Shootin' The Shorts | Page 8 | Script Revolution

Shootin' The Shorts

Shootin' The Shorts is run by J.E. Clarke a longtime prolific screenwriter who loves to give others a little boost in the marketplace by highlighting why she believes their short script may stand out. She brings with her a loyal band of readers who share the same compassionate attitude who have joined her cause as it's grown and grown to connect writers with filmmakers on a monthly basis. Now it finds a home here on Script Revolution.

This is all about highlighting what makes a script great by focusing on the positives. You'll find no negative criticism or lists of issues here. Submitting a short script for consideration couldn't be easier, simply scroll down to the bottom of your script edit page and tick the "Submit to Shootin' The Shorts" checkbox. Please note; it takes time to get through all submissions, everything is subjective, and we're by no means saying these are the best short scripts on Script Revolution, they are simply the ones that have found an admirer within this section - CJ

Edie - You Get What You Pay For...

Edie
A male sex worker was up for anything… until he met Edie.

There’s probably always been a lot of sex had outside of romantic relationships.  But, over the past couple of decades much of the stigma attached to casual relationships and even hookups has faded.  The number of apps available to facilitate sexual encounters with strangers is an indication of their prevalence.  It’s therefore surprising that nearly half of all people who engage in casual sex, have said that they would like the sex to develop into a more serious relationship.

Darryl, the protagonist of Chris Courtney Martin’s Edie, is not one of those people.  A skilled and versatile sex worker, Darryl does it for money. 

The script opens with Darryl engaged in a graphic S & M encounter with John. Several minutes later, counting a wad of bills, and smoking a cigarette on the balcony of the rundown motel, Darryl notices Edie staring at him.  She’s a bit frumpy, but not bad-looking.  Darryl’s ready to get back to work. 

Within moments the two are inside Edie’s room.  She tells Darryl that it’s her birthday.  He offers her a birthday special.

EDIE
Two-fifty?

DARRYL
Yep. That's my Birthday Girl Special. You got that on you?

Edie nods.

EDIE
In the drawer.

Darryl crosses to the bedside table, opens the drawer.

A rainbow Velcro wallet sits inside. He picks it up, looks at Edie--

She nods, grants him permission.

He opens it up, takes out the bills, counts them. They add up to $250, even.

DARRYL
Well, well. Looks like this was meant to be.

Edie’s thoughts exactly. 

She seems so frightened and inexperienced that Darryl willingly lets her take the lead.  However, the confidence he has of his own control over the situation quickly fades.  By the morning after, Edie will have changed Darryl’s entire understanding of life (and death) for the worse.

If you appreciate scripts that turn the tables on the ones who think they have the upper hand, don’t pass up Edie.  She probably wouldn’t let you anyway.   

The Script

Edie

When a male escort takes a date with a lonely young woman, he uncovers a horrifying truth.

About The Reviewer

Julia Cottle's picture
Real name: 

Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing.Read more

About The Writer

Chris Courtney Martin's picture

I'm a writer. I'm a producer. I'm a thinker, dreamer, rebel. But most of all? I'm happy that the word-count minimum for these bios has been reduced. I would like to hope the work speaks for itself. I've been doing this for a long time and I've come to realize that at the end of the day, personal...Read more

Motion Sensor - Some Things are Best Left Unseen

Motion Sensor
An outdoor security light makes a homeowner feel suddenly less secure when it activates unexpectedly.

Motion sensors are like night lights… for adults. 

When plugged in (and working right), they enable us to see through dismal shadows. They ease every fear we harbor, regarding what prowls around under the cloak of night.

Including closets. Unlit bedrooms. And the backyard ‘round midnight.  But when a noise frightens us – is it always wise to uncover the source of that sound?

In Anthony Cawood’s “Motion Sensor,” we do find out. And greet an uninvited guest:  fear that grips us from beginning until bloody end.

Our story begins with tidy Bob heading into his dark kitchen – to place a cup in the sink.  But as our innocent hero will soon find out; simple acts of cleanliness sometimes lead to horrific mess:

The external light, outside bi-fold patio doors, pops on; flooding the kitchen in light.

Bob watches TIGGER, his ginger cat, pad across the patio.

BOB
Happy hunting.

The light clicks off...

Then on again.

No cat on the patio this time, it's empty, until...

A ginger shape streaks towards the window, hits with a dull THUD.

Tigger slides down the glass leaving a trail of blood and ginger gore.

BOB
What the...

He takes a step towards the glass doors.

The light clicks off again...

What horror do you think Bob will encounter next? Something that haunts you in your worst nightmares, waiting for night to come to life….

An evocative, easy shoot (except for Tigger’s “stunt”)Motion Sensor clocks in at two pages.  But even in that brief moment, it creates a lasting, fearful image that will forever haunt an audiences’ mind!

The Script

Motion Sensor

An outdoor security light makes this homeowner feel suddenly less secure when it starts to activate unexpectedly.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen short screenplays, three feature screenplays and two TV pilots. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood...Read more

About The Writer

Anthony Cawood's picture
Real name: 

Award-winning screenwriter with one feature produced and a further four features optioned or in pre-production. In addition to features, he has over forty short scripts produced/sold/optioned - including ten filmed. Also occasionally pens screenwriting articles, interviews with writers and...Read more

Snowbound - Through The Blizzard Clarity Is Found

Atmosphere, that's something I want to talk about here. It can be a hard task to deliver through words but Ra Inta turns that white expanse of page space into a snowy wilderness so vivid it will have you reaching for a coat. We open on a juxtaposed mixture of gritty wood chopping and a child (Charley) sledding, getting more and more reckless while protected by the guidance of his wise father (Bo).

We quickly learn that this is a father and son trapped in the conditions of their world with nothing but a cabin for comfort - a home that's absent of a mother.

CHARLEY
Dad, how much longer are we going 
to be here?

BO
Once it stops snowing, son. Once it 
stops. We’ll be all right.

Hope however quickly turns to horror as this supposed survival story twists into something more surreal. Bo and Charley run for it, fleeing their cabin as something ominous rumbles through their lives. They run to somewhere new. Somewhere forbidden. What they discover will surprise you just as much as them, and you'll probably "get it" just at the right moment.

This is a script which manages to build mystery and unfold it with a masterful pace, causing you to become increasingly fascinated with the explanation and meaning behind it all. I'm not going to spoil the surprise ending but that meaning is something we can all probably relate to right now. This is a clever commentary on our current political climate and, with that in mind, I encourage short filmmakers looking for something like this to act fast, strike while the iron is hot, and not be left out in the cold.

The Script

Snowbound

After escaping the snow, an idyllic childhood dramatically comes to an end -- in many ways.

About The Reviewer

CJ Walley's picture
Real name: 

I’m here for the gritty movies, the rebellious movies, the b-movies, and the hangout movies, those features that dare to be good old fashioned entertainment and pack a punch harder than their budgets would suggest.

I love pulp and exploitation, car chases and gunplay, but also depth and...Read more

About The Writer

Ra Inta's picture
Real name: 

Ra cut his cinematic teeth at the Roughcut Film School in his homeland of rural New Zealand.

He has written and directed five short films, but would like to strengthen his writing game. He likes to explore narratives that sneak scientific concepts in a consumable way (he holds a PhD in...Read more

Make You Believe - and you will!

Make You Believe
A loud-mouthed professional skeptic is shaken after a psychic channels his late grandmother…

Good ol’ grandma’s advice rarely disappoints. Which isn’t at all surprising. Hard won wisdom from decades of life is what helps many a wise nana predict what’s best for her grandchildren - in sensible, logical ways.

But heeding your nana isn’t always logical – especially after she’s passed on. Would a skeptic listen then?  Elvira Drake’s “Make You Believe” asks that very question, and tells the eerie tale.

As the script opens, Damien Caine – psychic debunker – guest stars on George Hope’s Late Night TV show; head to head with nationally acclaimed psychic Gladys.  Needless to say, their chemistry isn’t good.

The debate gets ever more heated as time goes on:

GEORGE
So, Gladys, how certain are you of the other side?
That you're actually in communication with spirits?

GLADYS
Oh, one hundred percent! No question.

DAMIEN
(chuckles nastily)
Aaaand that's the problem!

GEORGE
How do you mean?

DAMIEN
One hundred percent, no question?!
She's telling us she doesn't question anything! She's absolutely certain.
People like her are incredibly fraudulent and the people who believe her are gullible.

Gladys shakes her head and tries not to look too bothered.

GEORGE
I'm sure, as a world-famous psychic medium, you've heard this argument before.

GLADYS
Many, many times. All these skeptics are like broken records. Very unoriginal. Never anything new to --

DAMIEN
(getting worked up)
We have to keep repeating ourselves because you people never give us a satisfying response.

GLADYS
I could capture a genie in a mason jar and it wouldn't be enough for you.
Skeptics are merely debunkers. It's like a cult.

DAMIEN
Well, genies aren't real, so...

GEORGE
(to Damien)
I think what she's saying is, no matter what evidence she presents to you,
you'll refuse to seriously consider it.

Let’s face it: in certain ways, Gladys is – shall we say – “dead on”?  Damien’s unlikely to consider new conclusions. But when Gladys channels his dear beloved – and departed – grandmother… will this hardened debunker see the light?

Perhaps (in a twisted way.)  We’d never want to ruin the surprise – so read the rest yourself and find out!

A stand-out satire short, "Make You Believe" gives readers and audiences a glimpse of both sides of the afterlife coin - concluding with a dark comedic turn that's sure to make believers out of us all!

 

 

The Script

Make You Believe

A loud-mouthed professional skeptic is shaken after a psychic channels his late grandmother who gives him a warning, which he doesn't heed, much to his detriment.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen short screenplays, three feature screenplays and two TV pilots. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood...Read more

About The Writer

Elvira Drake's picture
Real name: 

Please do not ask me for a copy of my scripts.

I'm currently rethinking my screenwriting pursuits.

Note: The scripts are still under copyright, if you've got a copy.Read more

Satnav - Where Might It Take You Next?

 SATNAV
 A woman’s infidelity takes her on an unexpected journey.

Hell Hath No Fury Like A Woman Scorned is how the old adage goes, but the latest research indicates men may in fact be sorer losers when it comes to love and war. Add twenty-first century technology into the mix as the latest weapon of revenge and things can get very dicey indeed.

In Anthony Cawood’s one-page thriller, Satnav, we open on 30-something, Sarah, driving along a deserted patch of road alone and late at night. Sarah’s just punched her location and presumably her destination into a high-tech device some of us like to call a Satnav - otherwise known as a GPS, or navigation assistant.

The question is: will she reach her destination?

She’s just received a text message from her husband, David, and he’s not happy.  Certain revelations regarding Sarah’s extra-curricular behaviour have come to light and it appears she has not been the model of a loving and faithful partner. As the text messages continue to come thick and fast and the Satnav guides Sarah on her journey we wonder will she make it to where she wants to go in one piece?

It’s no easy task to build suspense and create a fully fledged story in one-page but Anthony Cawood negotiates the twists and turns with skill and expertise in this tight micro-short thriller that’ll resonate and pack a punch with audiences.

Filmmakers: We know you have the drive and you’re dying to move off the starting blocks. All you need now is the vehicle. And here it is! Cut and polish in your own inimitable style and Satnav could be your short-cut to guaranteed success.

The Script

SatNav

A woman's infidelity takes her on an unexpected journey when her scorned husband hacks her car's navigation system.

About The Reviewer

L. Chambers's picture
Real name: 

L.Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She currently...Read more

About The Writer

Anthony Cawood's picture
Real name: 

Award-winning screenwriter with one feature produced and a further four features optioned or in pre-production. In addition to features, he has over forty short scripts produced/sold/optioned - including ten filmed. Also occasionally pens screenwriting articles, interviews with writers and...Read more

The Tooth Fairy: ...Smile!!!

THE TOOTH FAIRY
An enthusiastic young girl is about to learn the Tooth Fairy always exacts a price.

Childhood can be a magical time. Santa Clause and The Easter Bunny are the obvious standouts, but that special little nocturnal sprite we know as The Tooth Fairy, must also be given honourable mention.

Tinsel, fairy-dust, and chocolate eggs aside, it’s just a little bit creepy when you consider all three of these magical creatures come at night while we are sleeping.

Tradition has it when you lose your milk teeth as a child you should place the tooth  under your pillow just before you nod off to sleep. In the morning, if you’re lucky, and if you’ve been a good little girl or boy, you will wake to discover a delightful gift, usually one of the monetary kind - a small token symbolizing the beginning of your rite of passage from childhood into adulthood, courtesy of The Tooth Fairy.

Throughout history Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny are depicted in pretty consistent good-guy fashion. The Tooth Fairy however can appear in many different guises – as male, female, with wings or wand, as pixie, dragon, ballerina, bat or rat, and commonly mouse – even, (according to Wiki,) as a ‘potbellied flying man smoking a cigar’! Huh?

Now, that’s really creepy.

Not nearly as creepy and macabre however, as the depiction of the titular character in James Barron’s one-page horror thriller – The Tooth Fairy.

One-page scripts are no easy task for writers but James Barron manages to skilfully weave a fully rounded tale with a shocking twist all in one page.

We open on Minka Avery, an excitable six year old girl (with a gap-toothed smile) waving a twenty-dollar note in front of her parent’s faces.

Look what the Tooth Fairy left! She exclaims.

The astonished looks on both parent’s faces tell us neither one of them left such a gift.

They stare at each other a moment, confused.

So what’s going on here? Where did this little windfall come from?

And why are Dad’s new pliers missing?

Filmmakers, are you looking for a micro-short in the horror genre with a denouement that will make your audience’s toes curl?  Perhaps an entry for Shriekfest or Screamfest or one of the many other horror festivals going around? Well, look no further than James Barron’s, ‘The Tooth Fairy’. This is one tale you can definitely sink your teeth into.

The Script

The Tooth Fairy

An enthusiastic young girl is about to learn the Tooth Fairy always exacts a price.

About The Reviewer

L. Chambers's picture
Real name: 

L.Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She currently...Read more

About The Writer

James Barron's picture
Real name: 

I love to write comedy along with the occasional horror/thriller. My work is frequently showcased on Janet's Shootin' The Shorts Blog (which is now part of Script Revolution too!) Feel free to check out more on my website: http://www.jbarronscripts.com...Read more

Go Fish - It Ain't No Game (Or is it?)

GO FISH
Two ten year old boys spend the evening in the family hunting cabin, playing cards and drinking beer.
It seems like fun until the reality of the day catches up with them.

When President Franklin Delano Roosevelt once famously stated: ‘The only thing we have to fear, is fear itself’, it applied to a time when the world was on the verge of being fully engulfed in the flames of conflict. It was about reminding people that if they can stay calm and manage their fear, that they will overcome the horrors of war.

But if you were to apply this quote to a horror film or monster movie, it takes on a different meaning; it becomes a fascinating anachronism when embodied by the central protagonists and how they cope with fear itself.

It’s night. It’s the 1930s. Meet Henry and Samuel, two 10-year old boys, camping out in a remote hunting cabin. Both are covered in blood and mud while surrounded by creepy stuffed animal trophies ghoulishly adorning the walls of the cabin. It’s unclear why they are there and why they’re in such a bedraggled state. But one thing is clear… they enjoy playing GO FISH, and love it even more, when the winning player gets a turn at sipping from a large bottle of beer.

Henry throws his cards back on the table and grumps.

HENRY
Five.

Samuel gathers the cards then picks up the bottle.

HENRY
Can I have a little?
 (beat)
Since I ain’t had any yet?

SAMUEL
You won yet?

HENRY
No.

Samuel eyes Henry as he takes a large mouthful.                 

Such is the way with young boys. Sometime all that matters to them is winning the game, and earning the right to brag… or drink the beer! But sometimes the game itself is a distraction.. From what or why isn’t directly addressed at first.

That in many ways is the beauty of Go Fish. You can feel an undercurrent of eeriness in the first few pages. It makes you feel unsettled, as you know there’s more to this picture than meets the eye.

Sure enough, the truth reveals itself with a sudden ferocity that comes and goes with the snap of a finger – or, would that be a claw?!? Suddenly you realize why the boys are bloodied and covered in muck, as they’ve been fighting off things that go bump in the night.

The brilliance of this script is in telling this story from the perspective of the boys. On the surface, they treat the horror no differently than one would cope with a pet gone rabid. They do not fear for the sake of fear itself, but as most inexperienced kids do, they just get on with things. Distract themselves with the fun of games, joshing each other, yappin’ about girls, and of course the glory of beer.

Kirsten James’ Go Fish is a truly unique and innovative story that blends the scariness of monster movies with how children cope with trauma - in a way that will leave you satisfied and really wanting to see more of this world she’s fashioned into narrative.

For filmmakers out there seeking to make a movie that oozes atmospheric potential, and also allows them to creatively explore a new and original take of a familiar genre, then look no further.

GO FISH and you’ll be pleasantly surprised by what you catch!

The Script

Go Fish

It's the 1930s, two ten year old boys spend the evening in the family hunting cabin, playing cards and drinking beer. It seems like fun until the reality of the day catches up with them.

About The Reviewer

Jeremy Storey's picture
Real name: 

Jeremy Storey, originally hails from the United Kingdom, but now resides in Seattle, WA. He first discovered the joys of writing at school, penning short stories and collaborating on comic books with his friends. Coming from a writerly family, it was clearly in his DNA to tell stories. However,...Read more

About The Writer

Kirsten James's picture
Real name: 

Kirsten is an aspiring screenwriter in her mid 40’s, originally from NZ, living in the USA. She started writing short stories 5 years ago, and after a year learned that she was more geared to writing scripts. Kirsten has a degree in psychology and finds this a great asset to her writing.

...Read more

Dads - Family's More Than Flesh and Blood

Dads
An altruistic elderly gentleman tries to save a young prostitute from life on the street.

A subtle noir vibe permeates Canadian-based Ralph Shorter's screenplay, Dads. A duet character study imbedded in a gritty atmosphere – the kind that makes its presence known from line one:

It's dusk in the city as silver-haired, 50-year-old Dave sits in a diner  - steaming cup of joe in wrinkled hands. That’s when he spots young and "strikingly beautiful" Randy through the window; she’s ambling down the sidewalk in full stride. Dressed in "a rabbit skin coat...thigh-high stiletto buccaneer boots (and) a black micro-skirt," Randy effortlessly catches Dave’s eye.

Intrigued, Dave watches Randy skip through a Hop-Scotch game on the sidewalk, check her makeup, and flip off teenage boys as they cat-call from a passing car.

Fortunately, Dave’s not that type. Instead, he waves Randy inside.

Before one can even wolf-whistle, Randy enters the diner and takes a seat next to Dave.

RANDY
I'm Miranda, but I prefer Randy.
If I'm the floor show, the least you can do is buy me coffee.

She proffers her hand. Dave shakes it… like the gentleman he appears to be.

DAVE
Dave. Worth the price of admission.

But their getting-acquainted banter quickly devolves into business – and takes an even darker turn.

RANDY
Like little girls, Dave? Looking for a real good time?

DAVE
Whoa, you've got me all wrong. I'm a married man.

Feeling disappointed and cheated out of a deal, Randy thanks Dave for the coffee – but flees outside.

Leaving behind a burning question: what precisely does Dave want? Will the two ever cross paths again? Or are Dave and Randy ships destined to pass in the night?

In true noir fashion, Randy's more than just a hooker with a troubled past. Depending on his motives, can Dave find a path to heal her damaged soul?

A thick mix of memorable characters and hard nosed dialogue, Dads paints a not-so-rosy portrait of less than picture perfect lives. If you're a filmmaker who loves dramatic characterization – colored with the soot of noir - Dads is a cinematic slice of life you should snatch off the streets and save yourself!

 

 

The Script

Dads

An altruistic, elderly gentleman tries to save a young prostitute from life on the street.

About The Reviewer

KP Mackie's picture
Real name: 

Über reader. I enjoy writing animated scripts, historical-fiction and westerns, when I'm not reading or researching new story ideas. So many ideas, so little time...

Script Revolution is a great place to interact with old friends and make new friends. It's all about networking!  ;D  ...Read more

About The Writer

Ralph Shorter's picture
Real name: 

.

Ralph Douglas Shorter ~ Screenwriter Resumé

About the Screenwriter:

I was recently picked up to write for "Binge Bros. Productions" after they perused a writing sample I submitted. So far, I've handed in one action/comedy...Read more

A Visual Rebirth: Sentient

Life, death, and mermaids.

GAVIN, a man of no definite age, lies alone, bobbing gently on the water.

Gavin sleeps in a dinghy on the open sea, drifting along blissfully unaware of what's to come. A mermaid appears startling him awake.

Gavin
Am I dreaming?

Enveloped as he is in the mystery of his circumstance, we have no choice but to continue - if only for ourselves.

Gavin
But where am I?

Mermaid
On the edge.

The dialogue well-crafted and precise; Gavin asks all the right questions to reveal his destiny.

He begins to pant fast, holding his chest. She smiles.

Starkly revealing, this script showcases amazing prowess in its ability to tap into the power of visual storytelling. Clocking in at a mere two pages, it manages to paint a vivid and engrossing tale that will stick with the reader far beyond the time it takes to read it.

The light is larger now, much closer. The mermaid offers her hand.

Tina manages to tap into a collective subconscious giving little in the way of direct explanation. Her unique take on fantasy furthers the spectacle and absolutely grips the audience from the very beginning until its remarkable end.

His shoulders sink below the waves. He screams, before his head disappears under the water.

The ubiquity of its story and depth of subject matter lends itself to success. Considering the eminence of The Shape of Water, I can see it performing spectacularly on a festival circuit. Filmmakers take note, with practical effects taking precedence, this film will be a joy to make.

Sentient is a visual treat and fantastical tour de force.

The Script

Sentient

A man awakes on a dinghy, and questions his awareness, when a mermaid appears.

About The Reviewer

Matthew Portman's picture
Real name: 

Films:

  • FLIGHT - Written for a week-long student movie competition.

Accolades:

About The Writer

Tina Balli's picture
Real name: 

Studied at LCCA, creative media, where I wrote 'Spotted Dick, the Musical,' a comedy short, in song! Check it on my YouTube channel, LEMONADE BUDGET, where I also have crafty tutorials.. . I attended a script course with 'Raindance', many years ago...Yes, I''m no spring chicken. . I self...Read more

Undying Love Triangle - Somethings *Never* Change....

Undying Love Triangle
A vampire love triangle gone bad.  Things are about to get real bloody.

It’s a pretty common story.  A married man cheats on his spouse with another woman.  The woman wants the man to leave his wife.  The man promises to do so.  But, the man doesn’t leave his wife. His lover waits.  

Weeks, months or years pass by and man still doesn’t leave his wife.  Finally, the woman ends the relationship.  Or, waits some more.   

Or…decides to kill the wife.

If the three are all vampires, that murder option seems pretty likely.  And, Darren Seeley’s Undying Love Triangle shows just how complicated infidelity can become when all of the characters are out for blood.

When Teresa gets to the point of having had enough of being the other woman, she decides it’s time to eliminate Austin’s wife, Beth.  Trying to appease her, Austin suggest to Teresa that they should just tell Beth.  At least then, the two lovers would not have to sneak around any longer.  

When the two lovers arrive at Austin’s home, Beth has just returned from her job at the hospital.  Her job is tedious, but has its perks--tonight she’s been able to sneak out an icebox full of type AB.   

The overhead florescent light flickers.

BETH
Work, dumb bastard.

The white glow from above stabilizes.

An empty juice container, a piece of masking tape, over the label. On the tape: a marker scribble:

AB -

Beth turns on the sink faucet, plugs the drain. She unscrews the lid on the container. Slips on a pair of dish-washing gloves.

A pair of scissors cuts a small corner of a blood bag.

Beth greets her husband when he enters the kitchen behind her, but quickly realizes that he is not alone.

What ensues is a delightfully messy end to the vampires’ –and the audience’s—understandings about loving relationships.

If you’re ready for a novel take on marital commitment, seek vicarious thrills by watching others’ struggles with trust issues, or just like bloody endings, you won’t want to miss Undying Love Triangle. 

The Script

Undying Love Triangle

When two vampires have an affair, a murder plot unfolds. But the over-the-hill wife isn't that easy to kill.

About The Reviewer

Julia Cottle's picture
Real name: 

Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing.Read more

About The Writer

Darren Seeley's picture
Real name: 

I have written several full length and short spec screenplays, which have gone through peer reviews at Zoetrope  Talentville and Simply Scripts. 

Attended the Austin Film Festival and Heart Of Screenwriter's conference in 2001 and 2002. 

I occasionally volunteer to help out the...Read more

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