Shootin' The Shorts | Page 13 | Script Revolution

Shootin' The Shorts

Shootin' The Shorts is run by J.E. Clarke a longtime prolific screenwriter who loves to give others a little boost in the marketplace by highlighting why she believes their short script may stand out. She brings with her a loyal band of readers who share the same compassionate attitude who have joined her cause as it's grown and grown to connect writers with filmmakers on a monthly basis. Now it finds a home here on Script Revolution.

This is all about highlighting what makes a script great by focusing on the positives. You'll find no negative criticism or lists of issues here. Submitting a short script for consideration couldn't be easier, simply scroll down to the bottom of your script edit page and tick the "Submit to Shootin' The Shorts" checkbox. Please note; it takes time to get through all submissions, everything is subjective, and we're by no means saying these are the best short scripts on Script Revolution, they are simply the ones that have found an admirer within this section - CJ

Strayed - Love Requires Some Things Be Hidden... Right?

Strayed
A distraught little girl spots her mother stuffing a suspicious bag into a trash bin soon after her dog goes missing.

Disappointment in a child’s eyes can ravage a mother’s soul. Haunt and eat away at it. Create its own sore of sadness that can only be healed by an act of redemption.

As some wise folks often say, “A mother is only as happy as her unhappiest child.”

Brandi Self’s “Strayed” shows how one quick-thinking mom attempts to handle the unexpected...in her daughter’s best interests. She thinks.

EXT. HOUSE - CONTINUOUS

April gets out of the car. Stares wide eyed as she looks down.

APRIL
Wha...

Blood runs down the street and hits her feet. She slowly backs up.

APRIL (CONT’D)
Oh god, what did I do?

EXT. HOUSE - LATER

April finishes wrapping it up in a black trash bag. Begins washing the bloody spot off the street with a large sponge.

EXT. HOUSE - NIGHT

April crams the black trash bag into the bin.

RILEY (O.S.)
What’s that?

APRIL
(whirls around, flustered)
Oh, hi honey. How was the park?

RILEY
Bo Bo’s gone.

April sees a spot of blood on her own hand and quickly wipes it away.

“Strayed” shows that In the big scheme of things, death is a part of life. As parents, we do our best at shielding our children from the sadness of loss.

But, just how far should a mother go to save her child from heartbreak?

With a couple of locations, a couple of characters, and an ending that will leave you gasping, “Strayed” wraps it up nicely. But certainly not in the neat way you'd expect.

The Script

Strayed

A sullen little girl spots her mother stuffing a suspicious bag into a trash bin soon after her dog goes missing.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen short screenplays, three feature screenplays and two TV pilots. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood...Read more

About The Writer

Brandi Self's picture
Real name: 

I create surreal, carefully constructed stories that dissect love, morality, oppression, identity crises, alienation, and stagnation by catapulting characters into absurd, almost comically juxtaposed worlds where they must use self-examination as a tool for escape and redemption. 

...Read more

Solitude - Sometimes, It's Better to Face Fate Alone...

Solitude
A man abandons his family to spend his last moments alone.

Does anyone ever truly know what they would do in the face of death?

If you thought there was no way out, and your demise would soon be determined by an astronomic "glitch of fate":  would you choose to be surrounded by family or take your final breath alone?

Thomas J. Campbell’s short screenplay, “Solitude” explores the choice of one young family man.

The phone begins to WAIL again.

This time he does not hesitate in hanging up.

BZZT!

Seconds after he hangs up, a message appears on the screen.

SUZ (TEXT)
Oi! Where are U?!?!

He looks up from his phone - skyward. Above the tree canopy, he can see the looming presence of a large oncoming ASTEROID – a planet killer.

He watches it for a moment as it slowly creeps closer to its final destination.

BZZT!

SUZ (TEXT)
John?! Call me please!

BZZT!

SUZ (TEXT)
I’m taking the kids to mums - it’s best if we’re together.

John removes the bag from his shoulder, unzipping it, he rummages around inside.

If you thought your family might die in front of you, would you fear witnessing it more than the comfort it brought to be with them in those final hours?

Or would you try to prevent the image of your own death from being the last thing they ever viewed?

If you’re looking to film a one-character, one location, sci-fi short that questions moral choices in the face of impending doom, “Solitude” will certainly make an impact. Contact Thomas J. Campbell soon - before it’s too late... for us all!

The Script

Solitude

A man abandons his family to spend his last moments alone.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen short screenplays, three feature screenplays and two TV pilots. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood...Read more

About The Writer

Thomas J Campbell's picture
Real name: 

Thomas J Campbell is a screenwriter based in the south of England with a predilection for strange and weird fiction. Campbell's formative years where dominated by a love of comic books and horror films, a passion which continued into adulthood and would see him write for several fan-sites...Read more

Wild Flowers - Who Knows What Beauty Grows in Even the Darkest Heart?

Wild Flowers
A couple is driven apart by the death of their daughter, until her supernatural murderer intervenes and nudges them back together.

Through a subtle homage to a classic horror film, Anthony Cawood’s “Wild Flowers” brings home the devastation and emotional shutdown that builds between a couple when they lose their only child.

In black and white scenes with no dialogue, the viewer will ‘feel’ the raw emotions of grief that have taken hold of this 1930s couple.

INT. FARMHOUSE, KITCHEN - DAY (B&W)

Madeline sits at the table, head in her hands.

The kettle boils, whistle blows, volume increases steadily. Despite the piercing wail, she’s oblivious.

Ludwig enters, takes the kettle off the stove and leaves again without saying a word.

He scowls as he passes her. Madeline sobs into the silence that follows.

As they often say.... the mystery deepens from there.  Who is responsible for their sweet daughter's death?  Can Ludwig and Madeline overcome their "monstrous" loss, before the grief tears them apart?

“Wild Flowers” weaves a touch of haunting mystery throughout, but the 'aha' ending satisifies even more, and stands out.

For horror movie buff producers looking to take a classic one step further, this short screenplay packs an emotional punch that compliments the original in elegant ways. Scoop up “Wild Flowers” now.  The season of all things eerie is quickly approaching - and this is one bouquet of raw emotion you'll want to pluck!!

The Script

Wild Flowers

A couple are driven apart by the death of their daughter, until her supernatural murderer intervenes and nudges them back together.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen short screenplays, three feature screenplays and two TV pilots. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood...Read more

About The Writer

Anthony Cawood's picture
Real name: 

Award-winning screenwriter with one feature produced and a further four features optioned or in pre-production. In addition to features, he has over forty short scripts produced/sold/optioned - including ten filmed. Also occasionally pens screenwriting articles, interviews with writers and...Read more

Misplaced - Some Things are Better Lost...

Misplaced
A young boy explores the rows of an old antique store and finds something unexpected.

The ambience of an antique store, with its treasures of days past, provides an alluring mix of charm and magic to even a seasoned shopper. But add a chained entrance to a back room that warns with a “Do Not Enter” sign, and the temptation can be too much, especially for a six-year-old boy.

In Misplaced, when Max’s mother brings him along to “Grand Antiques” to get an offer for an heirloom, he marvels at the many rows and shelves of knick knacks and thingamajigs. And even though the antique dealer, with his disfigured face, gruffly warns the child not to go into the back, Max can’t help himself when he hears a jingling sound coming from the chained off room.

After he discovers the source of the sound, he finds himself in a seemingly innocent game of “Monkey See, Monkey Do.”  However, things are not always what they seem, as shown in the script segment below.

Max reaches out and their hands are within centimeters of touching. Max is suddenly jerked backwards and is face to face with the Antiques Man.

Max freezes with fear as he stares at the Antiques Man terrifying scowl. A deep scar runs up his right cheek, over his dead eye and up over his forehead.

ANTIQUES MAN
I told you to stay out of here.

Max can’t respond as he trembles. The Antiques Man takes a good look at him.

ANTIQUES MAN
Do I scare you Max?

Max nods.

ANTIQUES MAN
Then your fear is sorely misplaced, boy.

Max is frozen to the spot. The Antiques Man releases him.
.
ANTIQUES MAN
Get out of here.

The Antiques Man watches Max run and disappear through the shelves.

For directors who want to express a “Twilight Zone” type of horror through the eyes of a child, this one will meet the mark. With its detailed visuals and a well executed play on the innocence of youthful curiosity, audiences will certainly recall their own childhood fears. And if that isn’t enough, the ending creates an image that will haunt long after the credits roll.

 

The Script

Misplaced

A young boy explores the rows of an old antique store and finds something unexpected.

About The Reviewer

Linda Hullinger's picture
Real name: 

Linda Hullinger is an award-winning screenwriter and published author who has written thirteen short screenplays, three feature screenplays and two TV pilots. She’s had short stories, articles, and essays traditionally published in magazines such as Woman’s World, Over My Dead Body, Dogwood...Read more

About The Writer

Matthew Corry's picture
Real name: 

I am a writer who prides himself on creating original horror stories that avoid standard tropes and cliches. It is my goal to create stories that not only leave a stroke of fear through the viewer but also to create strong realistic characters to ensure the horror and tragedy is not simply...Read more

Mother Nature's Joke - Don't Fool with Mother Nature... Unless it's REAL Funny....

MOTHER NATURES JOKE
What could be worse than being a were-hamster?

Meet Harold.

Harold is an army vet traumatized by his experiences.  But it’s not what you think.  Harold’s trauma stems from an altogether more curious trait: his ability to ‘morph’ at the slightest hint of arousal.  While useful (and sometimes not so useful) for infiltrating an enemy stronghold, it’s long been a burden on his love life.

As Harold delves deep into his furry and frustrated past, increasingly skeptical psychiatrist, Mischa, begins to wonder if she’s been had.

If the first step to recovery is admitting you have a problem; the second is convincing your psychiatrist you turn into a hamster with every erection…

Yup. Stick with us. That's the plot.

Cam Gray’s Mother Nature’s Joke is a short ode to bar stool humour with a sprinkling of the surreal thrown in for flavour.  From the psychiatrist’s couch to a hamster’s eye tour through the corridors of Saddam’s palace in search of WMD, Mother Nature’s Joke threatens to poke more than just fun.  

That is if Harold can keep it in his pants long enough to keep himself out of a cage.

Make this your next comic project, and you'll have 'em rolling (furry or not) in the aisles!!

About The Reviewer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 

Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount...Read more

About The Writer

Cam Gray's picture
Real name: 

Surreal comedies are my release, but everyone else seems to like my dramas so I've put them up here for the sensible readers...

Recently graduated from the London Film School and I'm now attempting to get some of these wonderful pieces of work out there into the real world. If...Read more

Dog Years - Memories Never Get Old... Even If Our Furry Friends Do

Dog Years
Take a trip down memory lane. The paw-sibilities are endless.

Fun fact: Did you know 1 human year equals 7 dog years?

And we should measure things in dog years. Maybe then, we’d recognize every precious moment for what it is. Sure, “What-ifs” are important. But our “right nows”: even more.

Which is a lesson Barley – the nap loving pup – has been giving troubled owner Bobby for quite a while.  Now in the golden age of his furry life, Barley’s still the best buddy Bobby’s ever had.  And that’s a realization his human companion confirms, as they take a trip (and walk) down memory lane.

From the very first day they met, that trip’s been full of moments one shouldn’t forget. For instance:

  • That day in the cemetery Bobby drank whiskey near his mother’s grave.  And encountered a then-puppy Barley… yet another desperate stray.
     
  • That time Bobby met his human soul mate besides a lake – while Barley romped with her poodle nearby.
     
  • The numerous nights Bobby pursued his passion for writing, and faithful Barley snoozed at his feet (rather than pursuing a tennis ball instead.)
     
  • And that time Bobby almost saw his journey end in a horrific car crash – if it hadn’t been for Barley slipping out the destroyed back window and finding help.

Yep: for Bobby Barley’s been there, every step.  But now that journey’s nearing its end – because whether one walks on two feet or four, time eventually catches up to us all.

Have you ever shared Life with a dog?  If not, shame on you: go adopt one now, and don’t miss out!  But if you have:

We GUARANTEE the message of this short will rip at your heartstrings and tear ducts.  It’s real. It’s human. It’s everything that makes dog-life worthwhile.  Much like the classics Where the Red Fern Grows and Old Yeller, Dog Years will suck you in (and lick your face) from the start. Short, sweet, and chock full of sentiment, Dog Years is paws down the most endearing story of man’s best friend that you’ll read in some time.

It’s like taking a long walk with a furry BFF. Bring this tale to the screen, and audiences will remember it’s ending for years (both human and dog) to come.

 

 

The Script

Dog Years

Bobby and his canine companion, Barley, go for one last walk, reminiscing about their eventful and emotional 100 dog years together.

About The Reviewer

Karis Watie's picture
Real name: 

Karis Watie is a screenwriter from Texas who was accidentally transplanted in New England. She copes with the weather by closely studying television shows and thinking up more dramatic ways to develop characters in her own scripts. She tried the spotlight and it wasn't for her because she...Read more

About The Writer

Jeremy Storey's picture
Real name: 

Jeremy Storey, originally hails from the United Kingdom, but now resides in Seattle, WA. He first discovered the joys of writing at school, penning short stories and collaborating on comic books with his friends. Coming from a writerly family, it was clearly in his DNA to tell stories. However,...Read more

Cat and Mouse - Who's the Prey?

Cat & Mouse
When Harry’s deadly job brings him home after fifteen years,
he learns his target involves an old love, safeguarding a secret even more dangerous than him.

Cat & Mouse is the new life or death.

Harry’s from around here. Where is here exactly? London - but of course.

Harry's been gone for more than ten years, but today a strict work deadline brings him and colleague Donovan right back to the doorstep of his old life.

No one is quite sure what Harry and his wise-cracking buddy do for a living - but they spend nights dressed in expensive suits, wining and dining clients at snazzy hotels. Whatever the job entails, they’re damned good at what they do. Whatever that may be.

Truth is…Harry and Donovan are closers.

These are men most of us will never have the "pleasure" of meeting. Which is a very, very, very good thing.

When this motley pair closes something... it is never, ever reopened. They don’t punch time clocks; but they’re punctual professionals nonetheless. Clean. Efficient. Silent. In, Out and Done - before anyone has the slightest clue where they've been.

When Harry gets this latest order, he assumes it isn’t any different than other assignments he's expertly handled in the past…An assumption that turns out monstrously wrong.

Shortly after an attractive epidemiologist crosses his path - unknowingly throwing a wrench into his bloody work.

Then, Harry's old life rears its attractive head.  It's a face from the past: on a familiar form clad in jeans and a Guns’ N Roses t-shirt.  Which is when the countdown to collison begins.

In a blinding muzzle flash, Harry'll have to decide if THIS mark hits too close to home...

Take a life or risk not living to see his own future?

Tick, tock, tick, tock, DING!

What unfolds next will surely surprise - and burn an unforgettable image into one's brain.

Jeremy Storey’s Cat & Mouse is no ordinary Saturday night special. A classic story of love, blended with new age thriller, this short balances emotion and entertainment with style.  

Read this one, and we guarantee you'll be on the edge of your seat.  But take care not to fall off. As a cat, you won't see this ending coming. Sometimes it's much safer to be a mouse...

The Script

Cat & Mouse

When Harry’s deadly job brings him home, his anonymity is compromised when he learns that his target involves an old friend, safeguarding a dreadful secret.

About The Reviewer

Karis Watie's picture
Real name: 

Karis Watie is a screenwriter from Texas who was accidentally transplanted in New England. She copes with the weather by closely studying television shows and thinking up more dramatic ways to develop characters in her own scripts. She tried the spotlight and it wasn't for her because she...Read more

About The Writer

Jeremy Storey's picture
Real name: 

Jeremy Storey, originally hails from the United Kingdom, but now resides in Seattle, WA. He first discovered the joys of writing at school, penning short stories and collaborating on comic books with his friends. Coming from a writerly family, it was clearly in his DNA to tell stories. However,...Read more

Heritage - It's Time to Learn From Your Elders, Boy!

Heritage
A good for nothing southerner feels the world owes him something.
But his great great great granddaddy will soon change his mind. Time and death can’t stop fate!

Admit it, racial tensions aren’t funny. But sometimes you have to laugh - or you’ll cry at the stupidity of some folks. In Heritage, Travis Sharp creates humor out of just that sort of prickly topic; squeezing laughter out of pain.

Buford (30s) is unrepentant. An overweight, unemployed layabout; faking an injury because he doesn’t want to work. Yet Buford has time and energy for things he considers important – like putting up a confederate flag on the building his great, great, great, granddaddy built.

Not to mention hanging out with pal Earl in his trailer – drinking, smoking and bewailing the wrongs of the world.

But thanks to some unexpected visitors, all that’s about to change.

First, it’s not-so-friendly policeman Bill, who orders Buford to stop antagonizing his neighbors, and flying the Confederate Flag in their face.  But fueling tension’s Buford’s pride and joy. He swears the law won’t hold him down!  Especially when Southern identity and Heritage are on the line….

Which is when Visitor #2 pays a call: Buford’s great, great, great, granddaddy Pappy… a decorated Confederate soldier from the Civil War –  now dead over a 150 years!  And as Buford’s about to discover, that much time makes a ghost very opinionated… and wise:

Pappy rubs his chin and shakes his head.

PAPPY
You don’t have work and you don’t serve in the militia.  How do you earn your wage, my boy?

BUFORD
Well, I get a check from work comp and my wife works at the post office... She got a nice union job.

Pappy jumps back and pulls his sword out.

PAPPY
Your wife is forced to work for the Union?

The exchange that follows between the Buford generations is anything but civil.  But funny and informative as Hell.

A fightin’ man even in his grave, Pappy quickly realizes it’s the future he’s fighting for – even if he has to force his no-good descendents to behave!

If you’ve enjoyed shows like My Name is Earl or Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure, then this here’s the script you’ve been a searchin’ for.

Chock full of sharp dialogue, Heritage has super simple locations and would be a pleasure to cast. Trust an old script soldier: this is a skit independent filmmakers will be fighting battles over, even long after the war’s no more than History!

The Script

Heritage

A young man from Alabama who feels his southern heritage is under attack magically speaks with a long dead ancestor and learns that honoring his family name extends beyond flag waving.

About The Writer

Travis Sharp's picture
Real name: 

I am an everyday father, husband, and medical professional who was born to be a writer. I waited for many years to follow that calling and now I am constantly learning, adapting, and networking to pursue the dream. I have a completed feature length, dark comedy that has received quite positive...Read more

Poultice - Life... Has No Price

Poultice
A prairie woman will do anything to keep her unborn child alive.

There is a period of time in American History - at least according to Hollywood - simply known as "The Old West." 

Here you will find stagecoach robberies,  gold in them thar hills,  gunfights at high noon, and lest we forget,  cowboys and Indians.  We all have our favorite Westerns such as "True Grit," "Gunfight at the OK Corral," or more recently, "Unforgiven," and "Pale Rider."  

It's a genre unique to The United States because it's a reflection of our nation's history.

"Poultice,"  written by Anthony Cawood, is that rare quiet Western.   An emotional drama that packs the same punch as a bar room brawl at the local saloon. 

Annie Knox is a prairie woman who desperately wants to have a baby.  She is a woman in her thirties, and after five still-born births, time and odds are running out.  Annie will do anything to keep her unborn child alive.

Annie risks everything for her baby when she ventures into Native American territory in search of a mythical poultice.

Upon arrival to the Indian village,  Annie finds herself face to face with Pauwau, an Indian woman who holds the secret of the poultice. 

But, there is bad blood between them.  Years before, Annie's father killed Pauwau's husband and stole their land.  Annie is eager to trade the land for the poultice, but Pauwau stands firm.  Such an insulting offer will do nothing to return her husband to her and her children.   Or, could it?

"Poultice" is a small drama packed with emotion.   Anthony Cawood's story and dialogue ring true, and feel just as much a part of our American history as Wyatt Earp. 

Directors who are searching for a Western without the big budget should definitely belly up to the bar .

Budget and Requirements:  Small.  Location is key for that "old West" look.   Costumes are equally important. And, of course, two serious dramatic actresses.

The Script

Poultice

A desperate mother to be must trade with the Native American wise woman that her family wronged many years ago.

About The Reviewer

David Troop's picture
Real name: 

Dave Troop began writing as soon as he could hold a No. 2 pencil. In 2012, he discovered the beauty and the challenge of the five page screenplay while writing short scripts for MoviePoet.com and Simplyscripts. Dave continues to write and review short scripts for Script Revolution and Shootin'...Read more

About The Writer

Anthony Cawood's picture
Real name: 

Award-winning screenwriter with one feature produced and a further four features optioned or in pre-production. In addition to features, he has over forty short scripts produced/sold/optioned - including ten filmed. Also occasionally pens screenwriting articles, interviews with writers and...Read more

For the Articles - Just ONE of the Reasons You'll Read This!!

FOR THE ARTICLES
JOHN ROBBINS & TIM WESTLAND

A struggling writer reluctantly accepts a job at a porn magazine.
When people begin reading the magazine “for her articles”,
a rival magazine publisher schemes to expose her and ruin her career.

Aspiring writer, Molly Cadillac, has scored the job interview of her dreams.  Though she’s barely inside the prestigious Lily Park offices before she finds herself on the wrong side of its resident Machiavelli, Victoria Munro.  Finding a window in her schedule, Victoria promptly decides to sabotage Molly’s chances of success.  Because, well, that's what Victoria does best.

A dejected Molly returns to the suburbs, determined to find a way to get her articles published.  It’s a chance encounter with her boyfriend’s porn stash that leads Molly to the offices of Bennet Joy, editor-in-chief of adult magazine Primed.  Bennet takes a shine to Molly and offers her a job filling the white space between centre-folds with low rent erotica.  With bills to pay and a surrogate family to provide for, Molly accepts; quickly learning to navigate the world of Primed and its eccentric assortment of porn industry lifers.

BENNETT 
And here is why the door is red and
we have so many rules. Molly, 
meet Martin, our resident cartoonist 
and human resources nightmare.

When Bennet promotes Molly to Story Editor she sees an opportunity to get her musings into print.  Even if it is under a pseudonym and sandwiched between the coconut-oiled offerings of Mona, Montage and Taffy...

And when Molly’s articles prove an unexpected hit, Primed finds itself thrust into the limelight.  Much to the envy of its high-brow rivals and the ever scheming Victoria who has her own ideas about Molly’s literary future...

Johnny Robbins and Tim Westland’s pilot episode For The Articles finds its fish out of water, Molly Cadillac, caught between the cutthroat ego and insecurity of the literary elite and the colorful characters doomed to anonymity in the basement world of adult glossies.  With its snappy dialogue and offbeat characters For The Articles sets Molly on course for a series of misadventures in life, love and pornography.  A fast moving and memorable 49 pages with the promise of more to come.  Read and enjoy.

The Script

For The Articles

A struggling writer reluctantly accepts a job at a porn magazine. When people begin reading the magazine “for her articles”, a rival magazine publisher schemes to expose her and ruin her career.

About The Reviewer

Steve Miles's picture
Real name: 

Started writing scripts around five years ago after realising his social life was vastly overrated. Enjoys writing in a variety of genres but leans toward raw, grittier characters and the worlds they inhabit - from the deadly serious to the darkly comic. Drinks coffee, owns an unhealthy amount...Read more

About The Writer

Tim Westland's picture
Real name: 

I'm an award winning writer, with multiple feature and short scripts placing highly in Page, Screencraft, BlueCat and other well respected competitions. I'm an avid collaborator and play well with other writers. Below is a small sample of my work.

Saluda        
...Read more

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