Girl in the Fence - Look Hard Enough, and You'll See.... | Script Revolution

Girl in the Fence - Look Hard Enough, and You'll See....

The Girl in the Fence
An anomaly in an online photo opens a divide between a childless couple which may be resolved if only they can understand what the photo is trying to reveal.

Have you ever looked at a pile of scattered puzzle pieces of a landscape scene and thought, “Oh, how beautiful.” Probably not.  But, as you twist and turn the shapes and begin to interlock the pieces, something that was merely cardboard cutouts soon forms an image of beauty that resonates with you.

And have you searched through that same pile, looking for one piece in particular to fill in the gap, just for the satisfaction of making it complete?

And then if you try hard enough once more: can you even picture yourself there, in that scene enjoying the beauty of it all?

In Anthony Cawood’s “The Girl in the Fence,”  Jodie believes she has found something that will fill the gap in her life. But her husband Grady doesn’t quite see things the way she does.

JODIE
Hey, take a look at this.

GRADY, 50s, balding and bespectacled enters the room carrying a bowl of soup.

GRADY
Can I eat first?

He holds up the bowl.

JODIE
No, this first... it's... beautiful.

He raises an eyebrow, but sees she's excited, so acquiesces. He puts the bowl down and joins her on the couch.

GRADY
So?

Jodie turns the laptop round a bit so he can see better.
INSERT: Laptop screen Street view, large garden fence, a few cars.
Jodie toggles the view round a little, a gate, more cars.

JODIE
See?

GRADY
Yes, our street, our fence, fame at last.

JODIE
No, not that, this.

INSERT: Laptop screen She zooms in on the screen, their garden fence looms large.

JODIE
Now?

GRADY
No... wait…

A finger points at a knot in the wood of the fence.

JODIE
It's a --

GRADY
(sarcastic)
A knot in the wood that looks a bit like a face.

She pushes his hand off the keyboard and zooms in some more. The face projects from the wall.

JODIE
It's a girl.

GRADY
If you say so.

JODIE
I do. Wonder how it got there?

GRADY
Well, the fence has been there forever.

He smiles, amused with his own joke.

JODIE
Let's go check.

GRADY
Now?

He points to the window, it’s pitch black outside. Jodie is already up and heading out of the room.

GRADY
Apparently so.

However, in order to appreciate the beauty of life’s enchantments, one’s desires must far exceed one’s need for proof of the extraordinary. And in this case, Jodie’s desires lead her on a magical path to discovery.

“The Girl in the Fence” gently weaves the sadness of an irreplaceable loss with the magical wonders of following your heart.

But, be warned, this isn’t a script that you can take at face value, because maybe, just maybe this is the remarkable journey you’ve been waiting to discover for yourself.

The Script

The Girl in the Fence

An anomaly in an online photo opens a divide between a childless couple which may be resolved if only they can understand what the photo is trying to reveal.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written fourteen short screenplays, five feature screenplays and two TV pilots. In 2019, one of her short horror scripts "Redirected" was produced, and one of her holiday features "Joy for Christmas" was optioned. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood Tales, Emporium Gazette, and Night Visions. In 2012, she won two...Read more

About The Writer

Anthony Cawood's picture
Real name: 

Award-winning screenwriter with one feature produced and a further four features optioned or in pre-production. In addition to features, over forty short scripts produced/sold/optioned - including ten filmed. Also occasionally pens screenwriting articles, interviews with writers and filmmakers, and even a short story or two. You can find out more at www.anthonycawood.co.ukRead more