Shootin' The Shorts | Page 3 | Script Revolution

Shootin' The Shorts

Shootin' The Shorts is run by J.E. Clarke a longtime prolific screenwriter who loves to give others a little boost in the marketplace by highlighting why she believes their short script may stand out. She brings with her a loyal band of readers who share the same compassionate attitude who have joined her cause as it's grown and grown to connect writers with filmmakers on a monthly basis. Now it finds a home here on Script Revolution.

This is all about highlighting what makes a script great by focusing on the positives. You'll find no negative criticism or lists of issues here. Submitting a short script for consideration couldn't be easier, simply scroll down to the bottom of your script edit page and tick the "Submit to Shootin' The Shorts" checkbox. Please note; it takes time to get through all submissions, everything is subjective, and we're by no means saying these are the best short scripts on Script Revolution, they are simply the ones that have found an admirer within this section - CJ

Stay Six Feet Apart - But Can You?

STAY SIX FEET APART
Two sweethearts reveal the darker side of dating in a post-virus world.

When a stroll in the park turns to love at first sight, young sweethearts, Aaron and Paige, find themselves navigating the road to romance in a socially distanced world.  But with the rules of old turned taboo, the new normal takes its toll and desire proves a force of nature too great to resist.

At a little over a page in length, Rob Herzog’s Stay Six Feet Apart delivers a snack-sized script with a timely subject wrapped up with a wince inducing twist of horror.  Two characters, one location and dialogue-free, Stay Six Feet Apart would make a great short script for a filmmaker/make-up artist combo looking for post-lockdown inspiration.

The Script

Stay Six Feet Apart

A socially distanced flirtation takes a hideous turn.

About The Reviewer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 

Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount of plaid and uses a calculator for the most basic of sums.Read more

About The Writer

Rob Herzog's picture
Real name: 

My chief talent isn’t writing, it’s being afraid. As a kid, I freaked out about spontaneous human combustion, killer bees, and the prospect of a bathtub shark attack. And the 3,600 miles between me and the Loch Ness Monster wasn’t nearly enough. All of this youthful anxiety runs wild in my screenplays. Blame the neighborhood weirdo kid for setting me on this path. When I was six, he predicted that our neighborhood would be attacked by window ghouls. These ghouls supposedly would claw into...Read more

All Good - Even Better!

All Good
When his father is released from a mental institution, a confused teenage boy
begins questioning his mother about his father’s return to the family home.

As difficult as adulthood can be, life is arguably at its most confusing during our teen years. Especially when transitioning from adolescence. Our bodies are changing, our voices are cracking and our hormones begin to take over. It’s also a time when we’re slowly being introduced to some of the cruel and harsh realities of life. It’s when we’re at our most insecure and angst-y, struggling to find our identities… all while trying just to fit in. But sometimes discovering who you are makes fitting in difficult. Especially for 13-year old Thom, the shy, lonely protagonist in Ben Clifford’s heartfelt coming-of-age drama, “All Good”.

Before we even FADE IN, we already get a sense of where Thom’s head is at through his opening dialogue:

THOM (PRE-LAP)
I think about death. I can’t stop
thinking about death. Not that I want to die.
Not my death.

This is just another Wednesday at the guidance counselor’s office. Every Wednesday, Thom pays Mrs. Larkin a visit and lets off some steam. When your guidance counselor is the closest thing to a friend you have, you know you’re pretty lonely. The closest thing to friendly interaction he has with someone his own age is when he’s being bullied while sitting alone at lunch.

MRS. LARKIN
You come here every Wednesday afternoon
and tell me you have a new ailment. I’m beginning
to wonder what’s so special about Wednesdays.

THOM
I just don’t like math.

MRS. LARKIN
I don’t believe that’s it. What’s Wednesday, for you?

We find out that Wednesday is also Thom’s visitation day with his father, Graham, who currently resides within the confines of a mental health facility – after getting arrested for running around naked in public and screaming incoherently at tourists. But Graham seems to be doing pretty well these days. So well, in fact, that he’s been cleared to go back home the next day – though he’s not quite allowed to move back in with his wife, Kathy, and son, Thom just yet.

Eager to make things right with his wife, Graham practically begs Thom to put in a good word for him. But Kathy seems to have other plans, changing the subject every time Thom asks, “When is Dad moving back in?” Until she later gives him her answer:

KATHY
Your father is sick —

THOM
No, he’s better.

KATHY
And he’ll get sick again. And he’ll get better again.
I’ve known him longer than you. I’ve known him
for twenty years longer than you.

Not the least bit interested in rekindling her marriage, Kathy seems to be spending A LOT of time with another kinda-single mother named Tina, whose son, Fraser, is right around Thom’s age. Well aware of her son’s loner status, Kathy introduces the two young teens, who have something in common – complicated relationships with their fathers. Through this bond, Thom and Fraser become friends. But Thom has been hiding a secret – he’s gay. And after an awkward moment during a sleepover, Thom decides to run away from home in embarrassment.

To further describe how the rest of this plays out wouldn’t be doing the story justice. Beautifully written, author Ben Clifford tackles themes such as mental health, self-discovery and sexuality with great sensitivity and care. The characters feel like real people and the way the story is told feels like it comes from a very genuine place – as if the author lived it, himself.

Sure to give you the feels, “All Good” is a fantastic slice-of-life drama that would do very well on the film festival circuit – highly recommended to any filmmakers looking to tackle a strong character piece with difficult themes.

The Script

All Good!

When his father is released from a mental institution, a confused teenage boy begins questioning his mother about his father's return to the family home.

About The Reviewer

Michael Kospiah's picture
Real name: 

Hey, what's up? 

I'm an award-winning screenwriter based out of New York City who specializes in darker subject matter and themes. My first produced feature film, "The Suicide Theory" won the Audience Award at the 2014 Austin Film Festival as well as the Grand Jury Prize (Best Picture) at the Dances With Films Festival in Hollywood. After a brief theatrical release and a three-year run on Netflix, "The Suicide Theory" is now available to watch on Amazon Prime, Itunes...Read more

About The Writer

Ben Clifford's picture
Real name: 

I'm an Australian screenwriter interested in writing drama and comedy. I am greatly inspired by the works of Peter Weir, Harmony Korine, the Marx Brothers, Todd Solondz, Andrea Arnold, and Cate Shortland. My shorts are all free to use with my permission. Please feel free to contact me and let me know if you have any questions, comments, requests, or feedback. Thanks for visiting my bio.Read more

Buddy Cop - Warning, "Lethal Laughter" Ahead...

Buddy Cop
A pair of actors breakout of the tired buddy cop movie cliches.

Detectives Carver and Briggs look into the trunk of a car and behold the haul of Columbia’s finest that rests in front of them. It’s the find of a lifetime, our on screen buddy cop duo have executed their job to perfection and every genre defining trope seems to be falling into place. That is until Carver and Briggs attempt to regurgitate the expected lines and have a slight change of heart…

CARVER
Twenty-two years on the force.
I’ve never seen so much dope in my life.
After this, I’m as good as retired.

Detective Briggs steps into frame.

BRIGGS
Well, isn’t this something.
(extends hand)
Detective Briggs.

Carver refuses to shake hands.

CARVER
Yeah, I know. I read your file.
You’re a country boy huh?

BRIGGS
You better believe it.
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Born and raised.
What about you? Where are you from?

CARVER
Not now kid. I’m too tired for these lines.

BRIGGS
Excuse me.
(looks around nervously)
What lines?

CARVER
You know the clichés. You’re young.
Give it time. You’ll want to veer off script too.

BRIGGS
What about the director?

CARVER
He’s not paying attention.

Cut to director Jason, this is his project and he doesn’t take kindly to two renegade (actor) cops going off-piste and deciding to subvert an entire genre just because they are fed up with the usual hoops they have to jump through. But Briggs and Carver are no ordinary actors, no, they are thespian rogues who care not for tropes and rogue they go. On their adventure they encounter a badly named Russian crime boss, a really angry Police Chief and the usual stereotypical danger, all the while questioning what the point of it all really is.

Buddy Cop is a witty short that takes a sardonic swipe at expected conventions, then somehow both fulfils and batters them down at the same time. Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour, whatever the next Shane Black movie is likely to be, all the expectations one has of a buddy cop movie are channelled into 9 pages and subverted with comedic precision by writer Christian Johnson. If you’re looking for a short film which knows its way around an overdone genre and isn’t afraid to bear its teeth and point it out, then look no further than Christian’s comedic creation that breaks the mould with rebellious abandon, and then delivers a cheesy line on its way out of the room.

The Script

Buddy Cop

A pair of actors breakout of the tired buddy cop movie cliches.

About The Reviewer

Cam Gray's picture
Real name: 

Surreal comedies are my release, but everyone else seems to like my dramas so I've put them up here for the sensible readers...

Recently graduated from the London Film School and I'm now attempting to get some of these wonderful pieces of work out there into the real world. If you're keen on any of them, or actually have comments and thoughts (they're genuinely always welcome), let me know.

Current masterpieces include a drama that stars a peacock and a single mother,...Read more

About The Writer

Christian Johnson's picture
Real name: 

I've been writing for 10 years. I've completed several shorts, comedy sketches, ten minute plays and a couple of TV pilots. Always looking for new avenues to connect with other writers and industry professionals. My motto is "Write every day."Read more

Potato Radio - Plug in, Tune In... and Find Out!

Potato Radio
Isolated and bored, a man fashions a homemade transmitter that leads to an unexpected connection

If you’re like me, you’ve been trying to find new ways to keep yourself entertained while being stationed under the proverbial rock that we call our homes. I’ve been reading a lot of screenplays lately, but I’ve been trying to find other hobbies to break the daily, monotonous quarantine routine. For one, I was mainly watching Netflix, Amazon Prime and Shudder. Bored out of my mind, I decided to mix things up a bit and try out Hulu. Does that count as a new hobby?

Okay, I guess not. It really is hard finding something new to enjoy. If only I had the imagination that David, the main character in Paul Knauer’s quirky comedy, “Potato Radio” had.

The story opens much like my day begins – flipping through TV channels.

DAVID
Nope. Seen it. Stupid. Figured it out in the first five minutes.
Good – the first eight times. Nope.

This almost feels like a biography – MY biography.

But after aimlessly channel surfing, he finds something on TV that inspires his new hobby.

TV PROFESSOR (V.O.)
Once you’ve inserted the pennies into the potato,
simply connect the wires…

David leans forward.

TV PROFESSOR (V.O.)
Attach the bulb – and, there you have it.
A potato-powered light.

DAVID
No. Way.

His mind officially blown, he sets out to create something of his own using a potato – a radio. I’m sure you’ve probably guessed that going by the title.

After putting it all together, David’s really not sure whether or not it works. But he has fun with it, nevertheless. He even hosts his own imaginary potato-themed radio show that he thinks only he can hear.

DAVID
It’s a beautiful morning at K-P-T-O,
home to all your potato related hits.
Are you ready to do the mashed potato?

Unbeknownst to him, his annoying schlub of a next-door neighbor, Russell, seems to be hearing a voice in his head – David’s voice. Not sure if he’s sick or if he’s experiencing the effects of cabin fever after a lot of time spent alone, Russell makes a phone call.

RUSSELL
… Does the COVID make you hear voices?
(listens)
What difference does it –
(listens)
Potatoes, okay? They’re talking about potatoes.

Despite living next door to each other, the two really haven’t had many friendly interactions. In fact, David is a little fed up with Russell, who has a habit of drinking outside and then throwing the empty cans into David’s yard.

It’s not long before David realizes that Russell can somehow hear his potato radio transmissions. However, Russell doesn’t know that it’s David creating these transmissions.

So, David decides to have a little fun with Russell to teach him a lesson and get even with him for littering his yard with empty beer cans.

With a lot of writers, this could have gone into a very mean-spirited, back-and-forth direction. But Paul Knauer keeps it light-hearted and borderline whimsical without compromising the comedy. I, personally, am drawn towards horror films and thrillers. But, in these dark times, this script was a nice breath of fresh, COVID-free air. It made me feel good and left me with a smile on my face.

The Script

Potato Radio

When a bored and lonely man's science project unexpectedly agitates his neighbor, he decides to use it to his advantage.

About The Reviewer

Michael Kospiah's picture
Real name: 

Hey, what's up? 

I'm an award-winning screenwriter based out of New York City who specializes in darker subject matter and themes. My first produced feature film, "The Suicide Theory" won the Audience Award at the 2014 Austin Film Festival as well as the Grand Jury Prize (Best Picture) at the Dances With Films Festival in Hollywood. After a brief theatrical release and a three-year run on Netflix, "The Suicide Theory" is now available to watch on Amazon Prime, Itunes...Read more

About The Writer

Paul Knauer's picture
Real name: 

I’m an optioned screenwriter working out of the Kansas City area. My main focus is thrillers and slightly absurdist comedy with heart. But, I believe becoming a better writer requires the ability to push personal boundaries, so you’ll notice a thorough mix of genres in my portfolio. 

Born and raised in St. Louis, I’ve lived in multiple small towns around Missouri, and now Kansas. My projects often center on life in the Midwest -- highlighting the heart of the hard-working Midwest soul...Read more

Ugly Profile - Innocence is in the Eye of the Beholder...

UGLY PROFILE
After a spate of terrorist attacks, four commuters are forced to confront their
darkest impulses when a ‘suspicious looking’ stranger boards their train carriage
.

In an age of terror and paranoia, even the most routine task can become burdened with the weight of fear and suspicion.  With the grim toll of recent terror attacks fresh in their minds, four friends find their journey distracted by the arrival of a nervous young passenger who just happens to fit the profile.

With just five minutes before the rush-hour crowd boards, the four must choose between passing judgement on a total stranger based on the ugliest of prejudice and assumption, or suffer the possible consequences of inaction:

He takes a deep breath.

HARRY
But if this kid is a threat we have less than
five minutes ’til we reach our stop.

LAKEISHA
Your stop.

HARRY
Yeah, sorry. Forgot you go one more.
We know ’our stop’ is when the crowd boards.

CARLOS
His target?

HARRY
Could very well be. Should be packed.
Maybe over a hundred. Will do a lot of damage.

LAKEISHA
Oh come on guys. His target?
Will do a lot of damage?
Already convicted the kid have we?

Harry ignores Lakeisha’s protest.

HARRY
We can all step off to be on the safe side,
but then, how would we feel if...

Harry looks over at Faisal, hate in his eyes.

LAKEISHA
While I disagree with this scenario I for one am not a coward.
I will not leave this train. This is pathetic!

STU
I’m no coward either but there’s only one way to be safe...
Take him down.

LAKEISHA
What if you’re wrong?

But what if they’re right?

What if this young man with the backpack is about to commit an atrocity?

What if he’s simply another passenger just like them…

…Or what if our fears could be used against us in ways we never imagined?

Martin Cox’s Ugly Profile is a short script with a broad appeal; blending the tragedy of our age with everyday experience to deliver a contained drama that’s packed with tension and enough twists to keep you guessing.  This is a fantastic script for the filmmaker looking to take their craft to the next level.  10 pages, five characters, some extras, and a contained location.

The Script

Ugly Profile.

Terrorists' bombings have caused abject fear in the local community. Four commuting friends meet up on their regular train and are convinced that a bomber is on board. But can they stop the carnage?

About The Reviewer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 

Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount of plaid and uses a calculator for the most basic of sums.Read more

About The Writer

Martin Cox's picture
Real name: 

My name is Martin Cox and I am an Englishman, London born and bred but now a proud American citizen, domiciled in fabulous Las Vegas with my beautiful Asian wife Anita. Yes, I am very blessed!.

I feel extremely humbled to join the Script Revolution and be in the company of so many talented writers.

Since childhood, I have had a love affair with the written word, weaving copious amounts of rhyming tapestries, essays and plays for my fellow students to share and perfom in. This...Read more

Short Fuse - Time (and Life) is Short...

Short Fuse
A young man believing himself to be on the brink of greatness
has his dreams crushed when Covid-19 strikes.

All right, after almost five months of the “COVID Blues”, I’m calling it, I’m sure we can all use a little bit of a pick-me-up. Now, you wouldn’t think you’d find that in a COVID-themed script. And I’m sure a lot of people are just sick (no pun intended) of being reminded of everything that’s going on in the world, specifically the goddamned corona virus.

But then, when things seem bleakest, along comes a beacon of light in the form of writer L. Chambers’ Short Fuse.

We open our story in a 5th floor walk-up on the Upper West Side of Manhattan – I live on the 5th floor of a 6th floor walk-up, so right away, not only can I relate to her main character, but I can feel his pain. We meet a twenty-something named Toby who, like many of us during lockdown, is struggling with his mental health due to the mandated solitary confinement. Disheveled and probably in need of a shower, he sadly scours the internet for a solution…

Twitchy fingers, nails bitten to the quick guide a mouse over internet search results –

Top Ten Tips for looking after your mental health during Isolation.
Quarantine the easy way.
Beat loneliness during ISO.
Virtual Dating and Sex.

The mouse stops on –

Online Pandemic Counseling – No Waiting!

Desperate for a pick-me-up himself, and in need of someone to talk to, he gives this online pandemic counseling a shot.

This is when we meet the sassy, cigarette-smoking, Long Island-accented psychotherapist, Judy Goldberg. Think Theresa Caputo from The Long Island Medium, but a therapist instead of a ghost-whisperer.

Judy cuts right to the chase.

JUDY
I’ll talk, you listen.

TOBY
Um, okay.

JUDY
So, you’re depressed, am I right?

TOBY
Bit down in the dumps, yeah.

We soon find out that, because of the lockdown, Toby has lost a “job” of sorts and no longer feels like he has purpose because of it. He was “number one in his field” as he states later during their conversation.

Though Judy’s assumptions are pretty innocent, through a series of cutaways, we find out that Toby’s failed aspirations were much, much darker than Judy is aware of when we see shots of him tinkering with electronic wires, a battery pack, various chemicals and flammable paraphernalia.

TOBY
I failed to complete an assignment.
(beat)
It was… really important. My principle courier was grounded
and my men were stranded at the airport. It was going to
be my life’s work, with great reward.

We soon discover exactly what he’s talking about as more visual details emerge, discovering just how dark his aspirations were.

But, Michael, I thought you said this was uplifting?

It actually really is. I won’t give away too much of the ending, but throughout Toby’s depression due to self-quarantining, he grows and becomes a better person once the quarantine is lifted because of it. This also due in large part to Judy’s positive reinforcement, delivered through funny, witty dialogue. Her quirky and fun personality keeps the script from going too dark. She’d be an excellent character for an actor to take on. And the Toby character’s arc is pretty amazing as well, considering this was only a six-page script. This is a testament to some great writing.

Easy to film with great characters, I highly recommend this to any filmmakers looking for a new project during social distancing.

The Script

Short Fuse

A young man believing himself to be on the brink of greatness has his dreams crushed when Covid-19 strikes.

About The Reviewer

Michael Kospiah's picture
Real name: 

Hey, what's up? 

I'm an award-winning screenwriter based out of New York City who specializes in darker subject matter and themes. My first produced feature film, "The Suicide Theory" won the Audience Award at the 2014 Austin Film Festival as well as the Grand Jury Prize (Best Picture) at the Dances With Films Festival in Hollywood. After a brief theatrical release and a three-year run on Netflix, "The Suicide Theory" is now available to watch on Amazon Prime, Itunes...Read more

About The Writer

L. Chambers's picture
Real name: 

L.Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She currently works as a freelance web-content editor and lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia.Read more

Skip - Don't Miss A Beat on This One!

Skip
A woman finds it difficult to communicate with her mother, but will that change when her great-granddaughter comes for a visit?

Jane drops her daughter, Sophie, off with Anna, her mother, Sophie’s grandmother. Sophia sings an old but memorable jump rope song. Anna recognizes this old song and chimes in. They sing together as Sophie jumps.

And the generations don’t stop there! Anna takes Sophia along to the retirement home to visit Gloria, Anna’s mother, Sophie’s great grandmother. Anna wheels Gloria out into the garden. She tries to talk with Gloria, but we learn Gloria has lost her memory. However, as Gloria takes interest in young Sophia, a smile comes to her face and for that moment, her memory is reawakened by the chant of the old jump rope rhyme, Cinderella dressed in yellow and just when we think her memory is back, Anna asks Gloria if she recognizes her. But it is a very sad moment when Gloria doesn’t respond.

This is a sad but sweet story that would be super low budget and easy to produce. It’s a strong piece that everyone can relate to. No matter our age, we all know time is something we cannot stop or even turn back without a time machine but it’s part of life.

Things I love about Skip:

I love the way the writer scans over four generations weaving the jump rope rhyme throughout. We see youth in Sophie, the middle aged always-on-the-go in Jane, the gracefully aging Anna and then Gloria who is in a state of waiting for death to come. I super love the way the writer touches our heart at the end when we see that Sophie has left her jump rope in Gloria’s lap. This story makes a reader appreciate each stage of life. It is also chock full of female cast which is hot right now, and it’s a story I think could wow a lot of festivals!

About the reviewer: Dena McKinnon is an optioned and produced screenwriter who also writes on assignment. Her IMDb credits. She can be reached at: girlbytheshore (a) hotmail.

The Script

Skip

A woman finds it difficult to communicate with her mother, but will that change when her great-granddaughter comes for a visit?

About The Reviewer

J.E. Clarke's picture
Real name: 

Known for her unique characters and plots, J.E. Clarke has optioned her feature length horror, "Containment" with Primestar Film Group (director Mike Elliott of Scorpion King 4 attached), her SF feature "Stream" with Purryburry Productions, John Noble of "Fringe" and "Lord of the Rings" attached.  Her fantasy/SF "Evergreen" (cowritten for Adam Zeulhke of Zenoscope Productions), is currently in preproduction, along with Entanglement...Read more

About The Writer

Gary Howell's picture
Real name: 

I'm an attorney by trade, but a writer at heart. I have written several shorts, and I am currently involved with a feature that I have worked on the past year that is now in development, with an Australian director at the helm. I have had three short films produced, "Country Road 12" that stars Dee Wallace ("E.T.", "Poltergeist"), "Skip," and "Study Date."  I also acted as an executive producer on a short, "Clean Slate."

I have also co-written one dramedy, "The Journeyers", that was...Read more

The Five Stages of Grief - How Much Togetherness is TOO much?

THE FIVE STAGES OF GRIEF
A suburban family goes through the five stages of grief during the pandemic.

Imagine if you will, some of film’s famous comedic families – The Griswolds, The Fockers, and The Simpsons holed up in isolation. Scary thought… but also ripe for comedy gold.

Now we can add to that list with Dave Lambertson’s fictional family in The Five Stages Of Grief  as he takes us on a comedic journey of a family in lockdown. Cleverly utilizing a series of emotions – denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance he chronicles one family’s time in isolation to terrific comedic effect.

The story opens on a typical nuclear family – Dad - John, Mom - Jane, and their cute as can be kids, Annabelle and Tommy.

Jane and the kids are huddled in front of the TV squabbling over what movie to watch when a news flash interrupts family time –

John enters the room… dressed in golf attire… a golf bag slung over his shoulder…

JOHN
See ya in about five hours.

JANE
Wait.

Jane points the remote at the TV.

TELEVISION REPORTER ON TV
…The State is now under a shelter in place decree
in order to decrease the spread of the virus.

JANE
Looks like no golfing.

JOHN
I’m sure they didn’t mean golf.

TELEVISION REPORTER
This includes golf.

And so begins…

DAY ONE – DENIAL

And the hilarity that ensues from each day forward…

As the family battles the perils of too much togetherness and negotiates the division of chores, shopping, cooking, homeschooling, and a house that rapidly starts to look like a bomb’s hit it, we discover lockdown is not for the faint of heart. 

John’s a head-in-the-clouds kind of guy, while Jane has her feet firmly planted on the ground. While John sees lockdown as an opportunity to try his hand at inventing the next big thing (a see-through toaster), he also dreams of finishing (starting would be nice) his screenplay opus. Jane just wants some order through all the chaos. The kids are running wild, Dad’s battling to flatten a curve of a different kind (too much home-baking will do that to you) and there’s all manner of heckling from all sides. It’s not long before all four members of this household start climbing the walls.

The Five Stages Of Grief is a hilarious slice of life comedy about the ups and downs of family-fun in quarantine, or more aptly a cautionary tale that asks the question: how much togetherness is too much? With its clever comedic one-liners, acerbic wit, and touching observations of family life The Five Stages Of Grief will have you laughing out loud.

FILMMAKERS:

Don’t deny yourself me-time. With lockdown soon to be a distant memory you’re going to want to re-emerge from self-isolation with a sure-fire crowd pleaser on your hands. Snap this one up and your acceptance speech may well be on the cards.

* The Five Stages of Grief placed firm favourite: Writer’s Choice, Simply Scripts May, 2020 challenge - The Journal Of the Plague Year – stories real and imagined/inspired by the current pandemic.

The Script

The Five Stages of Grief

A suburban family goes through the five stages of grief during the pandemic

About The Reviewer

L. Chambers's picture
Real name: 

L.Chambers has been writing all her life – especially in her head, and on scraps of paper. It’s only in the last few years she began to get serious about screen-writing. Prior to this she worked in the Features Department for ABC TV as a Program Assistant, and trained as a FAD. She currently works as a freelance web-content editor and lives with her husband (also a screenwriter) in Sydney, Australia.Read more

About The Writer

David Lambertson's picture
Real name: 

Hmmm - how does one craft a writing biography for one that has not spent a life writing? I'll give it a shot. I knew I wanted to be a writer when I was eighteen. I started writing when I was 56. In the years between I got married, had children, got divorced, got married again, had grandchildren and spent more than thirty years as a Government bureaucrat. Exciting - I know. There is good news and bad news in that. The bad news of course is that I spent my life working at a career other than...Read more

Come Along, Harry Higgins - Who Knows Where This Path Will Lead?

Come Along, Harry Higgins
Successful safe cracker Harry Higgins decides to hang up his drill for good when he meets the
woman of his dreams, only to be tailed by the constable that put him away once already.

While looking through scripts, I came upon one based on O. Henry’s short story, A Retrieved Reformation… but with a sci-fi twist! So, I just HAD to give it a read. And, boy, I did not come away from this disappointed…

In what seems like a traditional period piece, we’re taken to the year 1899, where convicted bank robber (and the story’s protagonist), Harry Higgins is serving a four-year sentence at Missouri State Penitentiary. Ten months into his sentence, while making shoes in the prison’s workshop, he’s called to the warden’s office, where he’s told that he’s just been pardoned by the governor.

Now a free man, the confident and charming Harry Higgins heads back to meet up with his old friend Davey, a bartender at the inn where Harry was originally arrested for his crime. But before he gets there, he finds a unique and possibly other-worldly way of communicating when arriving at the train station…
Harry walks toward the train station and sees a large crow land on a telegraph pole. He smiles and tips his hat.

HARRY
Let Davey know I’ll be arriving
in about 3 hours, old friend.

The crow squawks loudly and flies away.

Hmm. I know crows are supposed to be smart. And who knows? Maybe Harry’s some kind of bird whisperer or something. Of course, we find out that isn’t quite the case when Harry arrives at the bar. Upon meeting with Dave, both their eyes glow green – suggesting that these guys aren’t of this world. The crow is in fact a communication device that allows them to converse using face-time – a technology that isn’t even explored until The Jetsons hit television sets.

After enjoying several seltzer-with-milks (gross), Harry heads to his room where he retrieves a hidden briefcase containing some sort of futuristic device that allows him to easily break into bank vaults and make away with piles of money.

As Harry bounces around from town to town, knocking off bank after bank, he decides to retire from bank-robbing and settle down in the quaint town of Elmore, Kansas. He starts a shoe-making shop and eventually finds love, marrying Anna Sharp who, ironically, is the daughter of a local bank mogul. But despite going straight, the string of bank robberies preceding his change of lifestyle has caught the attention of Jack Wolfe, the pesky police constable who initially put Harry behind bars.

Hot on Harry’s trail, Wolfe eventually tracks him down in Elmore, finding out that he’s living under the alias Robert D. Thompson.

Wolfe finally has his man in his sights at the local bank where Harry’s father-in-law presents to the public his new vault – a vault deemed to be “impenetrable”, opening automatically only at certain times of the day.

Unfortunately, as the presentation continues, a little girl finds herself trapped in the vault while goofing off with a friend. And with the vault not scheduled to reopen anytime soon, the little girl’s life is at stake. If only there was someone with the kind of technology to break into this “impenetrable” vault…

A unique story with a sci-fi twist and excellent characters with impressive arcs, “Come Along, Harry Higgins” is a story that NEEDS to be on the big screen.

The Script

Come along, Harry Higgins

Successful safe cracker Harry Higgins decides to hang up his drill for good when he meets the woman of his dreams, only to be tailed by the constable that put him away once already.

About The Reviewer

Michael Kospiah's picture
Real name: 

Hey, what's up? 

I'm an award-winning screenwriter based out of New York City who specializes in darker subject matter and themes. My first produced feature film, "The Suicide Theory" won the Audience Award at the 2014 Austin Film Festival as well as the Grand Jury Prize (Best Picture) at the Dances With Films Festival in Hollywood. After a brief theatrical release and a three-year run on Netflix, "The Suicide Theory" is now available to watch on Amazon Prime, Itunes...Read more

About The Writer

Kevin Machate's picture
Real name: 

Kevin graduated from the University of Texas, with a BA in American Studies and minor in History in 2015 and got his MBA in 2019. Not surprisingly, he uses none of these educational credentials for his job. Although he began his film career as an actor, he quickly moved into Producing and eventually Directing. Kevin's films have won numerous awards worldwide having been screened in various cities in the US, Europe, South America, Oceania, and Asia.

Kevin has directed six short films...Read more

Dear God, I Quit - Jobs are Hell... for EVERYONE

Dear God, I Quit - Love Satan
When Satan hands in his resignation letter, God is forced into an impossible situation

What if God one of us? Just a slob like one of us? Just a stranger on a bus… trying to make his way home?

That’s what singer/songwriter Joan Osborne asks us in her insanely catchy 90’s pop song, “What if God Was One of Us”. If even you didn’t grow up in the 90’s, love it or hate it, I’m sure you’ve heard it before.

For obvious reasons, this song played in my head after just finishing Jay Williams (aka Vic Burns') sharp-witted comedy short, “Dear God, I Quit – Love Satan”. While Joan Osborne’s song asks us what it would be like if God was, indeed, one of us, Williams explores the scenario further… while also asking the same question about God’s rival, the Prince of Darkness himself, Lucifer.

In “Dear God, I Quit – Love Satan”, God is a slob like one of us (to answer Joan Osborne’s question)… and a drunk… and a gambling addict.

The story opens outside of a storefront on the Vegas strip where we meet Godfrey – God in human form. Unshaven and unwashed, Godfrey looks like an old homeless man, muttering profanities to himself while glugging down a bottle of whiskey. It’s been a rough go in Vegas – not only is he hammered… but he’s also broke.

That’s when his friend, Lou, sharply dressed and doing much better than his counterpart, comes to the rescue like any friend would. If you were wondering, yes, Lou is short for Lucifer. And, yes, on Earth, he and God are friends.

GODFREY
Oh Lou, is this how it ends?
How did it ever come to this?

We then cut to heaven, long before God became Godfrey and lost everything in the casinos.

This version of heaven doesn’t seem very heavenly – here, we don’t see angels playing harps with halos over their heads while riding on puffy clouds. This version of heaven looks much like an office you’d find your accountant working in. But maybe a lot less organized and a lot more filthy. Apparently, even in heaven, God is a slob like one of us.

A pile of paperwork in front of him, God seems just as stressed as any nine-to-five office worker. I guess we really were created in God’s image…

That’s when Lucifer arrives to conduct their weekly session where they discuss the balance of good and evil.

GOD
OK, I’ve enabled a couple of new strains of penicillin.

LUCIFER
Very noble.
(beat)
Well, I have introduced three new outbreaks of Ebola –
let’s see what your penicillin can do about that.

GOD
Touché.

LUCIFER
Thank you.
(beat)
Let’s see – ah yes, I’ve influenced the commission of eight new seasons
of Two And A Half Men on an over-the-top video provider.

GOD
You bastard.

But, as their session continues, Lucifer breaks some news to his counterpart, handing him a letter of resignation. Bored of his duties, Lucifer has also “seen the light”…

LUCIFER
I’ve had an awful long time to think about it.
It was wrong of me, I was suffering with delusions of grandeur.

But to truly be relieved of his duties, Lucifer needs God’s forgiveness first. But God isn’t so sure. After giving it some thought, God comes up with a plan – that he and Lucifer head down to Earth in human form. If Lucifer demonstrates good behavior and shows him that he has indeed changed, God will forgive him. But forgiveness comes with some serious consequences…

Packed with pithy dialogue and fantastic chemistry between God and Lucifer, “Dear God, I Quit – Love Satan” will make you do what any good comedy SHOULD do… laugh. And especially with the world where it is right now, God knows we could all use a good laugh.

The Script

Dear God, I Quit - Love, Satan.

When Lucifer hands in his resignation letter, God is forced into a very dark corner.

About The Reviewer

Michael Kospiah's picture
Real name: 

Hey, what's up? 

I'm an award-winning screenwriter based out of New York City who specializes in darker subject matter and themes. My first produced feature film, "The Suicide Theory" won the Audience Award at the 2014 Austin Film Festival as well as the Grand Jury Prize (Best Picture) at the Dances With Films Festival in Hollywood. After a brief theatrical release and a three-year run on Netflix, "The Suicide Theory" is now available to watch on Amazon Prime, Itunes...Read more

About The Writer

Vic Burns's picture
Real name: 

This is the section in which it appears to be increasingly 'the norm' to write about oneself in the third person so as to appear that the text was written by someone else. I can't join in I'm afraid - I'm not a football manager, and this isn't LinkedIn.

I started writing way back in 1997 whilst working in a producing theatre. Back then, there was no YouTube, Twitter or bountiful internet resources like those of today. I very quickly become disheartened and stopped writing after one...Read more

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