Shootin' The Shorts | Page 10 | Script Revolution

Shootin' The Shorts

Shootin' The Shorts is run by J.E. Clarke a longtime prolific screenwriter who loves to give others a little boost in the marketplace by highlighting why she believes their short script may stand out. She brings with her a loyal band of readers who share the same compassionate attitude who have joined her cause as it's grown and grown to connect writers with filmmakers on a monthly basis. Now it finds a home here on Script Revolution.

This is all about highlighting what makes a script great by focusing on the positives. You'll find no negative criticism or lists of issues here. Submitting a short script for consideration couldn't be easier, simply scroll down to the bottom of your script edit page and tick the "Submit to Shootin' The Shorts" checkbox. Please note; it takes time to get through all submissions, everything is subjective, and we're by no means saying these are the best short scripts on Script Revolution, they are simply the ones that have found an admirer within this section - CJ

Frequency: Things... Change

Frequency
Working alone in his mother's basement,
a young techie makes a scientific breakthrough which may cost him his life.

Meet young, unassuming Richard, and his brave, intrepid lab rat, George. Richard is working on a scientific experiment, that could literally change the world as we know it. All from the convenient confines of his ever-exacerbated mother’s basement.

FREQUENCY, written by John Hunter is a tasty nugget of sci-fi fun that takes a familiar trope – nerdy young adult living in their basement, while always the focus of their mother’s frustrated ire – and turns it on it’s head, in a most ingenious way. FREQUENCY asks the question… what if the nerdy young adult suffering from arrested development, really is changing the world from their mother’s basement? And all they want is time and patience to realize their dreams and make their mother proud:

RICHARD
George, I think I’ve finally got this figured out.
Different dimensions in time are separated like
stations on a radio. Just change the frequency 
and BLAM – a different reality. Won’t my mom be proud.

But before he can do that, he most overcome one of life’s biggest hurdles first… being on time for dinner:

RICHARD’S MOM (V.O)
Dinner’s ready.

Interrupted in the middle of a scientific breakthrough, RICHARD snaps.

RICHARD
Just give me a few more minutes…

RICHARD’S MOM (V.O)
Dinner is ready, and I mean NOW!

As with most tales that involve the space time continuum, there’s the omnipresent threat of causation. FREQUENCY delivers on this concern in a most unexpected and clever way, that will leave the audience for this film with eyes wide open and mouth agape.

Will Richard make the scientific breakthrough of the century? Will George go down as the most important lab rat in history? Will they survive his mother’s veggie meatloaf? All of these weighty questions are asked and answered in this little gem of screenplay – perfect for the first-time filmmaker looking to flex their creative muscle on a limited budget.

Don’t waste any more time. Tune into FREQUENCY – you won’t be disappointed.

About The Reviewer

Jeremy Storey's picture
Real name: 

Jeremy Storey, originally hails from the United Kingdom, but now resides in Seattle, WA. He first discovered the joys of writing at school, penning short stories and collaborating on comic books with his friends. Coming from a writerly family, it was clearly in his DNA to tell stories. However,...Read more

About The Writer

John Hunter's picture
Real name: 

A curious nature has led me down many paths: former Peace Corps volunteer, big ticket sales engineer, commercial graphic artist, packaging design consultant, recovering golfer and more recently, an award winning and produced scriptwriter. 

My voice is character driven, slightly dark and...Read more

Y2K - How Does the World End... For You?

Y2K
A man is convinced that the New Year will bring an end to life as we know it. 
And, he refuses to be disappointed.

There’s no denying that the dawn of the millennial brought with it a number of glitches.  There were academic calendars that added years of classes to the current semester, Medicare checks that weren’t paid on time, ATM cards that no longer worked, library systems that added decades of fines for overdue books and some people’s work calendars indicated that they were no longer employed as it was years past their retirement date.  Doomsday fanatics’ pride may have suffered, but humanity survived.

But, if things don’t go the way it’s expected on the Armageddon calendar, one can always take things into one’s own hands.  Like Bert.  Bert is the protagonist of Y2K.   He has a plan.  And, a backup plan. 

The plan looks pretty much like any ordinary survivalist’s plan.  Stock up on food.  Canned food.

INT. GROCERY STORE - DAY

Bert picks up a can of tuna, reads the label, places it in his shopping cart.
He swipes the rest of the tuna from the shelf with his arm into the cart.

Check.  Stock up on water. 

INT. STATION WAGON - DAY

The hatch opens, Bert stands outside, loads bags upon bags of groceries into the car.
Bert pushes the cart away, then reappears with a cart full of gallon jugs of water.

Check.  Buy lumber to board up the windows. 

INT. STATION WAGON - LATER

Bert opens the hatch, tosses lumber and 2x4s into the car.
He slams the hatch closed.

Check!

The woman in the basement? That’s his hostage.  A pretty woman whose face adorns a collection can in the neighborhood restaurant where Bert just ate breakfast. 

Bert feeds her.  And, then inspects his gun to makes sure that it is loaded. If nothing happens at midnight other than the Times Square New Year’s Ball landing at One Times Square, Bert is prepared.  

Audiences will love the pace of this script that shifts gracefully from the tempo of a day-in-a-life story to a surprise-of -your-life twist in the course of six pages.   Don’t wait until the expiration date of your canned goods to check out this apocalyptic tale!

The Script

Y2K

A survivalist must decide what to do when the world doesn't end.

About The Reviewer

Julia Cottle's picture
Real name: 

Julia Cottle is a cultural anthropologist living in Chicago. She has worked for years as a university instructor and researcher for organizations committed to social justice. She always has loved to write, but only recently has discovered the joy of film and stage writing.Read more

About The Writer

David Troop's picture
Real name: 

Dave Troop began writing as soon as he could hold a No. 2 pencil. In 2012, he discovered the beauty and the challenge of the five page screenplay while writing short scripts for MoviePoet.com and Simplyscripts. Dave continues to write and review short scripts for Script Revolution and Shootin'...Read more

Playoff Tickets - Some Things Aren't A Game....

Playoff Tickets
Two friends late for a playoff game hit a stray.
What happens next brings a whole new meaning to the phrase “Dog Day Afternoon”.

BFF Mike and Chris are lucky guys, so it seems. Today, they’ve hit the jackpot: playoff tickets to the Big Game. All they need do is hop in the car, and speed across town to waiting seats.

As Chris Hick’s Playoff Tickets opens, traffic’s already jumped in the way.  Despite being designated driver, Chris fidgets with his phone – intent on finding a faster route.

But cell phones and cars should never mix. The inevitable occurs: THUMP. And YELP.

A glance in the rear view mirror quickly identifies the source. Chris has run over a poor (and now quite dead) dog. Believe it or not, that’s where the fun begins.

Not due to the dog – of course - but the chaos that ensues.  What to do for the poor little fella? In a panic, Mike and Chris brainstorm. Dark humor quickly runs amok:

CHRIS
We could leave a note.

MIKE
Leave a note?

CHRIS
Yes.

Beat.

MIKE
Leave a note, on a dead dog in the middle of the street?

CHRIS
Do you have a better idea?

Several ideas fail to pass inspection, car or not. But inspiration finally hits:
Sling the dead dog into oncoming traffic, and blame its fate on someone else.

CHRIS
Okay, I'll pick it up and hide behind the bush here.
When the next car comes, I'll throw it in front of them as they drive by.
They'll think they hit it and will have to tell the owners.

MIKE
This is awful.

CHRIS
Please rise for our national anthem!

MIKE
Alright! Alright! Let's do this.

What happens next? Don’t ask.  Best to find that out for yourself: along with lots of taboo, funny stuff.
Make no mistake: dark humor inherently feeds off painful topics. But the best of such genres cut both ways. 

Playoff Ticket’s twisted tale forces readers (and audiences) to think on a moral level while simultaneously stifling a laugh. If something this horrible happened to you, what path would you take?

So crack open Playoff Tickets and Pandora’s Box. If you’re looking for a funny, thought provoking and budget friendly short – this could be your season pass to a home run!!

 

The Script

Playoff Tickets

Two friends late for a playoff game hit a dog on the way to the stadium.

About The Reviewer

Shawn Davis's picture
Real name: 

Shawn began writing in 2008 as a means to overcome a lifelong reading disorder. After several short scripts, he took on writing his first feature screenplay in 2009. Six years and several screenplays later, Shawn's highly acclaimed script Equal Retribution was reviewed and given...Read more

About The Writer

Chris Hicks's picture
Real name: 

The bio section. I never know if this should be treated like an origin story or something that could be converted into an obituary by changing the tense of the verbs. Perhaps a blend of the two is the best approach to take. I should include some details about myself. I’m Chris, aka the Chris in...Read more

22 Miles From Trenton - Farther Than One Might Think!

22 Miles to Trenton
Penny races to Grover’s Mill to save her sister from impending doom.

Where were you when Kennedy got shot?
Where were you on September 11th, 2001?
Where were you when the Berlin Wall came down?

If you were sentient enough at the time, you can answer these questions instantly.

But did you know that to many Americans, it once seemed like October 30th, 1938 would become an unforgettable date?

Take Penny Connors, for example: the 15-year-old comic book and sci-fi loving protagonist of 22 Miles from Trenton.

A small town New Jersey girl with an adventurous imagination, she’s nothing more than a weird loner according to Veronica, her older (and more socially “normal”) sister.

But there’s no time for these two siblings to trade insults; Veronica’s got a party in Grover’s Mill to attend!

Home alone in 1938, there’s nothing for Penny to do but listen to the radio. Yet – what she hears on the live news this fateful night wouldn’t sound out of place in one of her comic books.

A strange object’s fallen to Earth. Unknown entities are emerging from its shell. And the location of this alien phenomenon is…

PENNY
(to herself)
Grover’s Mill…

Terrified but determined, Penny grabs her bicycle and sets off on a rescue mission to save her sister, meeting fellow adventurers along the way.

While all of them are determined to discover the truth, the truth is also determined to hide itself from them; until they’re up against … possibly the most monumental event humanity has ever faced!

Will Penny rescue her sister? Will this experience bring the siblings closer together? Or will Penny and Veronica be torn apart…permanently? Or literally?

Partially based off true events, Trenton is a thrilling and well-paced script that offers outer space sized creativity to a director and their team in terms of shots and style.

Combine this with a simple and inspiring message, and you’ve got yourself a sure-fire winner. One that – like what happened at Grover’s Mill for reals – will truly stand the test of time!

 

The Script

22 Miles From Trenton

A young girl sets out to save her older sister from the threat of alien invasion in Grover's Mill, NJ.

About The Reviewer

Hamish Porter's picture
Real name: 

That guy who does a load of STS reviews and writes when he's not working or reading superfluous interesting articles. My filmmakers Rushmore is Nolan, Kubrick, Hitchcock, and Eastwood. Psychological thrillers, crime, and dramas are my thing, but I'm impartial to anything that's...Read more

About The Writer

Michael Field's picture
Real name: 

My Why

I grew up loving the cinema. I still do. That love spurned me towards storytelling. At first, I started out as an actor and soon realized, while I enjoy it, I prefer creating the story and not just being part of it and I've been telling stories for over 20 years....Read more

It's Ants All the Way Down.

If you once empathized with ANTZ, get ready to eat your socks.

Skin Deep
She puts on her best collagen pout, wiping steam off the mirror and admiring her appearance.

Enter Shay, whose vanity drives a vision of shallow perfection unmatched even by her basically-a-model boyfriend Travis. After he leaves for a business trip, Shay meets her match in an anthill precariously poised to disturb Yoga time.

Shay
(disgusted)
Oh my God...

With a long-developed fear of ants, I can safely say my dear reader, that I agree; it’s all down the anthill from here. An unfortunate call to Hugs Not Bugs pest control later, Shay is forced to take matters into her own hands. What follows is a ride through a Cronenberg-esque showdown. Woman vs. Nature and a whole load of pain concealer can’t quite fix.

One eye pops open, the paranoid iris darting towards the hill.

With killer imagery and scenes that absolutely shiver-your-timbers, Megan provides an excellent vision-scape to explore.

It looks around, its mandibles opening and closing.

Furthermore, filmmakers interested in utilizing CG should take note. A bit of ant-imation here and there and this story will absolutely pop on the big screen.

The floor is a writhing mass of ants.

Pair that with delicious irony, narcissism, and a study in extreme dermatology and you’ve got yourself a joy-ride of a short film.

Skin Deep explodes with grotesquerie and all your worst ant-based fears. Fans of horror should definitely give it a read. After a few sleepless nights and shivering nightmares, you’ll thank Megan… and your local pest control.

 

 

The Script

Skin Deep

A vain, superficial woman gets more than she bargained for when she destroys an ant hill in her backyard.

About The Reviewer

Matthew Portman's picture
Real name: 

Films:

  • FLIGHT - After a tough break-up, a hard-working academic finds comfort away in a budding relationship.
     
  • ...Read more

About The Writer

Meg Turner's picture
Real name: 

Meg is an experienced Vancouver-based screenwriter who has demonstrated their skills in screenwriting, short stories, storytelling, script analysis, and proofreading. They are a walking encyclopedia of film trivia and avid gamer who hopes their passions will meld into one cohesive writing career...Read more

Cold Smoke - Where There's Smoke....

COLD SMOKE
Powder skiing and the lure of cold smoke is an irresistible temptation. It pays to listen to the professionals.

How about something a little different for the new year?  

For most, the thought of breaking trail up a snowbound mountainside only to slide back down again is one seldom dwelled upon. 

But for a dedicated few, winter in the mountains is the sweet soul-food of life itself; and every storm pure mana from Ullr.

John Staats’ Cold Smoke embraces not only those few but does so with a virtual reality script.  It’s a little different to what some may be used to; yet the simple storyline and crisp writing leave no doubt as to the writer’s intent. 

We join a trio of ski patrollers on a dawn mission for fresh tracks.  Rookie patroller, Brownie, leads the way, breaking trail under the watchful gaze of veterans Squat and Buckster.  A breathless hike later and they’re staring into Hidden Canyon and two feet of pristine powder.

Brownie, with his youthful energy and cocksure approach, thinks he’s got it all figured out.  But the others are soon to warn him to the finer points of mountain safety.  Beneath the surface lurks a greater danger; one that no amount of experience or caution can ever fully predict.

Yet for Brownie, like countless others before him, the temptation proves too great.  With the call of cold smoke ringing in his soul   their words are quickly forgotten and Brownie soon discovers that one wrong turn can (literally) bring down a whole mountain of trouble.  Will Brownie live to see Taco Tuesday?  Or did the rookie just call last run?

Cold Smoke is a great short script for an experienced filmmaker looking to try their hand at a new technique, or even a public body looking for an entertaining and informative way to educate the next generation of skiers and snowboarders in backcountry travel.  Cold Smoke puts you right there on the mountain with fun characters and an insight that could make for an exciting and practical piece of film making.

The Script

Cold Smoke - VR

Powder skiing and the lure of cold smoke is an irresistible temptation. It pays to listen to the professionals.

About The Reviewer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 

Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount...Read more

About The Writer

John Staats's picture
Real name: 

I'm proud of the work posted here and the stories you're about to read. You have your choice of feature screenplays, numerous shorts (including a VR short) and some comic formats in case you're up for something a bit different. The links to my comics would make awesome storyboards if you want to...Read more

It's a Great Place to Work... Depending on One's Tastes

It’s a Great Place to Work
Cheerful workers try to reassure a job applicant who freaks when a security lockdown interrupts her interview.

Chances are we all have an ‘interview from hell’ story or two.

But few can rival that which Colleen experiences when applying for a Lab Tech job at Gropp Pharmagenetics. You think working in an Amazon warehouse sucks the most?  Apply to Gropp; that might change your mind.

“It’s a Great Place to Work” by Chris Hicks takes us on a suspenseful ride through seemingly frightful events. 

No matter where the story rollercoaster loops, "Work" reassuringly holds our hand, screams in delight and rides along.  Which is nothing to be alarmed about.  After all, festival rides are safe and fun. Everything will be okay. We hope.

Take this situation, for example. Dressed in a suit - resume in hand - Colleen's just settling in when alarm bells sound. 

Not exactly a good start, still....

COLLEEN
Are you sure everything's okay?

RECEPTIONIST
(flustered but trying to sound cheerful)
We're fine! Oh, we're just fine.
Everything is going to be just fine.

The Receptionist crouches down behind the table.

RECEPTIONIST 
Could you do me a favor and just crouch down here with me?

It’d be hard to be scared with such a comforting character there to ease your mind.  But inevitably - things get worse. For instance, three security guards race down the hallway, scream into walkie-talkies as they fly by.

COLLEEN
Maybe it would be easier if I just rescheduled and came back some other time?

RECEPTIONIST
Don't be silly! You're here already.
We should just stay put.
Do you hear me? Just, stay put.

Which Colleen does - because Gropp has magnificent benefits. A terrific 401-k... and did we mention yoga class? 

But is improved flexibility and annual dental cleanings worth surviving Code Bravo, Level 3? As things spin out of control, even our cheerful receptionist loses her cool - and gestures the sign of the cross.

Where does this ride end? Who knows? Give the wheel - and this script - a spin. And find out if Colleen agrees with the title or not.

With quirky characters, an emergency situation and humorous dialogue, “It’s a Great Place to Work” is a classically fun amusement ride. One that would be equally thrilling to produce!

The Script

It’s a Great Place to Work

Cheerful workers try to reassure a job applicant who freaks when a security lockdown interrupts her interview.

About The Reviewer

Fairly Finfield's picture
Real name: 

Fin is a storytelling enthusiast who has been a popular contributor to several fiction and screenwriting blogs for 8 years or so. Readers often note his skill with humor and plot twists. He also informally coaches other aspiring writers of fiction, and has a good eye for both detail and...Read more

About The Writer

Chris Hicks's picture
Real name: 

The bio section. I never know if this should be treated like an origin story or something that could be converted into an obituary by changing the tense of the verbs. Perhaps a blend of the two is the best approach to take. I should include some details about myself. I’m Chris, aka the Chris in...Read more

The Gift - A Picture Perfect Tale You Won't Want to Erase from Your Memory

I'm a soppy bugger and I have to admit, I had to dry my eyes a little after reading this one. I'm a big believer in truth within storytelling, truth about life as brutal and heartbreaking as it can be. To me, that's the crux of a good story, while we're entertained, we learn something that sometimes can be a bitter pill to swallow. The Gift by Lisa Sheridan is a bitter little pill incased in a thick layer of sugar so sweet you don't see what's coming and that's why it makes it one of the best short scripts I've yet read.

BOY (V.O.)
I remember a time when my mother was truly happy. 
Nothing in the world compared to the warmth of her radiance.

Coming in at just over five pages and with only around twenty-five lines of dialogue, Lisa gives us a masterclass in effecient writing. This is a journey, a life of a child forming into an boy, with tragic backstory and aspiration to make his mother happy. A boy with a gift that, despite all his efforts, he cannot seem to use in a way that makes a real long-term difference, that is until he sees the bigger picture and realises what he needs to do.

In a way, I think this is a story that any creative will relate to, especially within the arts. The practice of dreaming up what feels life the gifts people need to be happy, but then facing failure over and over and questioning if we're actually the problem and not the solution.

BOY (V.O.)
But no matter how many moments of joy I would bring, they 
always were short lived. That bottomless despair would 
return. And our world would return to darkness.

The Gift is begging to be made into a film festival darling, everything is there to do it. The script oozes confident writing with just the kind of clever prose needed to convey heaps of emotional direction with only a few choice words. The only real logistical demand is six actors, four of which to play a child of various ages. That's easily achievable and well worth the effort to make something that moves an audience and says something important about life.

The Script

The Gift

A neglected boy uses his unusual talent to bring his despondent mother joy.

About The Reviewer

CJ Walley's picture
Real name: 

I’m here for the gritty movies, the rebellious movies, the b-movies, and the hangout movies, those features that dare to be good old fashioned entertainment and pack a punch harder than their budgets would suggest.

I love pulp and exploitation, car chases and gunplay, but also depth and...Read more

About The Writer

Lisa Sheridan's picture
Real name: 

Lisa Sheridan is in love with screenwriting. She is a longtime resident of the western hemisphere including the San Francisco Bay Area and (a brief stint in) Hawaii.Read more

The Gift - As True As Can Be

The Gift
A neglected boy uses his unusual talent to bring his despondent mother joy.

Children witness so much more than we give them credit for.  And they give us plenty, too.  A glimpse at the joy of living we once knew.  And unconditional love – a blessing impossible to ever repay.

And that's a gift that knows no bounds. 
Just how far would a child go to make his heartbroken mother happy?  Read this script and find out.

Lisa Sheridan's The Gift: written through the eyes of an innocent child.

INT. LIVING ROOM - DAY

THE RAIN

The MAN storms out the front door, slamming it behind him.

BOY (V.O.)
And then one day he left.
Said he wasn't ready for a family.
Said I was an accident. That he tried to make it work.

The mother sits on the couch trying to cry her lover back. Her face buried in a tissue.
The boy, now 2 years old, stands at her feet, invisible. He clutches a doll for comfort.

BOY (V.O.)
If he only knew what else he took with him that day.

The mother's weeping intensifies.

INT. CHILD'S BEDROOM - DAY

The boy, now 6 years old, sits at a child's desk. He stares at the surface.

BOY (V.O.)
Since then, I discovered I have a special gift unlike anything else in this world.
A gift that brings light.

ON THE DESKTOP
A simple drawing of a woman, boy, and house.
The boy picks up a coloring pencil. Draws a RED DRESS on the woman.
He sets down the pencil. Studies the drawing. Decides he likes it. He tapes it on the wall.
Suddenly, the doorbell rings.

What’s on the other side?  Read on, and find out.

But don’t assume it all ends there. 
Because no matter how much love backs them up, some Gifts cost more than others.
It all depends what one’s prepared to pay…

A study in poetic imagery, Lisa Sheridan’s The Gift is told primarily in Voice Over.  Which makes its message all the more pure and emotionally poignant.  And when you inevitably end up crying: just imagine how audiences would react to The Gift onscreen?

 

The Script

The Gift

A neglected boy uses his unusual talent to bring his despondent mother joy.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen short screenplays, three feature screenplays and two TV pilots. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood...Read more

About The Writer

Lisa Sheridan's picture
Real name: 

Lisa Sheridan is in love with screenwriting. She is a longtime resident of the western hemisphere including the San Francisco Bay Area and (a brief stint in) Hawaii.Read more

Rustbucket - A Scrappy Little Treasure

Rustbucket
In a city of sand and steel, a precocious young girl discovers a "friend" amongst the rubble.

World building is a hard thing to do in a feature script, never mind a short, but Rust Bucket from Colton Simpson uses just ten lines to take us to a future LA full of decaying materials both organic and mechanical. He also introduces us to our hero, Lylly, a tiny 9.5 year old little girl living her life as a scrapper.

LYLLY 
D'ya need a friend?

This is a story about friendship and sets about hammering home the old saying “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure”, and it does so with quite the punch. There’s moments here that take us back to the likes of WALL-E but Colton isn’t here to hold back and tell us something fit for a division of Disney - Rustbucket swings a lot harder.

Despite getting no response, Lylly sees something in the LAPD Defender Bot she has stumbled upon and, despite her slender build and tiny stature, sets about dragging the beast to her ramshackle home, in which lies something ominous and dark.

She soon gets that metal beast a new lease of life but nearly at the cost of her own. We learn why this public servant has been sent to the trash heap and she offers both care and repair to his mournful moans.

LYLLY
Why would someone throw you away?

Then things take a turn and we see a sad side to this future dystopia which is worrying familiar in our own. Trash and treasure take a new meaning and, well... this line says it all.

GONTHER 
See Jhames? I love the fiesty ones.

The final conclusion, you’ll have to read it to see yourself. Just like raw iron oxide, it ain’t pretty.

Despite the rundown World it encapsulates, this script is highly polished from the storytelling to every word that carries us on our journey. There’s a good reason why it won the Reddit Short Film Proverb Contest and any filmmaker rummaging through all the short scripts out there needs to take a look at this gem that's just begging to become animated. 

The Script

Rustbucket

In a city of sand and steel, a precocious young girl discovers a "friend" amongst the rubble.

About The Reviewer

CJ Walley's picture
Real name: 

I’m here for the gritty movies, the rebellious movies, the b-movies, and the hangout movies, those features that dare to be good old fashioned entertainment and pack a punch harder than their budgets would suggest.

I love pulp and exploitation, car chases and gunplay, but also depth and...Read more

About The Writer

Colton Simpson's picture
Real name: 

An avid reader, gamer, and movie-goer that's working on getting stories from my little screen to one slightly larger.

With a little less than a year's experience under my belt, my science fiction short, "Rustbucket", won Reddit's "Short Film Proverb Contest". Read more

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