned a number of shorts and features, as well as a novel, Who Iced The Snowman?, published by Cozy Cat Press in 2016.
His main genre is comedy, but he also leans towards sci-fi and paranoid/conspiratorial thrillers. He performs standup, plays bass, and cycles 300 km per week.Read more

Honey - Will it End Sweet?

HONEY 
When her plan to win the affections of her crush go awry,
a lovelorn teen finds an unexpected upside to her failure.

When not immersing herself in Riverdale fan fiction, slightly awkward 17-year-old Honey spends her time dreaming of would-be beau Eric, the fresh-faced boy next-door.

Tired of watching from afar, Honey concocts a plan involving a disguise and some minor dognapping of Eric’s pet pooch, Pepsi.  To the lovesick Honey, it’s the perfect strategy: return ‘found’ Pepsi, thus winning Eric’s heart and a date to the Snowflake Soiree.

Honey pulls some clothes out of her wardrobe. A scarf, a big jacket...

HONEY (V.O.)
No you don’t owe me anything.
Just happy to help.

She slips on a huge pair of sun glasses.

HONEY (V.O.)
No. Nobody’s asked me to the winter formal yet.

She wraps the scarf around her head, totally incognito. She gives herself a cheeky grin. Whatever plan she’s executing is foolproof to her in this moment.

HONEY (V.O.)
Really? You wanna go with me?
I guess it’s a date.

True to form, the slightly awkward Honey’s plan goes slightly awry and she’s left humiliated in front of Eric.  With her dreams of the Snowflake Soiree in tatters, Honey slinks home, where no amount of trash TV and comfort food can chase away the blues.

But the teenage mind is a maze of contradiction; and these two teens are about to learn they’ve more in common than sets them apart.

…And that sometimes, the worst plan is better than no plan at all.

Rhys Hicks’ Honey delivers an offbeat comic tale of teen anxiety and those first awkward steps on the road to love.  With a cast of three (plus minor small dog) and a simple suburban setting and interiors, Honey is well suited to filmmakers woking with a micro-budget.  A fun short script with snappy dialogue and a heartfelt message at its core.

The Script

Honey

An awkward teen's plan to win the affection of her crush attracts his attention for all the wrong reasons.

About The Reviewer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 

Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount of plaid and uses a calculator for the most basic of sums.Read more

About The Writer

Rhys Hicks's picture
Real name: 

Rhys Hicks is an Australian filmmaker and recent graduate of a Bachelor of Film Production. His strengths lie in writing,  cinematography, art direction, editing and motion graphics.

Rhys began writing and performing standup comedy at a young age and gradually his work evolved into writing comedic material for short films, feature films and teleplays. From there Rhys moved into producing his own content and fell in love with the craft of and many aspects of filmmaking.

Rhys' ...Read more

Packaging - It's What's Inside That Really Counts!

PACKAGING
A young couple’s stopover at an isolated mini-mart grows
more mysterious-and-dangerous-with each passing minute.

Yes, it’s that time of year again.  Halloween… Tis the season to indulge in all things spooky, scary, spine-tingling, and out of this world.

Cue one essential horror trope that I’m a big fan of: The road trip gone wrong. Oh, the perils of being on the open road, off the beaten track and far, far away from the safety of home. Flat tires, busted windscreens, an overheated engine? Those things are nothing compared to the terrors that can befall characters in horror movies.

Just look at the rather aptly titled: Wrong Turn; fill up the tank and stop off for a cuppa in The Vanishing, follow the mind bending puzzle of In Fear, hitch an ill-fated ride in Wolf Creek, or, if you dare, get out of the car and follow the trail of a demonic flesh eating creature to his lair in Jeepers Creepers.

Which leads us to: Taking a wrong turn, and the dreaded road trip pit-stop. Two things that should be avoided at all costs.

The characters in Packaging really should have heeded that advice and stayed in the car. But, a wayward GPS, the loss of cell-phone signal, and an ill-advised but much needed trip to the rest-room forces their hand. It’s a split-second decision that could lead to a detour to hell for one young man and his very pregnant wife.

Writer Rob Barkan knows how to craft horror so subtle it creeps up on you, and then shocks you when you realize exactly what you’re looking at. With an opening scene of deftly choreographed visuals and an unsettling sense of foreboding and fear, if you’re anything like me you’ll at first be not quite sure what you’re looking at or what you’re afraid of…

And then it’ll hit you. And you’ll just know, it ain’t going to end well.

We open on a close-up shot of a large spider spinning its web then segue seamlessly to a surreal scene in a parking lot:

A small, run-down  mini-mart tucked against the flank of a dark mountainside. Shreds of fog settle over gas pumps. A row of parked cars and SUVs line the storefront, lights on, engines (still) running.

In the distance … Headlights bathe the deserted highway. The purr of a Volvo’s engine as it pulls into the lot and parks next to the other vehicles.

Rob Barkan knows how to spin a yarn where nothing is as it first appears to be, where horror masquerades in the ordinary, where further inspection of the finer details reveals the true horrors that lie beneath - where two innocent characters are lured into a web of unsuspecting terror.

Filmmakers: Here’s your chance to take the right road, no detours along the way. Rob Barkan’s Packaging could be your big ticket out of town. Your ultimate destination: success.

 

The Script

Packaging

A young couple's stopover at an isolated mini-mart grows more mysterious--and dangerous--with each passing minute.

About The Reviewer

L. Chambers's picture
Real name: 

L.Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She currently works as a freelance web-content editor and lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia.Read more

About The Writer

Rob Barkan's picture
Real name: 

Rob has been writing horror, fantasy and science fiction since the age of seven. He has placed several short tales in small press and online magazines like Lovecraft's Weird Mysteries, Dark Planet and Strange Fire. A more extensive collection appeared on his award-winning Deathlife Gravesite. He has taken a deep plunge into screenplay writing for the past few years, totally enjoying mastering the art of visual writing. He recently scripted segments for a Hollywood director's horror anthology...Read more

Necessary Evil - But At What Cost?

Necessary Evil
A child must commit a terrible crime to keep an even greater atrocity from occurring.

If you had the opportunity to go back in time, where and when would you go, and who would you engage with? Would it be family? Would it be a person you’ve always wanted to meet? Someone you admire. Or, someone you detest? Would you do it to enrich yourself, or would you do it to commit a horrific act in the name of altruism?

Adam Rocke’s powerful short screenplay, ‘Necessary Evil’ contemplates the profound morality of going back in time to rid the world of a ubiquitous abomination before its inception. Or, think of it as the reverse of the ‘Terminator’… instead of killing off the savior of mankind (John Connor), they were terminating a pernicious person who would eventually poison the world with their hateful rhetoric.

No. Not that guy. The other guy.

The story starts with a young girl scoping out a school yard, where a set of similar-aged kids are milling around, playing marbles, smoking cigarettes… and speaking German. Clearly we’ve gone back in time.

The girl notices a young boy standing on his own near a fence. Seemingly a loner, disinterested in playing with others. She approaches the kid and entices him to play a game with her that involves going into the woods… away from the others.

GIRL
How come you’re not playing?

BOY
Games are stupid.

GIRL
Depends on the game.  I know one you’ll like.

BOY
Show me.

GIRL
Not here.  Come.

The kids go deeper into the woods before the girl stops and fetches something hidden under some foliage next to a tree. What happens next is both gruesome and fascinating.

Rocke’s script is not afraid to make big, bold decisions that will elicit discomfort from an audience. It will force them to ask questions of what they would do, if in a similar situation. Having a film (of any length) provoke contemplation from its viewers is something challenging to pull off as a writer. However, Rocke had achieved this rare accomplishment to great effect.

A nascent filmmaker seeking something small, yet provocative to cut their teeth on, couldn’t ask for more. A ‘Necessary Evil’ is a necessary must-consider from any up-and-coming director looking to make a splash at film festivals.

The Script

Necessary Evil

A child must commit a terrible crime to keep an even greater atrocity from occurring.

About The Reviewer

Jeremy Storey's picture
Real name: 

Jeremy Storey, originally hails from the United Kingdom, but now resides in Seattle, WA. He first discovered the joys of writing at school, penning short stories and collaborating on comic books with his friends. Coming from a writerly family, it was in his DNA to tell stories. However, it wasn’t until he graduated University, that he started to dabble in film and stage.

 

Since then, he’s written feature length screenplays (The Immaculate Secret, Rewind, Pink Slip Party, An...Read more

About The Writer

Adam Rocke's picture
Real name: 

Inspired by Hunter S. Thompson's "gonzo journalism," Adam's unusual skill set (firearms/weaponry expert, tactical/CQB training) combined with adrenaline junkie tendencies resulted in countless high octane articles for hip men’s lifestyle publications. Before long, when editors had a wild story idea that could get a journalist maimed or killed, Adam was the go-to scribe. Somehow he always came back alive and intact—with the story!

These participatory adventures resulted in...Read more

Double Booked - and Ready to Fire!

Double-Booked
Due to a scheduling error, two agency hit-men are double-booked to take out the same target.

Everyone knows the usual cinematic tropes of the Hollywood hitman with their charm, sophistication, ruthless edge and perfect timing. Well, author Charles Scowsill is here with his highly amusing comedy, Double Booked, to dispose of those conventions.

We open on a young man in a sharp suit, Winston, who carefully enters a house and prepares for what is to come. He takes a seat, relaxes, pulls out his gun and gets ready to conduct his messy business, but just as he is set to go he is interrupted by a rather bumbling and familiar nuisance, his aging colleague Thaddeus.

There is the soft sound of clutter. Winston raises his pistol calmly into the light. Suddenly - to the left of Winston, a window slides open. A clumsy figure staggers through.

Winston hurriedly leans over to a nearby “pixar” lamp and switches it on. The figure is revealed to be Thaddeus Eulovitch (57).

WINSTON
What the fuck are you doing here!?

THADDEUS
What the fuck are YOU doing here!?

WINSTON
Only gonna tell you once Thaddeus. FUCK OFF.

THADDEUS
What was that kiddo?

WINSTON
GET THE FUCK OUT OF HERE!

THADDEUS
Ah, so I did hear you right.
Haven't got my hearing aid in you see.

WINSTON
Back off Thaddeus this is my contract, you're past your time.

THADDEUS
I’ll give you five pounds to get and get some sweets from that off
license down the road.

WINSTON
Who the fuck do you think you are you withering asshole!?

Winston kicks over a nearby coffee table. The nonchalant Thaddeus takes a seat and lights a cigarette.

THADDEUS
Keep your diaper on. I guess the boffins at HQ screwed up our schedules.

WINSTON
FUCK!

As the two bicker, the plot thickens as the wife of their target, Georgia, stumbles across them, and proves to have deeper depths than either man was expecting.

Will Winston and Thaddeus figure out what to do, will the likely spanner in the works that is Georgia prove too much to handle, and will they finally manage to complete their job and remove the target? Download the script and give it a read to find out.

Aside from the comedic wit on show in the writing, Double Booked is only six pages long and largely set in one single internal location, making it a cheap and simple production. If you are a film maker looking for a comedy to get your name out there then look no further, download Charles Scowill’s work and let the hits fall where they may!

The Script

Double-Booked

Due to a scheduling error, two agency hit-men are double-booked to take out the same target...

About The Reviewer

Cam Gray's picture
Real name: 

Surreal comedies are my release, but everyone else seems to like my dramas so I've put them up here for the sensible readers...

Recently graduated from the London Film School and I'm now attempting to get some of these wonderful pieces of work out there into the real world. If you're keen on any of them, or actually have comments and thoughts (they're genuinely always welcome), let me know.

Current masterpieces include a drama that stars a peacock and a single mother,...Read more

About The Writer

Tristan Wexley's picture
Real name: 

I do my best to admire and study great writers, but not forget to be unique as one myself.

At present, I've got so much to learn and therefore not so much to share. So for the time being, I hope you enjoy my scripts, as I will enjoy yours. 

 

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